The Joy Of Listening & Beautiful Ian Paice

DavedrumsTX

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Messages
88
Reaction score
82
Location
Dallas, Texas
Like many around the world, the COVID-19 Epidemic has had negative impacts to our world and society to numerous to list. However, one positive, personal outcome for me has been my daily 4 mile walk. During this time, I try to re-discover albums that I bought and listened to many years ago. Like many, I had fallen into the habit of just listening to songs via iTunes. Playlists and shuffle. While I realize this has its purpose, I also realize I had lost the joy and experience of listening to full albums like I did in the 70s and 80s. With this said, I have started listening to full albums(double LPs sometimes take two walking sessions) while I walk. Needless to say, I have rediscovered the joy of listening again. I love hearing songs that don't make the seriusXM playlist and to hearing drum parts, fill etc. that I have long forgotten.

With that said, one of my first listenings was to Deep Purple's 1972 Made in Japan album. I originally bought this on 8 track when it came out and could only play it on the Quadraphonic player in my parent's 63 Rambler(No AC, vinyl seats, rust, but a killer sound system). I was a young kid at the time and was just starting to study and play drums. While I loved the album and was amazed by Ian's lightning fast chops, I ashamedly admit I did not fully appreciate him. Listening to the album 48 years later, I was blown away by the songs, the band and most of all Ian. A mere 24 years years of age at the time, Ian's playing on Made in Japan is simply a work of art and a years worth of drumming lessons. While his solo on the Mule qualifies him as a serious nominee for being the Buddy Rich of hard rock, his groove, swing and musicality are impeccable. His playing on Strange Kind of Woman is extremely tight and he lays down a canvas for the rest of the band to paint. A masterpiece!

I hope anyone reading this takes the time to rediscover the lost art of listening to albums in their entirety and that it makes you smile and inspires you to fall in love with your drums again.

Peace,

David
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2020
Messages
150
Reaction score
205
MIJ is one rock&roll masterpiece. The song that does it for me on this album is "Lazy". When the band get back on the main riff at the end, well the level of energy deployed is just E-P-I-C... Just as Nigel Tufnell would say: "These go to eleven"... Everything goes to 11 in a steam-rolling, take no prisonners fashion. That's NOT your uncle Burt's tired ol' cover band unconvincingly playing some Dire Strait song at the local county fair. This is a lean mean fighting machine , set on conquering the world, fueld by distilled badassery, virtuosity and cockyness. And conquer, they did, my friends...

Every student of rock looking for inspiration, as well as any veteran who has kinda lost the inner fire should definitely listen to that album every now and then. Just to be reminded what rock used to be about.

P.S. no disrespect meant to my older friends in cover bands, that was just an image, we all know a few bands that are just going through the motions with no excitement whatsoever, young or old. But I know some older folks who can still rock hard when the song demands it as well. ;-)
 

DavedrumsTX

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Messages
88
Reaction score
82
Location
Dallas, Texas
MIJ is one rock&roll masterpiece. The song that does it for me on this album is "Lazy". When the band get back on the main riff at the end, well the level of energy deployed is just E-P-I-C... Just as Nigel Tufnell would say: "These go to eleven"... Everything goes to 11 in a steam-rolling, take no prisonners fashion. That's NOT your uncle Burt's tired ol' cover band unconvincingly playing some Dire Strait song at the local county fair. This is a lean mean fighting machine , set on conquering the world, fueld by distilled badassery, virtuosity and cockyness. And conquer, they did, my friends...

Every student of rock looking for inspiration, as well as any veteran who has kinda lost the inner fire should definitely listen to that album every now and then. Just to be reminded what rock used to be about.

P.S. no disrespect meant to my older friends in cover bands, that was just an image, we all know a few bands that are just going through the motions with no excitement whatsoever, young or old. But I know some older folks who can still rock hard when the song demands it as well. ;-)
Thank you for your comments Damn. The whole album is bloody good. To your point, at 57 I have reignited my inner fire!
 

joetires

Active Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2020
Messages
28
Reaction score
21
Like many around the world, the COVID-19 Epidemic has had negative impacts to our world and society to numerous to list. However, one positive, personal outcome for me has been my daily 4 mile walk. During this time, I try to re-discover albums that I bought and listened to many years ago. Like many, I had fallen into the habit of just listening to songs via iTunes. Playlists and shuffle. While I realize this has its purpose, I also realize I had lost the joy and experience of listening to full albums like I did in the 70s and 80s. With this said, I have started listening to full albums(double LPs sometimes take two walking sessions) while I walk. Needless to say, I have rediscovered the joy of listening again. I love hearing songs that don't make the seriusXM playlist and to hearing drum parts, fill etc. that I have long forgotten.

With that said, one of my first listenings was to Deep Purple's 1972 Made in Japan album. I originally bought this on 8 track when it came out and could only play it on the Quadraphonic player in my parent's 63 Rambler(No AC, vinyl seats, rust, but a killer sound system). I was a young kid at the time and was just starting to study and play drums. While I loved the album and was amazed by Ian's lightning fast chops, I ashamedly admit I did not fully appreciate him. Listening to the album 48 years later, I was blown away by the songs, the band and most of all Ian. A mere 24 years years of age at the time, Ian's playing on Made in Japan is simply a work of art and a years worth of drumming lessons. While his solo on the Mule qualifies him as a serious nominee for being the Buddy Rich of hard rock, his groove, swing and musicality are impeccable. His playing on Strange Kind of Woman is extremely tight and he lays down a canvas for the rest of the band to paint. A masterpiece!

