Tape vs Glue wrap installation

Ron_M

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This makes intuitive sense, but I would not recommend it. The reason is that, over time, the pressure of the lug "digging in" can cause the overlap to bubble up right above it. This may be less of an issue with a throwoff, but my advice is to let the glue do its job. If the overlap lifts a bit without hardware holding it down (which it shouldn't*), it's pretty easy to fix. If the pressure of the hardware is causing the lift, the fix is going to be more challenging.

*one thing to keep in mind is to be sure you area scuffing up the overlapped area with sandpaper prior to gluing. This really helps with adhesion. Our approach to this was to dry fit the wrap with clamps. While clamped, we'd cut the notches and tape off the overlap area. Then you can safely sand the overlap area.
Good points. Now that I think about it, it's probably done more often to hide the seam, rather than hold it down. At least after the dark days of shrinking wraps. Those Ludwig rivets....
 

SwivoNut

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I used Jammin' Sam's tape method and it failed big time. I followed the directions to the letter but it didn't hold. I had to remove the tape residue, then glue the ends with contact cement. The wrap was Sam's True Black Glass Glitter. The glass glitter wraps are quite a bit thicker than the sparkle and pearl wraps. Maybe the tape works OK on the thinner wraps.
 

sksmith-1

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I don't see any pro level, commercial or boutique manufactures using tape. Rest my case.
I thought DW did on the original and Collector's Series drums. Also thought Pearl did on their wrapped pro level drums. Tama probably did as well.
I don't if any of them do any longer, but pretty sure it was standard for a while (80's / 90's?).
Steve
 

jptrickster

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Dw did it for a hot minute it was a mess. Pearl and Tama and a few other Imports did it as well, same results bubbling warping and coming apart at the seams . I was referring to pro level drums of today not back in the experimental stage. We all know what happens to the taped on wraps, leave it in the hot sun for 10 minutes, you’ll see the train wreck
 

Rik_Everglade

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Pearl used to just tape the overlap, at least on the 1970's fiberglass drums. That worked perfectly for them. I'm debating this myself as I'm about to wrap a tom myself, Pearl fiberglass shell.
 

DanRH

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I’ve tried the tape method on several projects, just because Sam insisted it’s so much better.

For me, a BIG FAIL, every time! The seams lift. And I followed his procedure to the letter. I always have to reglue.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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my method - glue it, using 3M 30nf only. . . .
Good post, RP.

I like to use petroleum-based contact cement, especially considering how many wood-working sources cite long-term failure to bond with water-based cement. These bonding problems may not be the case with modern water-based cements, but there were certainly problems in the past. Regardless . . .

For many years, my go-to contact cement has been WeldWood "Original" cement, which has yet to yield any bonding failures. So, I called Precision Drum Company and inquired about using Weldwood petroleum-based contact cement on my current recovering project. I was told that the use of petro-based cements is "no problem with pearl wraps," and that Delmar's recommendation of 3M-30NF is based upon state and federal air quality standards laws concerning non- or minimally-vented workplaces.


I just completed rewrapping the first drum using the WeldWood "Original" contact cement, and it worked perfectly.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Salem street drums

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Good post, RP.

I like to use petroleum-based contact cement, especially considering how many wood-working sources cite long-term failure to bond with water-based cement. These bonding problems may not be the case with modern water-based cements, but there were certainly problems in the past. Regardless . . .

For many years, my go-to contact cement has been WeldWood "Original" cement, which has yet to yield any bonding failures. So, I called Precision Drum Company and inquired about using Weldwood petroleum-based contact cement on my current recovering project. I was told that the use of petro-based cements is "no problem with pearl wraps," and that Delmar's recommendation of 3M-30NF is based upon state and federal air quality standards laws concerning non- or minimally-vented workplaces.


I just completed rewrapping the first drum using the WeldWood "Original" contact cement, and it worked perfectly.

GeeDeeEmm
They told me the same. I ordered wrap for two snares and she advised me to buy the DAP product locally.....rather than buying the 3M from them. That way I could avoid having to buy an entire can of 3M for two drums.
 

K.O.

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View attachment 387176 And when those taped seams fail lol
The saddest thing about that is that wrap is actual chrome plated steel, pretty unlikely that it was going to shrink and pull apart at the seam the way the plastic wraps were so those rivets were pointless on that drum (pretty sure Ludwig was still gluing the wrap on the shells at that point not just taping the seams...but the plastic wraps they were using weren't dimensionally stable).
 

bellbrass

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Sam bought a ton of that tape, and he trapped me on the phone once and practically refused to sell me wrap unless I bought his tape. He's great to deal with, until you get into the "tape vs. glue" conversation.
Glue all the way; it's the only way.
 

REF

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I've used both glue - Contact cement and heavy duty spray adhesives - and tape - FastCap Speedtape, and it's a monster. I used the tape on the entire piece of veneer, not just edges and seam. Not sure how others have used or recommend but, that Speedtape is quite permanent.
 

GeeDeeEmm

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. . . FastCap Speedtape, and it's a monster. I used the tape on the entire piece of veneer, not just edges and seam. . . . .
Hmm. I guess I've been out of the loop when it comes to modern two-sided tapes. I wasn't aware of the SpeedTape at all, but it looks very interesting:

https://www.fastcap.com/product/speedtape

I'm thinking, based on the company videos, that using it the way you did - 100% coverage - should yield great results - and especially if used over a factory "lacquer" finish. I'll have to check into the SpeedTape.

I'm wondering if the problems experienced with tape has been the result of (a) using it on bare, untreated wood, and (b) using the tape only at the seams. Using tape on bare wood seems like a formula for failure because the pressure-sensitive tape makes contact only with the "raised" grains and not with the entire surface. I'm curious if heating the tape/wrap would give the tape a deeper grip on the wood's surface. I'd also think that if the bare wood was treated with a grain sealer before wrapping, it would be more likely to offer closer to 100% adherence.

I'll still use contact cement for wrapping, but I'm inclined now to at least buy some SpeedTape and do some experimentation on some leftover wrap and bare wood. This could be a fun project, and might lead me to finding a tape method that I could trust. We'll see.

Thanks for tolerating my meandering mind and tossing around some thoughts.

GeeDeeEmm
 

REF

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I redid a set of inexpensive drums for a friend. The original wrap just had tape at the seam. I used the Speed Tape on bare wood. I wasn't sure how it would work. I first tried some tape on bare wood to see how it would hold. The tape held so well I just threw out the block of wood. I couldn't yank it off and wasn't going to use solvents. I was impressed. The tape has a very sound glue on it that really molded to every aspect of the bare wood.

I redid the set in a very thin mahogany veneer I got off ebay. It has a glossy paper-type backing of some kind. I've not seen it before. Six years later the set looks good, though. It's just a house set. It doesn't get exposed to straight sun but, I wouldn't see a problem for an outside gig.
 


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