Stop a Wrap Tear

flavorizer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
166
Reaction score
10
Location
Oakland, CA
Hi folks,
Any ideas on how to stop a tear that's beginning in an old 60s slingerland wrap? I'd like to arrest it where it is. A dab of glue? A staple (yikes)? Any ideas would be appreciated.
 

lossforgain

Team DFO
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 22, 2007
Messages
13,309
Reaction score
357
Location
Lancaster, PA
Great question. I don’t have the answer but would be curious if anyone has had success with this.
 

JazzDrumGuy

DFO Master
Joined
Feb 16, 2016
Messages
7,259
Reaction score
745
Location
Pebble Beach, CA
I could never figure out how a tear like that starts. I would take off the mount, and apply glue under the wrap to keep it at bay. I'd use wood glue and a toothpick or small knife blade to go as deep as possible, then leave a clear coat in the gap, too.

I'm interested in others' remedies, too.
 

trixonian

DFO Master
Joined
Feb 1, 2006
Messages
3,550
Reaction score
43
Location
Indiana
I believe the wrap shrinks, and where it pulls against the the part of the lug that fits into the hole in the shell, it causes a split. I have used a dremel to clear remove any wrap that has migrated over the hole in the shell or that has buckled where it has pushed against the lug/screws.

To be clear I’m talking about removing a very small amount under the lug. I believe removing the cause of the cracking, should arrest the issue.
 

flavorizer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
166
Reaction score
10
Location
Oakland, CA
Thanks - I love this kit - it's the one in my profile pic,
Interesting way to think about it. So the spur mount being clamped down and not allowing the wrap to adjust over time could be aggravating or instigating this issue. Maybe I will remove the spur mount for a period of time to free any tension, plus remove any migrated wrap near the hole? That combined with a careful drop of crazy glue in the split. It may end up being a combination of these that stabilizes things. thanks folks!
 

DanC

"Get in, sit down, shut up, hold on"
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
13,584
Reaction score
448
Location
Somewhere in Florida, behind a Rogers kit
The wraps from back then tend to shrink over time as the plastic hardens. The stresses from shrinking can show up at the edge of the wrap, or anywhere there's an opening cut thru the wrap. The tension looks for a weak spot and a crack appears. The wrap is usually pretty stable by now, unless exposed to extreme temps - and vintage drums are usually kept inside, so further cracking should not be an issue.
Using glue at the end of the crack probably won't stop whatever movement that might occur in the future, best to leave it alone imho...
 

rock roll

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
254
Reaction score
89
Location
Northern VA
The wraps from back then tend to shrink over time as the plastic hardens. The stresses from shrinking can show up at the edge of the wrap, or anywhere there's an opening cut thru the wrap. The tension looks for a weak spot and a crack appears. The wrap is usually pretty stable by now, unless exposed to extreme temps - and vintage drums are usually kept inside, so further cracking should not be an issue.
Using glue at the end of the crack probably won't stop whatever movement that might occur in the future, best to leave it alone imho...
I think you'd be surprised at how many drums are in the garage / practice place , with a window unit for a/c in the summer and an oil filled radiator for heat in the winter.
.... Good topic about the wraps.
 

Rik_Everglade

Very well Known Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2012
Messages
1,086
Reaction score
69
Location
Silver Creek, NY
Hard to find Slinger/Leedy ripples that don't have a crack. Good drop of Superglue will help stop it. Worked for me. Just keep it in the crack, and not on top.
 

GeeDeeEmm

Very well Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2018
Messages
626
Reaction score
404
Location
Arkansas
You can arrest the split, but not repair it. Here's how I would do it:

1. Remove the spur and spur receiver.
2. Use a blade to work up under the surrounding wrap an inch or so to make space for some cement. Use some toothpicks to hold the wrap away from the shell.
3. Use a blade to work some contact cement under the wrap (I like Weldwood Original Contact Cement) so that the wrap and the wood are coated.
4. Allow the contact cement to dry for an hour until it feels dry to the touch.
5. Use a veneer roller to roll the wrap back down onto the shell. Use a lot of force.
6. Use a heat gun to warm the wrap as you continue to roll the surface with the veneer roller. BE CAREFUL! The wrap can be destroyed if you overheat it. It will expand and develop permanent wrinkles. So, heat it just so it feels very warm and no more. The heat will cause it to permanently lie down against the shell as the wrap adapts to the slight curvature of the shell below.

If you are squeamish about the heat gun, just use a hair drier - but still be careful.
 

Rik_Everglade

Very well Known Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2012
Messages
1,086
Reaction score
69
Location
Silver Creek, NY
I do not agree with the method described in the above post. I think it would extend the crack even further...Do not do! Accept the crack as it is, just stop it with crazy glue. You won't even see the crack at four feet away. That's a great rule when looking at drums.
 

Swamptrashstompboxes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
78
Reaction score
10
Location
Florida
Thin out some super glue and shoot it in with a small syringe. Stew mac has some stuff that would work nice, but really any superglue thinned in there would be good. After you put it in, put a few rows of painters tape over it tightly and done.
 

69OysterBlue

DFO Master
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
3,540
Reaction score
135
Location
Northeast OH
I use clear Gorilla glue.

Remove the hardware, sponge some water into the crack (to activate the glue), work glue into the opening without stressing the wrap too much, followed by tightly clamping from inside and outside the shell.

The nice thing about Gorilla glue is that any excess glue can be scraped away fairly easily without damage to the wrap.

Good luck!
 

Latest posts



Top