Technique limits and the impact on style

Pat A Flafla

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Style and chops are two separate attributes. My chops are pretty good, and I love playing greasy-ass shuffles as authentically as possible while putting maybe 1% of a personal stamp on it. The hands don't control the brain.
 
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toddbishop

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The biggest impact on "style" is just having ideas of what to play, or not having ideas. Technique is overrated as a contributing factor to that-- maybe your chops need to catch up with your ideas, but they don't create ideas. The idea that a playing personality comes from technical limitations is thinking backwards-- playing is built out of nothing, and people develop the technique to do what they need and want to do. It's not just a lot of people settling with wherever they got stuck.

A Ferrari-like Weckl/Vinnie type of drummer is just one type of musician like any other, and they're just as defined by their particular abilities as anyone else. Nobody calls them when they want Jim Keltner, they cannot duplicate Jim Keltner's contribution. Calling Weckl when you wanted Billy Higgins is another thing that never happened. The idea that when you achieve Ferrari chops you then just have the choice to do whatever you want isn't really true.
 

Toast Tee

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I've thought a LOT about my limitations, especially the past few years. Atl is right. I could practice 15 hours a day, and never play like some of the drummers I've known, let alone Vinnie.

On the other hand Vinnie could have practice pitching 15 hours a day, and never could have thrown like a pro pitcher, even if he played his entire life
Imo a person can only go as far as their natural talent will take them.
 

hsosdrum

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The biggest impact on "style" is just having ideas of what to play, or not having ideas. Technique is overrated as a contributing factor to that-- maybe your chops need to catch up with your ideas, but they don't create ideas. The idea that a playing personality comes from technical limitations is thinking backwards-- playing is built out of nothing, and people develop the technique to do what they need and want to do. It's not just a lot of people settling with wherever they got stuck...
Just thinking of a musical idea doesn't make it part of your style, you must also be able to play it. The limits of your technique form the limits of your style because they form the limits of what you can play. And if you can't play it, it ain't part of your style.
 

toddbishop

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Just thinking of a musical idea doesn't make it part of your style, you must also be able to play it. The limits of your technique form the limits of your style because they form the limits of what you can play. And if you can't play it, it ain't part of your style.
Like I said, people develop the technique to do what they need to do. Good musicians.

I'm not really concerned about cultivating a style, I don't think in those terms.
 

Seb77

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The idea that when you achieve Ferrari chops you then just have the choice to do whatever you want isn't really true.
Agreed. That kind of "ferrari chops" does not include everything you could ever play on a set of drums.
In more general terms: you can't expect to be able to play one thing when you have practised another; you need to practise the things you want to be able to play. Maybe instead of "Practsising" a better, wider term might be "practitioning"; it could be just be lots of gigs where you develop your playing.
 


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