The Jerry Allison Appreciation Club

exliontamer

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He's an architect. He invented, juxtaposed, & contextualized ideas that had never been done before. It's easy to take these things for granted when the influencer never got as much recognition as the people they influenced. Here's to Jerry and that entire crew. I know you people from Texas have a strange amount of pride. I'll give you brisket and Buddy Holly.

 

K.O.

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My band opened for the Crickets 3 times back in the 1980s. Jerry was a cool guy and a great drummer. Buddy Holly and the Crickets were a big influence on the Beatles and surely some of Jerry's style influenced Ringo's, who in turn influenced multitudes.
 

Tigerdrummer

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He's an architect. He invented, juxtaposed, & contextualized ideas that had never been done before. It's easy to take these things for granted when the influencer never got as much recognition as the people they influenced. Here's to Jerry and that entire crew. I know you people from Texas have a strange amount of pride. I'll give you brisket and Buddy Holly.

Great band and music. I dont think he touched a cymbal during Peggy Sue.
 

Way Out Wardell

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Had the pleasure of meeting him a couple of times. He really broke the paradigm of early rock drumming, from Peggy Sue, playing his knees on 'Everyday', a cardboard box on 'Not Fade Away'...
This is a rare clip of a show called Opry Almanac that features, among others, Roger Miller, Thumbs Carlille and at the 33 min mark an interview with Jerry.
 

RayB

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He's an architect. He invented, juxtaposed, & contextualized ideas that had never been done before. It's easy to take these things for granted when the influencer never got as much recognition as the people they influenced. Here's to Jerry and that entire crew. I know you people from Texas have a strange amount of pride. I'll give you brisket and Buddy Holly.

I always loved Buddy Hollg
He's an architect. He invented, juxtaposed, & contextualized ideas that had never been done before. It's easy to take these things for granted when the influencer never got as much recognition as the people they influenced. Here's to Jerry and that entire crew. I know you people from Texas have a strange amount of pride. I'll give you brisket and Buddy Holly.

I always loved Buddy Holly's music and considered the drums on "Peggy Sue" one of the most original and hip drum parts in rock music. In the few live Buddy Holly videos I've seen, I noticed Jerry
Had the pleasure of meeting him a couple of times. He really broke the paradigm of early rock drumming, from Peggy Sue, playing his knees on 'Everyday', a cardboard box on 'Not Fade Away'...
This is a rare clip of a show called Opry Almanac that features, among others, Roger Miller, Thumbs Carlille and at the 33 min mark an interview with Jerry.
I always loved those great Buddy Holly records and considered the drums on "Peggy Sue" one of the coolest rock drum tracks of all time. Just a great sound. On the few live Buddy Holly and the Crickets videos I've seen, it always struck me that in "Peggy Sue" Jerry Allison played a pretty abridged version of his drumming on the record. I understand that; there seems to be echo on the studio version and rather than try to duplicate the exact sound, it's easier to simplify it a little. Nonetheless, the drums on the studio version are flawless and not so easy to play.
I came across a discography of Panama Francis, a terrific swing drummer who got his start in the late 1940's in Cab Calloway's band. I saw him play a few times, one of those older cats who played a beautiful swing groove like he was Father Time himself. Panama Francis was also one of the few swing drummers who adjusted to the rock & roll groove in the 1950's-60's. He plays drums on all the Platter's big hits. Later he played drums on several Four Season's hits; all those iconic tom tom intros. Also played on Dion 's "Runaround Sue". And yes, he is credited with playing drums on "Peggy Sue", not Jerry Allison.
When I read that, I understood why the drums on the record sounded better than the live performances. This is not a knock on Jerry Allison; Francis was a more experienced studio drummer who knew how to get a great sound.
Truth is, black drummers like Panama Francis, Fred Below, and to a much greater degree, Earl Palmer, are the drummers frequently overlooked as the seminal rock & roll drummers. Beatles and Rolling Stones were knocked out by Little Richard, Fats Domino, and Chuck Berry. Ironically, lot's of American kids in the 60's heard those drum beats in the British Invasion, never realising Ringo, Charlie Watts and others were playing a version of Earl Palmer and Fred Below.
Earl Palmer was a terrific young tap dancer who became New Orleans busiest studio drummer in the 1950's. He played great bass drum parts with his dancing right foot. Go back and listen to his New Orleans drumming, what a feel he had!
 

K.O.

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Would love to know what model/series/sizes his cymbals &drums were & whether or not he used calfskin heads or plastic.
I've seen period pictures of him using both a WFL/Ludwig set and a Premier set with the Crickets. I'd guess calf heads at that time (late 50s) but you never know. I should have asked him when I had the chance but I wasn't thinking about such things at the time (mid 1980s). He used my set on two occasions (early 70's Ludwig Hollywood outfit) and his own set of newer 6 ply Ludwigs the third time we opened for them.
 

Matched Gripper

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He's an architect. He invented, juxtaposed, & contextualized ideas that had never been done before. It's easy to take these things for granted when the influencer never got as much recognition as the people they influenced. Here's to Jerry and that entire crew. I know you people from Texas have a strange amount of pride. I'll give you brisket and Buddy Holly.

