The 16 Favorite Drummers of the Greatest Prog Musician of All Time

BennyK

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Maybe ask Mike Portnoy, Danny Carey and all the other many pros that looked up to Peart.
Well, I'm asking YOU instead . I'm curious what he originated . It's cool that he used a Slingerland snare with clear batter heads on many of their earlier albums . One of my favourite rides was the Neil Peart Paragon 22" Sabian , I should have kept that one . I never looked up to him or down on him .I'm curious as to what exactly he originated .

That's all . Don't be so touchy .
 
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JimmySticks

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Well, I'm asking YOU instead . I'm curious what he originated . Why so touchy ?
Im not sure if Neil is the originator, but he was one of the pioneers of drumming in a 3 piece power band. There weren’t to many 3 piece bands out there because it takes a lot of talent for all of the musicians involved and it takes a lot of chops and skill to fill in for the lack of instruments and keep the sound full.

Did Palmer and ELP come before Rush?
 

Cauldronics

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I’d actually love to hear Bonham do Rush. I think a little swing (a little!) from John might have sounded pretty good and made Rush music less chop driven, made it groove a bit and made them open up to a wider audience, but we’ll never know...
There’s a question right there. Who had a bigger fan base? Rush or Led Zeppelin? More albums sold? I’d guess Zep.

I think there couldn’t have been a better drummer for either band. Both are two of the top examples of drummers who defined the sound of their band. That said I too would’ve liked to hear Bonham play with Rush for a song or two. Peart with Zep would also be very interesting.
 

Cauldronics

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Neil was also big on Steve Smith, matt Cameron, chad gravy from live and Steve Smith, notice I said his name twice
I wouldn’t have guessed he dug Matt Cameron, one of the most underrated (though highly rated) rock drummers ever, IMHO. I have yet to hear anyone who does what MC did with Soundgarden in the way that he did it. He still sounds fresh to me when I hear him.
 

Prufrock

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ELP came before Rush , The Experience , Cream and likely some others too .
ELP was a supergroup that formed later than The Experience (Hendrix would die a month or so after ELP was formed) and Cream (already split up), and after the first two King Crimson records (which Lake sang on). Emerson's previous group, The Nice, was contemporary with The Experience and Cream.

I was glad to see Michael Giles included on the list. His drumming on In the Court of the Crimson King is unique and highly influential, even if people haven't heard of him. The influence is even greater due to people sampling his break on the song "Tomorrow's People" from the post-Crimson album "McDonald & Giles."
 

Houndog

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Well, I'm asking YOU instead . I'm curious what he originated . It's cool that he used a Slingerland snare with clear batter heads on many of their earlier albums . One of my favourite rides was the Neil Peart Paragon 22" Sabian , I should have kept that one . I never looked up to him or down on him .I'm curious as to what exactly he originated .

That's all . Don't be so touchy .
What have you originated , have you even played in an original band at least ??
 

drummingbulldog

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No matter what you think of Peart, he influenced a ton on young drummers. Too many jazz snobs on this forum. On top of turning millions onto drumming he was a nice, thoughtful human being.
 

Houndog

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I also expect a video of all you naysayers, and you had better be swinging your butt off !!
 

squidart

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Not sure why folks have a problem with him admiring swingers just because he didn't play that way. I respect and admire a lot of "technicians" but I can't even approach what they do in a believable way. I'm wired more like Mitch or Michael Giles or Chris Cutler, but I am gobsmacked at Bruford and Peart.
Dig?
 

bigbonzo

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I like the fact that Neil went out of his comfort zone to do Cottontail and go traditional grip in his later years. True, it wasn’t great, but the fact that he did it at all speaks highly of the man.

I’d actually love to hear Bonham do Rush. I think a little swing (a little!) from John might have sounded pretty good and made Rush music less chop driven, made it groove a bit and made them open up to a wider audience, but we’ll never know...
Neil didn't play traditional grip during his later years. He learned traditional grip from Freddie Gruber, then played that grip for one album and the subsequent tour. Then used that grip, when on tour, only when he played songs from that album.
 

Houndog

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Not sure why folks have a problem with him admiring swingers just because he didn't play that way. I respect and admire a lot of "technicians" but I can't even approach what they do in a believable way. I'm wired more like Mitch or Michael Giles or Chris Cutler, but I am gobsmacked at Bruford and Peart.
Dig?
I don’t understand it , but I’m still waiting on their “ swing “ vids ...
 

Vistalite Black

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My understanding is the beatification process leading to sainthood requires only three miraculous acts. Thus, it was enough for Neil to elevate Rush to success (with THAT singer), write amazing lyrics and fill arenas with overly long Noodly Doodly into the 2000s (unmatched in that regard). He didn’t need to swing, too!
 

BennyK

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Peart embraced the libertarian philosophy of Ayn Rand and as the saying goes," we attract who we are " . Enter Lee and Lifeson .During the early 70's the GTA , especially Scarborough, was a virtual paradise for adolescents with musical aspirations .

Before Rush , he worked very hard to perfect his style , leaving small town Ontario behind for England with nothing more than his own backbone to lean on . This deserves my respect .

Rush's music wasn't / isn't my cuppa tea , not because it was substandard or his drumming wasn't the best for it , but because my preference happened to be somewhere else .

Some like this, some like that ... hey, I'm all for diversity .
 
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bigbonzo

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Peart embraced the libertarian philosophy of Ayn Rand and as the saying goes," we attract who we are " . Enter Lee and Lifeson .During the early 70's the GTA , especially Scarborough, was a virtual paradise for adolescents with musical aspirations .

Before Rush , he worked very hard to perfect his style , leaving small town Ontario behind for England with nothing more than his own backbone to lean on . This deserves my respect .

Rush's music wasn't / isn't my cuppa tea , not because it was substandard or his drumming wasn't the best for it , but because my preference happened to be somewhere else .

Some like this, some like that ... hey, I'm all for diversity .
Neil followed Ayn Rand's philosophy only during the 1970's. Since then he had said numerous times that he no longer believed or followed it.
 
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Deafmoon

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I don't often see Michael Giles mentioned anywhere . Peart assembled his orchestral motifs and symphonic textures within a similar rock orientated articulation .

Krupa bridged the threshold for the following generations , Palmer Giles Baker Bruford ( all Brits BTW)did the same for drummers like Peart . So what exactly did he do to expand the horizon for those who came after ? Good question .
Another very cool Giles album to seek out.
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Vistalite Black

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Neil followed Ayn Rand's philosophy only during the 1970's. Since then he had said numerous times that he no longer believed or followed it.
Quoting from On Neil Young and Ayn Rand (https://mutant12.wordpress.com/english/156-2/):

That common theme – the bridge between Ayn Rand’s work and Rush lyrics – can be perceived in many Rush songs throughout the 80s and the 90s. Here are a few quotations by way of illustration:

from the obvious His mind is not for rent,

to perverse Those who know what’s best for us must rise and save us from ourselves,

to Everybody got to elevate from the norm,

to I’m not giving up on implausible dreams,

to Curves and lines of great designs,

to A spirit with a vision is a dream with the mission,

to Show me don’t tell me,

to I’m young enough to remember the future and the way things ought to be,

to my favourite: Hero is the voice of reason against the howling mob.
 


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