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Thanks to the Fred Below thread…

Ian S

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Ahe..ahe..ahem Squirrel hey man, I had played some damn good songs for y'all to set down and study, but I'm afeared they were's 'lost in the shuffle'. ;)

(so I delete the post from an hour ago on page 3.. and put it here)





 

Tornado

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Well I’m wrong it seems on this song.

Let’s say it “ barely “ shuffles ….

I mean... Let's not go around calling Peter Criss a master drummer, lol. He did what he needed to do though.
 

Tornado

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Well at least I found a post that had Freddie King, Louis Jordan and Rockpile. That almost redeemed the thread.

I think the point of thread was songs and grooves that stretch the definition of shuffle, but still fit in. But we had Art Blakey playing Moanin' on page 1. :)
 

Ian S

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As much as I had thought someone was gonna put up a scientific diagram of a shuffle. Okay, Tornado reminds Tubwompus' original point was where are the boundaries and what people fit within them, to define a shuffle. What's one's front porch broom shuffle. Is another's skittle skattle. Or worse, hump-ty hump. One arduous pimpstrut shuffle is to others just a gimp gamey leg and doesn't swing?

This evening I spent a good three hours and I enjoyed looking around my various folders of saved youtube videos searching examples of shuffles that don't sound too similar. I'd never guess drummers could argue so vehemently about what a shuffle is, and this has been a lot of fun and very interesting.

Here's some more anyhow..






Prototype shuffle.
 

becken

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See? Right there, perception is everything. Love it.
In my own personal world, La Grange is a Chicago shuffle, I.e., the shuffle rhythm is played on the snare, regardless of what the other hand is playing.

A Texas shuffle in my world, is something such as these…
(That’s Stevie on drums btw)

"Old Brown Shoe", uses something I learned as a "flat tire shuffle", also called a "church shuffle" here in SC. Snare beats not on 2 or 4, but the middle beat of the triplets, of the 6/8 or 12/8 feel. Easy to learn and once learned use it judiciously, depending on the tempo and "feel" that is appropriate."Old Brown Shoe" also goes into sections that are more a regular shuffle or regular 2/4, 4/4 beat.
 

RayB

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But they are both unequivocally shuffles. The particular style of shuffle can get into the realm of opinion. :). I think there's a ton of overlap between Chicago and Texas shuffles, and I think in a lot of cases you can use the term interchangeably. My opinion is that the swing is a little straighter in the Texas shuffle. But clearly artists from both regions have done it different ways.
I'm very impressed how Stevie Ray Vaughn's drummer can whip 2 & 4 in his Texas shuffle beat. He never wavers a bit. So no disrespect intended: I don't care for it. I guess the strong 2 & 4 makes it "rock" more, but it doesn't have the flow of the Fred Below shuffle. "Swing" to me means there's a pendulum swinging between 1 & 2, 3 & 4. The rhythm has weight to it and the drummer swings the weight back and forth. That's the motion that "gets the party started", whether it's straight 8 rock, reggae, classic swing, shuffles, R & B, or any beat that gets the shimmy going in people.

It's not necessary to snap out 2 & 4, it's necessary to get the weight going back and forth. The Texas Shuffle feels too exaggerated to me, like it's relentlessly telling you when to nod and snap your finger, instead of just letting you feel it in your body.
 


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