Must be nice to get paid to practice your paradiddles.
 

RayB

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I
I always loved Buddy Hollg

I always loved Buddy Holly's music and considered the drums on "Peggy Sue" one of the most original and hip drum parts in rock music. In the few live Buddy Holly videos I've seen, I noticed Jerry

I always loved those great Buddy Holly records and considered the drums on "Peggy Sue" one of the coolest rock drum tracks of all time. Just a great sound. On the few live Buddy Holly and the Crickets videos I've seen, it always struck me that in "Peggy Sue" Jerry Allison played a pretty abridged version of his drumming on the record. I understand that; there seems to be echo on the studio version and rather than try to duplicate the exact sound, it's easier to simplify it a little. Nonetheless, the drums on the studio version are flawless and not so easy to play.
I came across a discography of Panama Francis, a terrific swing drummer who got his start in the late 1940's in Cab Calloway's band. I saw him play a few times, one of those older cats who played a beautiful swing groove like he was Father Time himself. Panama Francis was also one of the few swing drummers who adjusted to the rock & roll groove in the 1950's-60's. He plays drums on all the Platter's big hits. Later he played drums on several Four Season's hits; all those iconic tom tom intros. Also played on Dion 's "Runaround Sue". And yes, he is credited with playing drums on "Peggy Sue", not Jerry Allison.
When I read that, I understood why the drums on the record sounded better than the live performances. This is not a knock on Jerry Allison; Francis was a more experienced studio drummer who knew how to get a great sound.
Truth is, black drummers like Panama Francis, Fred Below, and to a much greater degree, Earl Palmer, are the drummers frequently overlooked as the seminal rock & roll drummers. Beatles and Rolling Stones were knocked out by Little Richard, Fats Domino, and Chuck Berry. Ironically, lot's of American kids in the 60's heard those drum beats in the British Invasion, never realising Ringo, Charlie Watts and others were playing a version of Earl Palmer and Fred Below.
Earl Palmer was a terrific young tap dancer who became New Orleans busiest studio drummer in the 1950's. He played great bass drum parts with his dancing right foot. Go back and listen to his New Orleans drumming, what a feel he had!
I need to apologize to all Jerry Allison fans for
I always loved Buddy Hollg

I always loved Buddy Holly's music and considered the drums on "Peggy Sue" one of the most original and hip drum parts in rock music. In the few live Buddy Holly videos I've seen, I noticed Jerry

I always loved those great Buddy Holly records and considered the drums on "Peggy Sue" one of the coolest rock drum tracks of all time. Just a great sound. On the few live Buddy Holly and the Crickets videos I've seen, it always struck me that in "Peggy Sue" Jerry Allison played a pretty abridged version of his drumming on the record. I understand that; there seems to be echo on the studio version and rather than try to duplicate the exact sound, it's easier to simplify it a little. Nonetheless, the drums on the studio version are flawless and not so easy to play.
I came across a discography of Panama Francis, a terrific swing drummer who got his start in the late 1940's in Cab Calloway's band. I saw him play a few times, one of those older cats who played a beautiful swing groove like he was Father Time himself. Panama Francis was also one of the few swing drummers who adjusted to the rock & roll groove in the 1950's-60's. He plays drums on all the Platter's big hits. Later he played drums on several Four Season's hits; all those iconic tom tom intros. Also played on Dion 's "Runaround Sue". And yes, he is credited with playing drums on "Peggy Sue", not Jerry Allison.
When I read that, I understood why the drums on the record sounded better than the live performances. This is not a knock on Jerry Allison; Francis was a more experienced studio drummer who knew how to get a great sound.
Truth is, black drummers like Panama Francis, Fred Below, and to a much greater degree, Earl Palmer, are the drummers frequently overlooked as the seminal rock & roll drummers. Beatles and Rolling Stones were knocked out by Little Richard, Fats Domino, and Chuck Berry. Ironically, lot's of American kids in the 60's heard those drum beats in the British Invasion, never realising Ringo, Charlie Watts and others were playing a version of Earl Palmer and Fred Below.
Earl Palmer was a terrific young tap dancer who became New Orleans busiest studio drummer in the 1950's. He played great bass drum parts with his dancing right foot. Go back and listen to his New Orleans drumming, what a feel he had!
I just apologize to all Jerry Allison fans and retract my statement that Panama Francis played drums on Peggy Sue. I read a bio of Panama that credits him with playing on that track, but I researched it further and found out it was, in fact, Jerry Allison on drums. Buddy Holly and the Crickets parted ways in 1958 and Buddy went to NY to record his next records. Panama Fancis played drums on some of those records. Some
I always loved Buddy Hollg

I always loved Buddy Holly's music and considered the drums on "Peggy Sue" one of the most original and hip drum parts in rock music. In the few live Buddy Holly videos I've seen, I noticed Jerry

