Ten Reasons to Buy an Electronic Drum Kit

Hypercaffium

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I don't need 10 reasons, just one: volume. I live in an apartment building and I can't play an acoustic kit. I mean... literaly.
 

ocgvictoria

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Different prospective - was a classically trained drummer and played in several bands in my youth then went off to college and was completely out of drumming for more than 20 years. Decided to get back into it and thought Vdrums would be a great first step for all the reasons posted above by pro Vdrummers. Now that I have a year of vdrums behind me, I am currently restoring a Premier XPK acoustic kit from the late 80s early 90s. Soon I will have the advantages of both Vdrums and an acoustic kit.
 

achin225

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The one and only reason I have a e-set is if I didn't have one I wouldn't be playing at all. My living situation wouldn't allow an accoustic set.
 

Quai34

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  • I was closed to buy the TD17, KVN??, In fact, the high end plus extra pas and I was around 2200 Can$ plus taxes... My idea was than I was going to record it super easy and to be able to have, for one, a drummer that was not going to blow us our ears (I run the PA, héhé....). But finally found a vintage kit, with the craftmanship of wood, real cymbals, I found in love with the instrument, bought more real cymbals with the difference and that's it. I had room ok, in a house ok....But to record now, I have to set up mic, treatment on walls, cables, computer etc....Minded on an e.kit (ok, not every e-kit have the memory card!).
  • So, well, the feel of own something that has an history and the look, plus the fact that it was cheaper for me for a nice kit, pushed the balance towards the electronic kit.
 

JohnnyVibesAZ

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And here is 1 reason not to:
I have NEVER heard one electronic kit sound identical to an acoustic kit. Not ONE. "Hit this button and it has maple shells. Hit this button and it has birch shells and hit this one at it has rare bubinga shells. Hit this button and it sounds like baloney shells!"
 

Anthony84

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Practice is my number one reason! And the module sounds have come a long way, as has the playability. Idk, I own an atv adrums set and I love it! Along with a pearl mimic module. It’s definitely helped me become a better drummer. Driving to the lockout is silly now. The more time you have behind a kit, the better.
 

Kennersk

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Were you playing rubber or mesh electronic drums? I haven't found much difference in muscle memory / feel from an acoustic drum with a low volume head and a mesh-head electronic, and it's (IMO) much more enjoyable to play on the electronic drums.

Totally agreed on cymbals though - electronic cymbals just don't cut it, as far as touch / feel. For me, the ideal combination has been mesh electronic drums with acoustic cymbals. I'll use the low-volume cymbals if I need to really cut down the noise, but for 90% of the time, the high frequencies that cymbals produce don't really travel that far. I play my mesh-head electronic kit with regular cymbals (22" ride, 19" crash, 15" hats) with the door closed, and my wife can sit in the room next door and watch TV at a comfortable volume.



Hello

Have you ever performed with that arrangement (electronic drums & real cymbals)? Did it work out acoustically? If so, how did you mic the kit?

I've just joined a prog rock band. The rehearsals are at the lead guitarist's home, where he has a basement studio with an electronic kit. A DrumIt3 kit with mesh heads. The kit is fine but the cymbals leave much to be desired. I've talked the leader into letting me use my cymbals on gigs.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Regards,

Ken
 

bpaluzzi

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Hello

Have you ever performed with that arrangement (electronic drums & real cymbals)? Did it work out acoustically? If so, how did you mic the kit?

I've just joined a prog rock band. The rehearsals are at the lead guitarist's home, where he has a basement studio with an electronic kit. A DrumIt3 kit with mesh heads. The kit is fine but the cymbals leave much to be desired. I've talked the leader into letting me use my cymbals on gigs.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Regards,

Ken

Yup! I’ve used it several times. I mic the cymbals with a pair of small diaphragm condenser overheads (spaced pair) with the low cut filters engaged. In a lot of modern live settings, overheads are already being used as “cymbal mics” only, so sound engineers are relatively used to doing it. I’ll generally send just a stereo pair from the drums and tell the sound guy to treat it as if it’s a stereo backing track: just amplify this signal, running through whatever house/corrective EQ you have in place for the room. Don’t worry about enhancing EQ / compression, I’ll handle that at my end.
 