I hope anyone reading this takes the time to rediscover the lost art of listening to albums in their entirety and that it makes you smile and inspires you to fall in love with your drums again.

Peace,

David
Nice ! My dad had a 65 Rambler. Yes I love live DP and have been pulling the older live material as well. Love the long jams they did. Ian P a great powerful drummer who may have been over shadowed by Carl palmer at the time. I also love the Tommy Bolin DP era. Joe
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2020
Messages
150
Reaction score
205
Good for you, we ALL need a good kick in the butt every now and then. And to expand on your original comment: Rediscovering the magic of just listening to albums and what made us fall in love with music in the first place, that is gold! Congrats on the re-newed passion ...
 

DavedrumsTX

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Messages
88
Reaction score
82
Location
Dallas, Texas
Nice ! My dad had a 65 Rambler. Yes I love live DP and have been pulling the older live material as well. Love the long jams they did. Ian P a great powerful drummer who may have been over shadowed by Carl palmer at the time. I also love the Tommy Bolin DP era. Joe
Carl was a big influence for me as well, but he was always stiffer and didn't swing the way Ian did. Of course ELP was playing classical rock, so a more stiff style was appropriate. I think Burn is Ian's best recording. The title track alone is amazing.
 

joetires

Active Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2020
Messages
28
Reaction score
21
Carl was a big influence for me as well, but he was always stiffer and didn't swing the way Ian did. Of course ELP was playing classical rock, so a more stiff style was appropriate. I think Burn is Ian's best recording. The title track alone is amazing.
I agree his playing is great on Burn. You don't hear many bands playing a Burn cover.
 

DavedrumsTX

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Messages
88
Reaction score
82
Location
Dallas, Texas
Uber cool dad! I credit my dad(who is 92) with introducing me to Gene Krupa. He also took me back stage at an Ella Fitzgerald show with Count Basie where I got to meet them. Thank you dad as well!!!
 

joetires

Active Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2020
Messages
28
Reaction score
21
Uber cool dad! I credit my dad(who is 92) with introducing me to Gene Krupa. He also took me back stage at an Ella Fitzgerald show with Count Basie where I got to meet them. Thank you dad as well!!!
Oh man my Dad was always by my musical side and to be honest made me the player I am today. Sadly he passed at 78 but everyday I pick up my sticks I see him and my mom smiling. Huge support to my music and the original music I have played for many years with my life long musical brother here in Ct. Still going back and forth between a Pearl Masters Complete or Tama Starclassic maple..
 

Bob Salvati

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2019
Messages
16
Reaction score
7
Like many around the world, the COVID-19 Epidemic has had negative impacts to our world and society to numerous to list. However, one positive, personal outcome for me has been my daily 4 mile walk. During this time, I try to re-discover albums that I bought and listened to many years ago. Like many, I had fallen into the habit of just listening to songs via iTunes. Playlists and shuffle. While I realize this has its purpose, I also realize I had lost the joy and experience of listening to full albums like I did in the 70s and 80s. With this said, I have started listening to full albums(double LPs sometimes take two walking sessions) while I walk. Needless to say, I have rediscovered the joy of listening again. I love hearing songs that don't make the seriusXM playlist and to hearing drum parts, fill etc. that I have long forgotten.

With that said, one of my first listenings was to Deep Purple's 1972 Made in Japan album. I originally bought this on 8 track when it came out and could only play it on the Quadraphonic player in my parent's 63 Rambler(No AC, vinyl seats, rust, but a killer sound system). I was a young kid at the time and was just starting to study and play drums. While I loved the album and was amazed by Ian's lightning fast chops, I ashamedly admit I did not fully appreciate him. Listening to the album 48 years later, I was blown away by the songs, the band and most of all Ian. A mere 24 years years of age at the time, Ian's playing on Made in Japan is simply a work of art and a years worth of drumming lessons. While his solo on the Mule qualifies him as a serious nominee for being the Buddy Rich of hard rock, his groove, swing and musicality are impeccable. His playing on Strange Kind of Woman is extremely tight and he lays down a canvas for the rest of the band to paint. A masterpiece!

I hope anyone reading this takes the time to rediscover the lost art of listening to albums in their entirety and that it makes you smile and inspires you to fall in love with your drums again.

Peace,

David
Paice and Bonham are my all time favorites.
 

hsosdrum

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2020
Messages
494
Reaction score
733
I always thought Paicey grooved MUCH better than Palmer (whose stiffness and lack of feel ruined Asia, IMHO). And speaking of Palmer and Cobham, in March of 1972 I saw ELP at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium — Mahavishnu Orchestra (with Cobham) was the opening act!
 

hsosdrum

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2020
Messages
494
Reaction score
733
What a show!!!
Indeed it was! ELP was touring ahead of the release of "Trilogy" and Mahavishnu was riding high on the success of "Inner Mounting Flame". Was my first time seeing Cobham play live, and he was mind-blowing on a single-bass Gretsch with a bunch of toms. Soon afterwards I saw them at the Whiskey a Go Go and there he had the double-bass Fibes Crystallite setup.
 

DavedrumsTX

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2014
Messages
88
Reaction score
82
Location
Dallas, Texas
I always thought Paicey grooved MUCH better than Palmer (whose stiffness and lack of feel ruined Asia, IMHO). And speaking of Palmer and Cobham, in March of 1972 I saw ELP at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium — Mahavishnu Orchestra (with Cobham) was the opening act!
I hear ya on Carl. Could you imagine Simon Phillips in Asia?
 


Top