Still building the ONLY free floating drums

REF

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Well, Mr. Downing, I certainly appreciate your devotion to your concept. I agree with some of your premises and disagree with others. Ultimately, for each player, sound is the final judge and for me, I did not hear anything substantially different about your drums than others out there, free floating or otherwise. If anything was to be heard that was substantially different; full set play, with cymbals, and the varying touch of each individual player, sticks chosen, heads and tension would largely mask any differences, especially in the context of a band. Place your drums next to a few other manufactured drums of what you consider equal quality and let us hear substantial differences. That is the one thing I have yet to see drum companies do, most of them even within their own lines, let alone next to other manufacturers.

Claims are so easy to make, and as you say, and I agree, hype in the drum industry is out of control.

Comments from users are anecdotal, of course. I'm also curious why you chose to audition all very deep toms. In the one kit shown they seemed the antithesis of drums a Jazz player would use but, that's subjective. Sound is subjective. If you want to make claims, fine. You need to back up those claims by comparison, not in isolated circumstances. That is the only practical way any difference between your instruments and others can be detected. Nobody does that, hence, everybody can make big claims then line up endorsers to "prove" their claims. Indeed, marketing is the thing today.

I wish you well. I wish all makers well. I just wish makers would contend with the field in practical ways consumers can fairly and easily hear.
 

Jordan Blue

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The last I heard - Pearl was still making free floating snares.
 

Fat Drummer

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I have research material somewhere here which suggest that the traditional sizes of American toms were based on wooden lamp shades! I remember that is states early in the 20th century, drum manufactures often made wooden lamp shades as a part of their overall wood molding business and those were standard sizes for lamp shades in the day.

I really will look for the documentation though it's still just going to be another opinion in a sea of them, but that odd fact always stuck with me. Just another abstract idea to chew on, and more likely accurate than the maximization of a sheet of plywood as drum manufactures have never started with a traditional sizes of plywood. They lay up in sheets and cut down to size as needed but I have never known of a drum manufacture actually starting by laying up 4X8 sheets of veneer.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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Well, Mr. Downing, I certainly appreciate your devotion to your concept. I agree with some of your premises and disagree with others. Ultimately, for each player, sound is the final judge and for me, I did not hear anything substantially different about your drums than others out there, free floating or otherwise. If anything was to be heard that was substantially different; full set play, with cymbals, and the varying touch of each individual player, sticks chosen, heads and tension would largely mask any differences, especially in the context of a band. Place your drums next to a few other manufactured drums of what you consider equal quality and let us hear substantial differences. That is the one thing I have yet to see drum companies do, most of them even within their own lines, let alone next to other manufacturers.

Claims are so easy to make, and as you say, and I agree, hype in the drum industry is out of control.

Comments from users are anecdotal, of course. I'm also curious why you chose to audition all very deep toms. In the one kit shown they seemed the antithesis of drums a Jazz player would use but, that's subjective. Sound is subjective. If you want to make claims, fine. You need to back up those claims by comparison, not in isolated circumstances. That is the only practical way any difference between your instruments and others can be detected. Nobody does that, hence, everybody can make big claims then line up endorsers to "prove" their claims. Indeed, marketing is the thing today.

I wish you well. I wish all makers well. I just wish makers would contend with the field in practical ways consumers can fairly and easily hear.
I couldn't express my feelings about what I heard in the videos any better than what REF said.

In short, I listened to the "lectures" and the videos, and I hear absolutely no difference of any importance that makes these drums sound any better than any other quality drum. Sorry. But that's my opinion. They do sound great, but so do dozens of other brands that are not free-floating.

GeeDeeEmm
 

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