ButchA

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The main reason for an electronic kit? Happy Wife = Happy Life! :lol:

For 36 years, I have been begging for an acoustic kit (flipped around Lefty). "NO... NO... NO... NO... You already have a trumpet, cornet, trombone, tenor sax, 5 guitars, a bass, and now a full size Yamaha keyboard. Plus a 100watt Boss Katana amp, a small bass amp, a PA system, etc... you do NOT need drums!!" :angry7: -- quote, un-quote from my lovely wife.

SOOOO... We made a compromise. I showed her the various Alesis and Roland E-drum kits at the local music store. I mainly showed her the console, the settings, and most importantly, THE VOLUME KNOB, AND HEADPHONE JACK!

She agreed... So, when she's not home, I plug into my PA system and rock the hell out! When she's home, I wear my Sennheiser headphones and jam quietly in the house.
 

kingindnorth

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They are easy to set up and adjust levels for recording. one thing i love about them is that they make virtually no noise which allow playing at any hour without disturbing anyone.
 

kingindnorth

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They are easy to set up and adjust levels for recording. one thing i love about them is that they make virtually no noise which allow playing at any hour without disturbing anyone.
 

Hypercaffium

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Recently I've built a low volume acoustic kit with L80s and Remo Silentroke heads. Like I expected, it immediately became my main practice kit, so I didn't play my electronic kit at all for a couple of months.
Last week I goofed around with it for a little bit and fell in love again. Despite the fact that it isn't a "real" acoustic kit, it sounds better, it's extremely practical and comfortable, and I can do literaly anything I want especially with MIDI and mapping.
I will keep both the kits, hands down.
 

Quai34

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The main reason for an electronic kit? Happy Wife = Happy Life! :lol:

For 36 years, I have been begging for an acoustic kit (flipped around Lefty). "NO... NO... NO... NO... You already have a trumpet, cornet, trombone, tenor sax, 5 guitars, a bass, and now a full size Yamaha keyboard. Plus a 100watt Boss Katana amp, a small bass amp, a PA system, etc... you do NOT need drums!!" :angry7: -- quote, un-quote from my lovely wife.

SOOOO... We made a compromise. I showed her the various Alesis and Roland E-drum kits at the local music store. I mainly showed her the console, the settings, and most importantly, THE VOLUME KNOB, AND HEADPHONE JACK!

She agreed... So, when she's not home, I plug into my PA system and rock the hell out! When she's home, I wear my Sennheiser headphones and jam quietly in the house.
Well... I was close to have that too, I don't have any trumpet, corner. Tenor sax or trombone, I have 5 guitars and 3 bass, 2 Guitar Amps, one bass Amp and 2 bass cabs, 3 mixers but JUST a sample PA, like 2 powered speakers 2X10 but yes, the drums was not needed especially that I'm not a drummer per se but a keys player with already 6 keyboards and several modules...
But the look of an acoustic drums kit and the fact that it was still cheaper to buy used than an electronic one, made me choose the acoustic...! I have no room for both, so, it was one and one only. And I was insisting a lot of having my new band practiced at my place otherwise, well, it's your band but you depend on someone else to practice with your instruments at the other guy's place?? I tried, it last 2 months...
But I can surely understand all the benefits, as I said, I was close to buy a Roland TD17 something (the best and more extended version of it, can't remember the name exactly sorry) for my only one drums kit!!!!
I wanted also something that had an history and a craftsman ship in it. And you cannot have that with an electronic kit: it's like computers, when they are obsolete, you dump them, the acoustic kit doesn't become obsolete, it becomes "Vintage"!!!
 

Matched Gripper

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The main reason for an electronic kit? Happy Wife = Happy Life! :lol:

For 36 years, I have been begging for an acoustic kit (flipped around Lefty). "NO... NO... NO... NO... You already have a trumpet, cornet, trombone, tenor sax, 5 guitars, a bass, and now a full size Yamaha keyboard. Plus a 100watt Boss Katana amp, a small bass amp, a PA system, etc... you do NOT need drums!!" :angry7: -- quote, un-quote from my lovely wife.

