Still building the ONLY free floating drums

ARGuy

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I watched all of your youtube videos and still don't have any idea how your drums sound.
 

REF

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Well, Mr. Downing, I certainly appreciate your devotion to your concept. I agree with some of your premises and disagree with others. Ultimately, for each player, sound is the final judge and for me, I did not hear anything substantially different about your drums than others out there, free floating or otherwise. If anything was to be heard that was substantially different; full set play, with cymbals, and the varying touch of each individual player, sticks chosen, heads and tension would largely mask any differences, especially in the context of a band. Place your drums next to a few other manufactured drums of what you consider equal quality and let us hear substantial differences. That is the one thing I have yet to see drum companies do, most of them even within their own lines, let alone next to other manufacturers.

Claims are so easy to make, and as you say, and I agree, hype in the drum industry is out of control.

Comments from users are anecdotal, of course. I'm also curious why you chose to audition all very deep toms. In the one kit shown they seemed the antithesis of drums a Jazz player would use but, that's subjective. Sound is subjective. If you want to make claims, fine. You need to back up those claims by comparison, not in isolated circumstances. That is the only practical way any difference between your instruments and others can be detected. Nobody does that, hence, everybody can make big claims then line up endorsers to "prove" their claims. Indeed, marketing is the thing today.

I wish you well. I wish all makers well. I just wish makers would contend with the field in practical ways consumers can fairly and easily hear.
 

Jordan Blue

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The last I heard - Pearl was still making free floating snares.
 

Fat Drummer

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I have research material somewhere here which suggest that the traditional sizes of American toms were based on wooden lamp shades! I remember that is states early in the 20th century, drum manufactures often made wooden lamp shades as a part of their overall wood molding business and those were standard sizes for lamp shades in the day.

I really will look for the documentation though it's still just going to be another opinion in a sea of them, but that odd fact always stuck with me. Just another abstract idea to chew on, and more likely accurate than the maximization of a sheet of plywood as drum manufactures have never started with a traditional sizes of plywood. They lay up in sheets and cut down to size as needed but I have never known of a drum manufacture actually starting by laying up 4X8 sheets of veneer.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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Well, Mr. Downing, I certainly appreciate your devotion to your concept. I agree with some of your premises and disagree with others. Ultimately, for each player, sound is the final judge and for me, I did not hear anything substantially different about your drums than others out there, free floating or otherwise. If anything was to be heard that was substantially different; full set play, with cymbals, and the varying touch of each individual player, sticks chosen, heads and tension would largely mask any differences, especially in the context of a band. Place your drums next to a few other manufactured drums of what you consider equal quality and let us hear substantial differences. That is the one thing I have yet to see drum companies do, most of them even within their own lines, let alone next to other manufacturers.

Claims are so easy to make, and as you say, and I agree, hype in the drum industry is out of control.

Comments from users are anecdotal, of course. I'm also curious why you chose to audition all very deep toms. In the one kit shown they seemed the antithesis of drums a Jazz player would use but, that's subjective. Sound is subjective. If you want to make claims, fine. You need to back up those claims by comparison, not in isolated circumstances. That is the only practical way any difference between your instruments and others can be detected. Nobody does that, hence, everybody can make big claims then line up endorsers to "prove" their claims. Indeed, marketing is the thing today.

I wish you well. I wish all makers well. I just wish makers would contend with the field in practical ways consumers can fairly and easily hear.
I couldn't express my feelings about what I heard in the videos any better than what REF said.

In short, I listened to the "lectures" and the videos, and I hear absolutely no difference of any importance that makes these drums sound any better than any other quality drum. Sorry. But that's my opinion. They do sound great, but so do dozens of other brands that are not free-floating.

GeeDeeEmm
 

JazzDrumGuy

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I have a set of lugs that are single point with tension rod threads that go up and down. On many occasions, I have tested shells by simply using the lugs, unattached to the shell, and threading rods into the hoops and the lugs. So the shell is not connected to anything and is only touching the heads at the bearing edges. The lugs are "free floating" and the only thing touching the shell are the throw/butt (mounted to the shell).......I don't get it.

Pearl has been doing this for years with a fully free floating shell (all lugs and even the throw/butt don't touch the shell.

I'm no drum maker/sound engineer/artist - I just happen to have a lot of drum parts laying around and crazy ideas!

But I'd like to learn more about the OP's design and hear some of his drums.
 

space jeff

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the whole debate about "free floating" is really a moot point when it comes down to what sounds best. Some of the best sounding drums ever had lots of hardware and heavy lugs all over them. What makes the most difference in my experience is great bearing edges, great tuning and great playing. Everything else is nonsense.
 

Ludwig26

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I've owned 2x sets of Sleishman free-floating drums&IMHO &HO (honest&humble opinions),
Acoustically with NO microphones, NO compression, EQ, gates,
There IS a difference between " normal " drums & "free-floating" type.Once a kit doesn't matter how little, much plies, type of heads, tensioning, shell type,once a kit is EQ'D, compressed, gated,
You're never ever going to hear the pure tonal " notes"/sound once it goes through ex amount of thousands of watts of sound system, evening listening at home or in the car , WHOSE ears are THAT good they can diferentiate between free-floating, "normal" drums listening to a cd, vinyl record or at a concert?.Also the acoustics of the room also affect the sound of the drums!.
 

Ludwig26

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Also Don Sleishman invented the concept over 40yrs ago!,
SO "MR" Downing you're NOT the 1st!,
&I'm certain&sure even some or one of the great American vintage drum companies either started or patented a "free-floating" design?.
 

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