The best "heavy" metal snare drums, as compiled by DCP

Markkuliini

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Sound great unaccompanied but those tasty tones have a habit of disappearing when the band starts . In the studio, OK . or on a video like the one we just saw .
Huh? In my experience these are precisely the snares that combine the cut and tone specifically well, and sound full even with loud bands.
That is exactly their forte, not weakness. Don't know what drums you have tried but my Gretsch bell brass or DW Edge for instance are THE drums that I would choose if I want the drum to have lot of tone at higher volumes too. You can hear it REALLY well through the band, but not so that it would be too piercing like some thin shelled snares at loud volumes.
Surprised to hear your experience, since I have exactly the opposite kinds.
 

BennyK

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Huh? In my experience these are precisely the snares that combine the cut and tone specifically well, and sound full even with loud bands.
That is exactly their forte, not weakness. Don't know what drums you have tried but my Gretsch bell brass or DW Edge for instance are THE drums that I would choose if I want the drum to have lot of tone at higher volumes too. You can hear it REALLY well through the band, but not so that it would be too piercing like some thin shelled snares at loud volumes.
Surprised to hear your experience, since I have exactly the opposite kinds.
Mostly bars with on the average 2-300 seating capacity , usually someone in the band set up the PA/sound . Loud to very loud blues/rock country funk x 30 years . It was only later in my career when I started scoring gigs with a quieter jazz-like or roots style ambience and thin walled aluminum snares like the Acrolite or Gretsch were the most predictably consistent for brushes , though I'll give a tip of my hat to the Gretsch 4160 for brass shelled .
 

Markkuliini

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Mostly bars with on the average 2-300 seating capacity , usually someone in the band set up the PA/sound . Loud to very loud blues/rock country funk x 30 years . It was only later in my career when I started scoring gigs with a quieter jazz-like or roots style ambience and thin walled aluminum snares like the Acrolite or Gretsch were the most predictably consistent for brushes , though I'll give a tip of my hat to the Gretsch 4160 for brass shelled .
Which thick shelled snares have you been gigging with?
 
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BennyK

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I've had the Pearl Reference both brass and steeel, Pearl Ultra Cast aluminum and Keplinger-Ayotte stainless .

I've been off the bar scene for a while , but I don't imagine things have changed snare soundwise . These days my go to drums are a TAMA 6.5 steel Kingbeat and a Pearl FreeFloater with an acrylic shell . I spent a lifetime looking for the perfect all round drum and these two come closer to anything else for predictable versatility .
 
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Markkuliini

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I've had the Pearl Reference both brass and steeel, Pearl Ultra Cast aluminum and Keplinger-Ayotte stainless .

I've been off the bar scene for a while , but I don't imagine things have changed snare soundwise .
And to be clear, you couldn't hear their tone over the band?
I find this baffling since thick shelled snares have very high volume ceiling, meaning that you can keep hitting them much harder without choking them. That they specifically deliver both tone and cut at high volumes, as opposed to thin shelled snares that start to distort, choke and sound thin when you play then above certain volume threshold.
I have tested those thick steel and aluminum Pearl snares and to me they sounded bit cold, but the Keplinger I tested sounded very loud, fat and cutting at the same time. Maybe your mind would change with a deep bell brass snare that has more rich over tones than steel and especially aluminum.
But hey, everyone's ears are different.
 

BennyK

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To me, tone and volume aren't always the same thing . All those nice things I may hear on the retail floor, or in the video we've just heard can get lost . Studio, that's a different case, where what you hear, what the microphones hear and how well the engineer can bring those together is decisive .

Don't misunderstand me, I think the belll brass is a magnificent snare drum . At 11:30 pm when the joint is jumping and the band is up to its ears in everything, tone may not make it past the first ten feet of the stage .
 

JDA

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Too much attention paid to snare drum!!
it's a trap ! it's a trap!

who want to carry how many lbs?!
Michael Shrieve, Ian Paice, Bill Kreutzmann, Elvin Jones, Art Blakey, Max Roach...made their names...
thru the playing, without such fusss.
It's a giant marketing Sucking Suction Devil Vortex!!!!!
 
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Markkuliini

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To me, tone and volume aren't always the same thing . All those nice things I may hear on the retail floor, or in the video we've just heard can get lost . Studio, that's a different case, where what you hear, what the microphones hear and how well the engineer can bring those together is decisive .

Don't misunderstand me, I think the belll brass is a magnificent snare drum . At 11:30 pm when the joint is jumping and the band is up to its ears in everything, tone may not make it past the first ten feet of the stage .
No one claimed that the tone and volume are the save thing. I specifically wrote that these are drums that provide lots of tone also at higher volumes, at volumes where most thin shelled snares start to sound too snappy and all top end.
And they are designed so that the tone carries farther than with thin shelled snares. It's basic physics really.

Very often when I've heard a drummer who's sound really carries across the big room acoustically, it's been a thick shelled snare they have been playing. And I myself have never ever experienced my thick metal snares losing tone when the band kicks in. Been playing them for 10 years, and every time I'm amazed how well their whole tone gets heard.
 

Markkuliini

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who want to carry how many lbs?!
Michael Shrieve, Ian Paice, Bill Kreutzmann, Elvin Jones, Art Blakey, Max Roach...made their names...
Funny that you mentioned many drummers who play or played big kits. They weight a lot. And then your ask who want to carry many lbs. Well, apparently the guys you mentioned do. Lol.

The extra 6 to 10 pounds that a cast snare weights is easily countered by having one tom or cymbal+stand less on your kit. If the weight is really that important, then just have a smaller kit.
 