SOOOO... We made a compromise. I showed her the various Alesis and Roland E-drum kits at the local music store. I mainly showed her the console, the settings, and most importantly, THE VOLUME KNOB, AND HEADPHONE JACK!

She agreed... So, when she's not home, I plug into my PA system and rock the hell out! When she's home, I wear my Sennheiser headphones and jam quietly in the house.
I got my wife her very own pair of GK Ultraphones to plug into her iPhone (with an adapter).
 

Tymp2002

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How is an electronic drum set like a fat girlfriend? It's fun, but you're not sure you want your friends to see you with it.

Humor aside, the folks at MusicRadar.com -- who recently crowned Tool's Danny Carey as the King of Noodly Doodly Drummers -- just published the definitive list of the Top 10 Reasons to Buy an Electronic Drum Kit.

Sadly, they didn't touch on the fact that a clear majority of today's professional drummers play a hybrid set -- with some electronic component augmenting their acoustic sets.

With all of that said, here's a tight synopsis of MusicRadar's over-long list:

1. Volume ... Never more than now has there been a greater need for hearing yourself mainly through headphones (paired with as much or as little backing track as you care to hear).

2. Variety ... Change from "vintage jazz to stadium rock to an 808-style electronic kit at the touch of a button."

3. Playability ... Apparently, rubber pads are not as bad as they used to be.

4. Practice ... Built-in practice tools like a metronome and, as previously mentioned, tracks via your headphones.

5. Portability and space ... I guess.

6. You can expand the sounds ... A repeat of No. 2?

7. You can expand the pads ... A la Terry Bozzio?

8. Price ... Actual cymbals that are hand-hammered -- a term that makes non-drummers giggle -- can be crazy expensive.

9. Recording ... Puh-leeze.

10. You'll become a more versatile musician... Like No. 9, utter balderdash!


Wow, this post along with many of the others seemed like something one would read 10 years ago. The technology has come a long way on e-drums.

I still prefer acoustic cymbals, but Roland is tackling the cymbals and will soon have it solved. They already have a ride cymbal and a HH cymbal that is rocking the space - check their digital offerings.

I have converted one of my 3 acoustic kits using a TD-30 module, mesh heads and internal triggers. They "feel" like acoustic drums, sound great, record great, are FUN to play. These are in my drum studio. (I also have a second acoustic snare with coated head for brush playing.)

And e-drums record great. I think the person who wrote the music radar article is mis-informed. And most recordings of acoustic drums use so much compression, and reverb, etc. they don't sound anything like they do originally. You can save the time, effort, and expense of all that recording gear and get great sounds from edrums and/or by using VST's.

You can't beat the portability and quiet of edrums - in fact, they are about the only option in a lot of communities like apartment complexes.

And if you aren't using any electronics in your gigging setup, you are missing out.
I use triggers on the bass and snare drums on my gigging acoustic kit - mostly for sound re-inforcement. But with a touch of a button, I get other sounds as I need them. I use condenser mics for my acoustic cymbals. I also use an additional multipad on occassion. Yes, I get compliments about the sound.

They are excellent practice tools! I love the comment that kicked around long ago about a first drum kit; "buy an acoustic kit first, you will never learn the feel on an e-kit." This is the same guy who spent more time on his practice pad than his acoustic kit.

-Tymp
 
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iainmarlow

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First/inaugural post for me!

I spent many sad years without my beautiful Ayottes because I was moving around different small apartments in cities, and living abroad. Had always found the idea of shelling out the cash for a digital kit offensive, given how much you need to spend to find something even remotely good. Finally pulled the trigger on a Roland TD25kv set, and honestly, I have spent three or four years in bliss. Finally able to practice, and hone up my feel for live jams. Obviously not comparable, but for some the choice isn't 'between' acoustic and digital drums (there's really no argument there) -- it's between digital drums or nothing. And these are better than nothing!

Some additional pros:

Wailing along to Spotify is pretty effortless on digital drums.

Recording stuff is a breeze (and it sounds really good without any mics, obviously).

Don't underestimate the fun you can have switching up your kit with a click -- jazz, to stadium rock, to 808s. Can tweak tunings, mufflings, etc, on the nicer digital sets.

That said, I relish any chance I get to play acoustic kits, mostly in rehearsal spots! Cheers
 


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