Talk me down from a new Dynasonic

tommykat1

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Coaxing different sounds out of the same drum is a function of how you play it. I can get a dozen different sounds out of my Black Beauty just by how I play it. And after how you play it, the head's always more important than the drum when it comes to what the thing sounds like.

However, the way a drum feels; the way it reacts to your sticks (assuming identical heads) is a function of the drum's design and construction, and this is where I think the Dyna-Sonic excels. It's just plain easier to play and it responds more quickly to small and large changes in sticking than any other drum I've ever played.

I can get my Dyna-Sonic to sound identical to my Black Beauty, and vise-versa (although the BB has one distinct overtone that the Dyna lacks). And if I fiddle with the adjustments (read: muck them up a bit) I can even get my Dyna to feel and play like my Black Beauty. But I can NOT get my Black Beauty to feel and play like my (properly-adjusted) Dyna-Sonic no matter what I do to the BB.

This means all the difference in my playing, but it may not make a bit of difference in yours. The only way to tell is to play one. The experience is not transferable.
I disagree, but you know that. I feel the way you do about my Powertones. Have you tried one? the 3 ply Clevelands from 1964ish - 66 are the ones to go for.

I played a COB Dyna from 1967 - 1981 because I couldn't afford to buy a second snare, and I never really cared for it. I lump my 2 1980s XP10 Supertens, 1981 5" XP10 Dyna and 1964 5" fruitwood stain blue sparkle Dyna in the same boat: 10 lug snares that don't play any differently from the 6 and 8 lug snares, but sound choked and need too much attention to getting them to sound decent.
 

hsosdrum

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I played a COB Dyna from 1967 - 1981 because I couldn't afford to buy a second snare, and I never really cared for it. I lump my 2 1980s XP10 Supertens, 1981 5" XP10 Dyna and 1964 5" fruitwood stain blue sparkle Dyna in the same boat: 10 lug snares that don't play any differently from the 6 and 8 lug snares, but sound choked and need too much attention to getting them to sound decent.
I totally understand. 8-Lug snares definitely do have more of a chance for the shell to "breathe". However, my preference has always been for 10-lug snares. Since 1970 I've owned (and extensively played) a 5x14 Ludwig Super-Sensitive, a Fibes SFT690, a Gretsch 4158, a Valley Drum Shop custom-made 7x14, my LB416BT and now my Dyna-Sonic — every one a 10-lug drum. I never found any of them to sound choked (in fact, my new Dyna-Sonic is the least-choked sounding snare I've ever played). And I've always found it much easier to get a good sound out of a 10-lug snare than an 8- or 6-lug model. But to each his own, and I know that you're not the only drummer in the 8-lug camp. (So does Ludwig: they now offer the Black Beauty in an 8-lug version.)
 

bongomania

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I generally prefer fewer lugs too, like my precious Luxor, but my most-used snare is a 10-lug, and the new Dyna sure didn't sound choked in that demo video.

That said, I talked myself down. Sure don't need to spend that kind of money on a snare in our current situation, especially when I can't try one locally, and especially since the $900 sparkle lacquer ones really do look better to me than the wraps. I can wait.
 

tommykat1

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Choked is probably the wrong word. Monosyllabic is maybe more apropos. I find I can't coax the different sounds I want out of 10 lug (or 20 lug) snares. Multi-lugged Snares just seem to be less articulate. I love the wide open sound that minimal hardware produces.

My 2014 Gretsch Renown 6.5" with 20 lugs has let me down at a number of gigs. I dumped the die cast rims in favor of triple flange (from one of my Rogers snares) hoping it would help. They made a small difference, but, still, I'd get weird results in some rooms. The killer for me was an outdoor concert where the sound man couldn't dial the sucker in. It sounded just.flat.horrible. Same with my 5" XP10 Rogers Superten, one of the rarest production drums ever--only 20 or so made. Sounded great in my home drum space, but I took it to a jam wanting to impress the other drummers, and it absolutely sucked.

Not so the Powertone in wood, COB, 6.5 or 5. These drums just don't disappoint in any environment. I've taken several to jams and the house drummers have been really happy to hear and play them. (BTW, same with Rogers 8 lug Holiday, Spotlight and the 6 lug Luxors.)

