"The Devil Went Down To Georgia" Drummer.

Nacci

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I was listening to this on the radio yesterday and though, man what a great and original drumming performance and.....what the hell, is he playing brushes? I never heard a drummer cook a set of brushes like that. I gave a cursory look on the net but couldn't find out who the drummer was ......and everyone covering this song was doing it with sticks.

This guy needs some credit.


 

Vistalite Black

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Discogs.com credits drums and percussion on that 41-year-old album to Fred Edwards and James W. Marshall.

I believe Daniels' band pointlessly had two drummers at that time. Does it make the record sound like the drummer has four arms?

 

blueshadow

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Musically I think it's a great song, but I've never liked it. There's other songs that have been overplayed as much as this one and that I still like but this one just never like it....but yes what I've always hear is brushes on the verse and sticks on the chorus.... I checked wickipedia and the two drummers VB mentions are consistent there as well.

Also wicki had this:

The song is written in the key of D minor. Vassar Clements originally wrote the basic melody an octave lower, in a tune called "Lonesome Fiddle Blues" released on Clements' self-titled 1975 album on which Charlie Daniels played guitar. The Charlie Daniels Band moved it up an octave and put words to it.

Hadn't heard of this song before.
 

frankmott

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It DOES sound like two drummers; one with brushes (just him during the verses), and one with sticks (just him during the jams/bridges), and both during the choruses. Of course it was likely double tracked. Easy enough in the studio to pull up the brush volume to match.
 

ThomFloor

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The song is written in the key of D minor. Vassar Clements originally wrote the basic melody an octave lower, in a tune called "Lonesome Fiddle Blues" released on Clements' self-titled 1975 album on which Charlie Daniels played guitar. The Charlie Daniels Band moved it up an octave and put words to it.
I wonder how this would fare in the modern lawsuit era.
 

bongomania

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Most of the high profile lawsuits in the news were over songs written or recorded in the 60s and 70s, so...
 

bellbrass

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I think the drumming on "The South's Gonna Do It" is stellar. Freddie Edwards and Gary Allen are cookin' in that one. I actually practice along to that one regularly.
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Wiki shows personnel on that album as:

"James W. Marshall - drums, percussion"

Great damn song! Love that walking bass line and electric funk guitar.......
 

multijd

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Discogs.com credits drums and percussion on that 41-year-old album to Fred Edwards and James W. Marshall.

I believe Daniels' band pointlessly had two drummers at that time. Does it make the record sound like the drummer has four arms?

It seems that Charlie Daniels didn’t think that having two drummers was “pointless”.
 

Houndog

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Country musicians have so much talent , I grew up hating it and funny enough my 1st gigs were
country gigs , I quickly developed a love for the genre ...

I've never had a drummer who's played country gigs ask me how to shuffle .
The Rock guys however ,I've taught several how to shuffle and it really kicks their butt.
 

snappy

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I remember charting it out and playing it with no rehearsals because a guest fiddle player was coming in for one show.
Not easy at all.
I nailed it.
The fiddle player nailed it.
I was so immersed in the chart and counting like a MoFo I had to be told the bass player didnt put it the work and stunk it up.
A great song.
Fun to play.
That was a challenge.
 

shuffle

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Country musicians have so much talent , I grew up hating it and funny enough my 1st gigs were
country gigs , I quickly developed a love for the genre ...

I've never had a drummer who's played country gigs ask me how to shuffle .
The Rock guys however ,I've taught several how to shuffle and it really kicks their butt.
Ive always laugh at Rock drummers telling me how simple blues and country songs are to play.
I then tell them: do a double shuffle or a Ray Price shuffle for 4 minutes,dont do anything else! They panick and cant do it!
 

Houndog

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Ive always laugh at Rock drummers telling me how simple blues and country songs are to play.
I then tell them: do a double shuffle or a Ray Price shuffle for 4 minutes,dont do anything else! They panick and cant do it!
Those guys can't do "anything" for 4 minutes !!!!!
 

Doof

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That song is a real work out physically. It’s the only one I played where I had to remember my breathing, or I would be gassed at the end of it. We had a 22 year old young lady in our band at the time, about 10 years ago. She was a classically trained violinist, but she could really rip that song out note for note. The audience really loved her.

Very fun song to play for a lot of reasons.
 

drummer5359

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Early the morning of July 2, 1979 I got into my 1972 Buick Skylark and headed toward Miami Florida. My father had terminal lung cancer, I took a leave of absence from my job in Pittsburgh to spend the last of his days with him.

I was twenty years old, and the Buick was not in stellar shape. I drove the speed limit all of the way there to save the car and save gas. This was at the height of the second gas crisis.

The Buick had an AM radio. Back then the AM dial was still full of pop stations, and in the south, country stations. When I pulled out of Pittsburgh one of the first songs that I heard was, "The devil went down to Georgia". When that station faded I found the next station and heard "The devil went down to Georgia". My trip to Florida took me through Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and yes, Georgia. When a station faded, I'd find another and get to hear it again and again. When I'd find a gas station and wait in line I could hear it coming from other people's cars.

It was around noon on July the fourth when I pulled into Miami. I honestly can't tell you how many times I heard that song on that trip, but it was too many. And to this day I can't hear the song without being transported back to that Skylark in the first week of July of 1979.
 


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