JDA

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None of those drummers played "big" kits!

Elvin did play a Tama bell Brass later in his career; but sure he did it for the fun of it
- as he'd always graciously play the top line- of whomever he was (asked to) endorsed by.

he's special.
I daresay these drums in the vid are for drummers more inspired - by drums - than by drummers. Some may see that as bassackwards,
Improve your (drumming) self- great drummers made their names on common drums.
It's the drummers not the particular drums. Their and those drums were are available to anyone.

The more exotic a drum you need (think you need) the less a drummer you may actually be.
Majority of history were done on common available to anyone- drums.
So the case for the drums alone- is weak.
Unless you believe yourself - your self-worth as a drummer- is to be a hardened forever amateur.
That "needs" exotic or specialized "equipment".. (count me Out I play the same readily available brand equipment the greats did 50 years ago. It's the drummer that makes the difference. Not the drum; once you acquire a professional level of drums and cymbals. (Some don't even need that) but generally that is sufficient - to then develop yourself.
 
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Markkuliini

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None of those drummers played "big" kits!

Elvin did play a Tama bell Brass later in his career; but sure he did it for the fun of it
- as he'd always graciously play the top line- of whomever he was (asked to) endorsed by.

he's special.
I daresay these drums in the vid are for drummers more inspired - by drums - than by drummers. Some may see that as bassackwards,
Improve your (drumming) self- great drummers made their names on common drums.
It's the drummers not the particular drums. Their and those drums were are available to anyone.

The more exotic a drum you need (think you need) the less a drummer you may actually be.
Majority of history were done on common available to anyone- drums.
So the case for the drums alone- is weak.
Unless you believe yourself - your self-worth as a drummer- is to be a hardened forever amateur.
That "needs" exotic or specialized "equipment".. (count me Out I play the same readily available brand equipment the greats did 50 years ago. It's the drummer that makes the difference. Not the drum; once you acquire a professional level of drums and cymbals. (Some don't even need that) but generally that is sufficient - to then develop yourself.
Thanks for the "advice". Lol.
Pretty bold to criticize others ability as drummer (that you have never heard play) if they are for instance into bell brass snares. And in the previous sentence you defend Elvin for using one, because you "know" that he did just to please his endorser, or just "for the fun of it". Yeah sure, the sound of these drums cannot have anything to do with this. Man, you're hilarious!

Here's some photos of the small kits that the drummers you mentioned used. Oh these tiny kits with "common drums". :lol:

Ian Paice

340px-Deep_Purple_-_MN_Gredos_-_05.jpg


Elvin's kit
qo5h1qhuululcszxannu.jpg



Bill Kreutzmann
Bill Kreutzmann 071484-1-L.jpg


Michael Shrieve
Michael-Shrieve-Santana-IV-Pic-Chad-Tasky.jpg



Even Art went big at some point.
764930eb12940420c47e16ad588d7c27.jpg


And Max added 3rd tom later in his career.
320px-Max_Roach_Keystone_1979.jpg



Compared to my kit these are all bigger and heavier, even if I might bring a bell brass along.

And one more LOL. :laughing6:
 
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JDA

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Here's some photos of the small kits that the drummers you mentioned used. Oh these tiny kits with "common drums
you score a perfect 6 for 6 :
Those all are Later Pictures of those drummers Kits - well after becoming well known.

They each became well-known on other drums; smaller common drums..
 
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Markkuliini

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you score a perfect 6 for 6 :
Those all are Later Pictures of those drummers Kits - well after becoming well known.

They each became well-known on other drums; smaller common drums..

Don't see why it's relevant, if they became famous playing smaller kits. You shouted "None of those drummers played "big" kits!" and I called you for it since it's not true. Almost all of them played big kit.
 

Ptrick

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None of those drummers played "big" kits!

Elvin did play a Tama bell Brass later in his career; but sure he did it for the fun of it
- as he'd always graciously play the top line- of whomever he was (asked to) endorsed by.

he's special.
I daresay these drums in the vid are for drummers more inspired - by drums - than by drummers. Some may see that as bassackwards,
Improve your (drumming) self- great drummers made their names on common drums.
It's the drummers not the particular drums. Their and those drums were are available to anyone.

The more exotic a drum you need (think you need) the less a drummer you may actually be.
Majority of history were done on common available to anyone- drums.
So the case for the drums alone- is weak.
Unless you believe yourself - your self-worth as a drummer- is to be a hardened forever amateur.
That "needs" exotic or specialized "equipment".. (count me Out I play the same readily available brand equipment the greats did 50 years ago. It's the drummer that makes the difference. Not the drum; once you acquire a professional level of drums and cymbals. (Some don't even need that) but generally that is sufficient - to then develop yourself.
Hey Joe, take everything you just said, but replace the topic with “old k’s”, and maybe you’ll understand how others might have a different viewpoint.
 

JDA

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"None of those drummers played "big" kits!" and I called you
I said- what they were playing- when they became known
Funny that you mentioned many drummers who play or played big kits.
None of those drummers played "big" kits!
Michael Shrieve, Ian Paice, Bill Kreutzmann, Elvin Jones, Art Blakey, Max Roach...made their names...
thru the playing, without such fusss.
when they became "known" they were not playing big or exotic or specialized kits.
They were playing stock off the shelf commonly-accessed- stuff..
You can't jump ahead 15 years - after they were established and say " see? see?"..


No.
 
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JDA

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JDA

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^ he means Wiffle..

My '66 Gretsch Brass is going to have to Do..when I want Metal


 
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