The Drum Solo Discussion Thread

Matched Gripper

DFO Veteran
Joined
May 28, 2019
Messages
2,168
Reaction score
1,889
Philly Joe Jones solos with transcriptions. For me, this is very musical drum soloing with only snare, FT, BD, hats and ride cymbal on most of these. Check out #2 from Salt Peanuts. Amazing, innovative, original.

 

StatesboroBlue

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2021
Messages
54
Reaction score
17
Philly Joe Jones solos with transcriptions. For me, this is very musical drum soloing with only snare, FT, BD, hats and ride cymbal on most of these. Check out #2 from Salt Peanuts. Amazing, innovative, original.

Yup. Much more likeable for me. I made it all the way to the end. I can't say that about any of the others posted here. And the drums sound like real drums. Hey, I like modern recordings too, but it's nice to hear something organic.
 

JDA

DFO Star
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Messages
22,924
Reaction score
11,834
Location
Jeannette, Pa.
Philly Joe Jones solos with transcriptions. For me, this is very musical drum soloing with only snare, FT, BD, hats and ride cymbal on most of these. Check out #2 from Salt Peanuts. Amazing, innovative, original.

either my Sound Card is running fast or all those seem tweaked a Bit-Sharp speedwise from the originals??
 

Jay-Dee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2021
Messages
155
Reaction score
172
Location
Aus
Not my thing. Cheesy and sounds like a montage of cartoon sound effects.
You're a hard marker but each to their own, surely you were at least mildly impressed by the 5/4 bar though :). I never said it was a world beater, just that it is very simple and works in that song. (late edit) He used Simmons drums with acoustics and numerous percussive chimes, bells etc back then which is likely the cartoon sound effects you mention.

I'm willing to bet that the crowd gets into it every time he plays it live though. Like I said earlier, it doesn't take much to impress an audience.
 
Last edited:

Jay-Dee

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2021
Messages
155
Reaction score
172
Location
Aus
I live in Oklahoma and I’ve heard of them .
That’s saying something!!!!
That's cool, it's really pleasing when Aussies do well or are known outside Australia, especially musicians/bands.
 

Rufus T Firefly

Very well Known Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2008
Messages
695
Reaction score
565
Location
Winamac, Indiana
Yes I solo.

I started soloing pretty much as soon as I got my first kit. I started simple learning the In-a-gadda-da-vidda solo. When I got my Premier double bass kit I learned the solo in the lengthy album version of "Get Ready" by Rare Earth. From then on I've created my own solos.

I'm pretty much rock / blues. Not good enough to play Jazz. LOL.

I plan out my solos before a performance - don't trust myself enough to free lance. That being said I determine the length of the solo entirely be gauging the reaction of the audience. I don't want to become a bore. Generally anywhere between 3 to 8 minutes or so. I do prefer to incorporate a solo within a song as opposed to a stand alone solo.

Not sure what you mean by phrasing a solo.

Nice thread.
 

kevmill70

Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
14
I prefer “solos” that continue with the groove and phrasing of the song, have some sort of structure that are part of the song and are not simply an excuse for a chops showcase.


...the full-on, drum set on a cherry-picker, spinning around like a carnival ride solo just doesn’t interest me much.

That said a lot of jazz solos can be quite musical, but for me the traditional rock solo... I unfortunately have the image of Chad Smith wearing a metal hard hat with a flame shooting out of it. Kind of sadly sums up the genre.

View attachment 496984

In rainbow moments of introspection I’ve asked myself: If I woke up tomorrow and suddenly had blinding speed, talent, and coordination would I demand to get to play a solo? It’s a question I avoid answering. Fortunately, and with some sadness and a tinge of envy, it’s a rhetorical one.
I defy anyone to get up and try to play an entertaining solo in front of 20,000 people that doesn't look like a carnival ride. 95% of your audience aren't drummers and just want to have a good time. That being said, and I'll use Chad Smith, since you mentioned him, a flaming had hat kinda cheapens the raw talent that he has. He can groove with the best of them and he's also fun to watch. To me, the pinnacle of solos outside of the jazz world is Tommy Aldridge. Not too long, has an audience participation part, and shows off what he does best. Also, it is something he wrote like 40 years ago and still does today -- why mess with near-perfection?
 

funkypoodle

DFO Veteran
Joined
May 29, 2013
Messages
2,682
Reaction score
1,110
Location
Québec, Canada
I enjoy soloing over a groove, taking chances, opening things up, without overdoing it. Here's an example of what I really like to hear solo-wise. Joe Dukes just kills on this fabulous Jack McDuff track. Jazzy but muscular & you can hear the fun being had!
 

jptrickster

DFO Star
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
10,246
Reaction score
3,954
Location
Fairfield County
Stormy night upstate CT Marble Dale Pub we were running late finally got all setup. Just before T off power went down, opened the show with a 25 minute solo. Thank god haven't ever had to do that again. Now I do a few shorties or longer depending on my mood throughout the night Allman tunes mostly Memory Elizabeth Reed, One Way Out, Hot 'lanta it's all good.
 

paul

DFO Veteran
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
2,821
Reaction score
649
Location
Lewisville, TX
I do not understand the thinking of those who hate solos. How can you hate hearing your instrument being featured? Why should drums be treated differently from the other instruments in the band?