I don't want to have to worry about what my snare will sound like in any room of any size or outdoors, and the Rogers 6 and 8 luggers have NEVER let me down. I don't even have to think about them. And I certainly don't want to have to try to tune a snare drum in the middle of a show!

My Dynas, Supertens and Gretsch? I always worry about what they will sound like. And they have let me down on numerous occasions, so they stay in the display case at home now.
 

tommykat1

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One last thought. Every Powertone I've bought has sounded good right out of the box. Not so the ten luggers, which always need fiddling.

My favorite of all--the 5" blue sparkle 3 ply 1964 Cleveland with extra holes--came from Jollity Drum Farm with old worn out heads, and Bobby Chiasson said he hadn't tuned it in years. I grinned ear-to-ear when I started playing 'er, even before getting 'er on a stand.
 

hsosdrum

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... I certainly don't want to have to try to tune a snare drum in the middle of a show...
Really? Over the past few decades I've found that after playing a few songs with heavy rimshot backbeats I always have to bring up the lug that's closest to where my left stick consistently lands. Doesn't matter what snare, they all need a bit of re-tuning during an hour-long set. It only takes a few seconds...

OT: Back when I was on the road for 6 years in the 70s (playing 4 sets a night) I would consistently break ordinary 3-flange steel hoops on my SFT690 along the vertical bend right at that rimshot location. I finally wised-up and installed a Slingerland cast brass hoop and that stopped that!
 

jaymandude

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Choked is probably the wrong word. Monosyllabic is maybe more apropos. I find I can't coax the different sounds I want out of 10 lug (or 20 lug) snares. Multi-lugged Snares just seem to be less articulate. I love the wide open sound that minimal hardware produces.

My 2014 Gretsch Renown 6.5" with 20 lugs has let me down at a number of gigs. I dumped the die cast rims in favor of triple flange (from one of my Rogers snares) hoping it would help. They made a small difference, but, still, I'd get weird results in some rooms. The killer for me was an outdoor concert where the sound man couldn't dial the sucker in. It sounded just.flat.horrible. Same with my 5" XP10 Rogers Superten, one of the rarest production drums ever--only 20 or so made. Sounded great in my home drum space, but I took it to a jam wanting to impress the other drummers, and it absolutely sucked.

Not so the Powertone in wood, COB, 6.5 or 5. These drums just don't disappoint in any environment. I've taken several to jams and the house drummers have been really happy to hear and play them. (BTW, same with Rogers 8 lug Holiday, Spotlight and the 6 lug Luxors.)

I don't want to have to worry about what my snare will sound like in any room of any size or outdoors, and the Rogers 6 and 8 luggers have NEVER let me down. I don't even have to think about them. And I certainly don't want to have to try to tune a snare drum in the middle of a show!

My Dynas, Supertens and Gretsch? I always worry about what they will sound like. And they have let me down on numerous occasions, so they stay in the display case at home now.
it's interesting ( strange ?) that you would attribute that to the number of lugs, but of course given your predisposition to 8 lug drums I can understand that. But it would be interesting for you to take out a few of my 10 lugs drums to see if you got the same inpression A walnut Craviotto for example, or a 80's bronze Supraphonic. Or someone else;'s Noble and Cooley.
 

tommykat1

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it's interesting ( strange ?) that you would attribute that to the number of lugs, but of course given your predisposition to 8 lug drums I can understand that. But it would be interesting for you to take out a few of my 10 lugs drums to see if you got the same inpression A walnut Craviotto for example, or a 80's bronze Supraphonic. Or someone else;'s Noble and Cooley.
I'd love to do that at some point in time! I have played some Ludwigs, including my Dad's wood one from the '50s (long gone) and thought they sounded very decent. In fact, my 1967 COB Dyna was to replace that old Ludwig, but I liked it better than the Dyna, so I held onto it for awhile. I let it go in the late 80s. Long story.

At present, my comparisons are all Rogers to Rogers, so, yes, the data is incomplete.
 


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