I always loved those great Buddy Holly records and considered the drums on "Peggy Sue" one of the coolest rock drum tracks of all time. Just a great sound. On the few live Buddy Holly and the Crickets videos I've seen, it always struck me that in "Peggy Sue" Jerry Allison played a pretty abridged version of his drumming on the record. I understand that; there seems to be echo on the studio version and rather than try to duplicate the exact sound, it's easier to simplify it a little. Nonetheless, the drums on the studio version are flawless and not so easy to play.
I came across a discography of Panama Francis, a terrific swing drummer who got his start in the late 1940's in Cab Calloway's band. I saw him play a few times, one of those older cats who played a beautiful swing groove like he was Father Time himself. Panama Francis was also one of the few swing drummers who adjusted to the rock & roll groove in the 1950's-60's. He plays drums on all the Platter's big hits. Later he played drums on several Four Season's hits; all those iconic tom tom intros. Also played on Dion 's "Runaround Sue". And yes, he is credited with playing drums on "Peggy Sue", not Jerry Allison.
When I read that, I understood why the drums on the record sounded better than the live performances. This is not a knock on Jerry Allison; Francis was a more experienced studio drummer who knew how to get a great sound.
Truth is, black drummers like Panama Francis, Fred Below, and to a much greater degree, Earl Palmer, are the drummers frequently overlooked as the seminal rock & roll drummers. Beatles and Rolling Stones were knocked out by Little Richard, Fats Domino, and Chuck Berry. Ironically, lot's of American kids in the 60's heard those drum beats in the British Invasion, never realising Ringo, Charlie Watts and others were playing a version of Earl Palmer and Fred Below.
Earl Palmer was a terrific young tap dancer who became New Orleans busiest studio drummer in the 1950's. He played great bass drum parts with his dancing right foot. Go back and listen to his New Orleans drumming, what a feel he had!
 

richardh253

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He's an architect. He invented, juxtaposed, & contextualized ideas that had never been done before. It's easy to take these things for granted when the influencer never got as much recognition as the people they influenced. Here's to Jerry and that entire crew. I know you people from Texas have a strange amount of pride. I'll give you brisket and Buddy Holly.

Love watching his right hand in "Peggy Sue" - holding the stick so loose and letting it do much of the doubling. The kind of technique it would take me years to figure out.
 

RayB

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[QUOTE="RayB, post: 20

I must apologize to all Jerry Allison fans and retract my statement that Panama Francis played drums on Peggy Sue. I read a bio of Panama that credits him with playing on that track, but I researched it further and found out it was, in fact, Jerry Allison on drums. Buddy Holly and the Crickets parted ways in 1958 and Buddy went to NY to record his next records. Panama Francis played drums on some of those records. A biographer of Francis mistakenly assumed he played on earlier Buddy Holly records and I repeated the error. All credit goes to Jerry Allison for playing great drums on Peggy Sue and to the Coral engineer for mixing it beautifully.
I started playing drums because I was 11 when Beatlemania hit the states in late '63 and I figured I'd be Ringo. Nobody taught "rock" drums at the time and the jazz drummers who did teach drums mostly hated rock. I remember we all listened to Beatle and Stones records to figure out what Ringo and Charlie Watts were doing. We were a little too young to realize the English guys were interpreting what Earl Palmer and Fred Below played on earlier American records. The fact is so many of what we called rock beats were first played by African American drummers who were primarily jazz drummers. Nor did we think the iconic tom parts on the Four Seasons records were played by Panama Francis, a guy from the swing era.
Whenever I dug how a drummer played, I always wanted to know who he listened to. Over the years, I ended up going through every decade of drumming going back to Baby Dodds in the 20's. Equally important to go forward until now.
I try to resist the judgement that the hero drummers from my era were the best; it's not really true and it makes for a grumpy person.
[/QUOTE]
 

evilw

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Before I could walk, I would crawl to my parents Hi-Fi on the floor and play my favorite song, Peggy Sue. For years they couldn't understand how I knew which 45 record it was, so I finally told them that it was the only bright orange CORAL label in the stack. I always credited that song for me wanting to be a drummer.
Years passed and I was visiting my cousins in North Hollywood. My 1st cousin Gwen had married a young Louisiana guitar/baseman named Joe Osborn who I grew up with as "my cousin Joe". He had become a very successful session man as a member of the Wrecking Crew, so it was always a thrill for me to be there. He gave me priceless advice on how to approach the drummer's role.
Joe had this buddy named "J.I." who was around often. He drove a cool old pickup with a propane tank in the back for fuel. He had been to my parents home in Bakersfield to ask my brother about making wine. During one visit, he was looking at my drums and I was showing him my Rogers set and playing a bit. He mentioned that he had "this old Premier set" that he should probably replace. I chuckled and agreed.
Some time later I was talking with Gwen when she said "Oh Billy, you know that song you loved as a little boy called Peggy Sue? JI wrote that about his 1st wife". At that moment, my head spun like the Regan in the "Exorcist" as it donned on me that good ole "JI" was F'ing Jerry Ivan Allison from the Crickets and that the "old Premier Kit was one that he had played back in the day! My head is still spinning and he is still a great Hero of mine!
-EW
 


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