I've always felt that soloing is part of playing drums. Regardless of the genre, you have to expect that you're going to be called on to solo at some point. When that happens you just do your best to play something that fits and displays your instrument favorably, and preferably musically.
 

bpaluzzi

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
1,095
Reaction score
1,462
Location
SF Bay Area
I do not understand the thinking of those who hate solos. How can you hate hearing your instrument being featured? Why should drums be treated differently from the other instruments in the band?

- Drums are not by their nature a melodic instrument
- Drum solos are often quite different from other instrument solos - a guitar solo is taking place over the form of a song, with the rest of the band still playing. Drum solos are often "everyone leaves the stage and lets our drummer do their thing
- Most drummers are not good soloists, and think that playing the fastest stuff possible is how to make a good solo

If a guitar/horn solo meant the rest of the band leaving the stage, and the guitarist whipping through as many fast scales as they know, I wouldn't like those either.

There are people talking about playing 5 minute drum solos on their gigs. I can't think of anything less interesting or more self-indulgent for a weekend warrior band. I don't even want to sit through a Buddy Rich extended solo, but at least people going to those concerts know what they were getting into. At a local gig, if a drummer went into an 8 minute solo, I'd be out the door 5 minutes ago :icon_lol:
 

JimmySticks

DFO Veteran
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
1,844
Reaction score
2,205
Location
Queens NY
I do not understand the thinking of those who hate solos. How can you hate hearing your instrument being featured? Why should drums be treated differently from the other instruments in the band?

I've always felt that soloing is part of playing drums. Regardless of the genre, you have to expect that you're going to be called on to solo at some point. When that happens you just do your best to play something that fits and displays your instrument favorably, and preferably musically.
Although @bpaluzzi makes some valid points, I agree with your opinion.

I also think you might be called to solo at some point, so it's good to know how to put something together. And even if nobody ever hears your solo, I think it's a good exercise and good for your drumming skills to work on one. I'd like to be able to play one just for friends to listen to when they come over and ask you to play a little. It's just a great skill/talent to have.
 

RIDDIM

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
4,740
Reaction score
1,492
Location
MD
- Drums are not by their nature a melodic instrument
- Drum solos are often quite different from other instrument solos - a guitar solo is taking place over the form of a song, with the rest of the band still playing. Drum solos are often "everyone leaves the stage and lets our drummer do their thing
- Most drummers are not good soloists, and think that playing the fastest stuff possible is how to make a good solo

If a guitar/horn solo meant the rest of the band leaving the stage, and the guitarist whipping through as many fast scales as they know, I wouldn't like those either.

There are people talking about playing 5 minute drum solos on their gigs. I can't think of anything less interesting or more self-indulgent for a weekend warrior band. I don't even want to sit through a Buddy Rich extended solo, but at least people going to those concerts know what they were getting into. At a local gig, if a drummer went into an 8 minute solo, I'd be out the door 5 minutes ago :icon_lol:
Not being a more melodic instrument doesn't mean we can't think logically and develop things, either based on the melody of the piece we re' playing over, or if it's an open thing, based on a simple fragment we can biuld on over time. That's not a function of chops; it's a function of imagination, discipline, and musicality. It's possible to engage an audience that way.
 

bpaluzzi

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
1,095
Reaction score
1,462
Location
SF Bay Area
Not being a more melodic instrument doesn't mean we can't think logically and develop things, either based on the melody of the piece we re' playing over, or if it's an open thing, based on a simple fragment we can biuld on over time. That's not a function of chops; it's a function of imagination, discipline, and musicality. It's possible to engage an audience that way.
Oh, it's definitely possible. But theory and practice are two very different things. I can count on one hand the number of solos that I feel are engaging in that manner.
 

JDA

DFO Star
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Messages
22,924
Reaction score
11,834
Location
Jeannette, Pa.
Hi medium and Lo add in snare wires, add in hi hat pedaled cymbals, add in Chinese and Flat and Sizzle and crash ride.....
and if you can't think or play a thing melodic dude Can't help you
I forgot the cowbell and cymbal bells....



Physically, drums are capable of playing a melody, and some drummers also use their kit as a melodic instrument. But due to the drums’ overtones, it doesn’t feel like listening to harmonic notes because they don’t match the defined pitch that we expect to hear from a melodic instrument.
 
Last edited:

RIDDIM

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
4,740
Reaction score
1,492
Location
MD
Oh, it's definitely possible. But theory and practice are two very different things. I can count on one hand the number of solos that I feel are engaging in that manner.
Some are better at it than others. Jeff Hamilton and Art Blakey come to mind.
 


Top