"The New Breed" by Gary Chester.

Roch

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I've got an older copy of the book from when it was first released. I don't have a V-1 section (reading/melodies) but do have a V-A on page 22, and there is no triplet notation.
Here's a pic of that section of the my copy of NB:


View attachment 529691


I scaned the book and didn't see any triplets at all (not that you couldn't transpose to triplet/swing feel).
The notation is 'standard' and accurate, so you should see a triplet arch/bracket with "3" above the group of notes to indicate they should be played as triplets.
OK..I wasn't sure. Maybe I'm making things more difficult than they have to be.. lol-But on page 21 IV-B the first line introduces an new note in the first bar, second beat. Looks like a triplet .I've never seen that with the two broken lines on each side of a 16th. looks like the quarter note is divided into three even notes. Not sure how to play that..I guess you just play the first three beats of the 4?
94185BF4-1860-4ECE-8E55-89EC3BDFF3CB.jpeg

And what is the difference between that and this triplet with solid lines?
59B28E42-7461-4EB9-A36C-8F494D52AB58.jpeg
 
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Hop

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That's one problem that books can suffer from in their transcription; notes are just written as their face value without regards to a spatial grid (that's also a reason I will use graph paper when transposing to set notes also give them a spatial quality, & to help my old eyes).

So to help you out, in the NB book, it looks as though the notes are no more granular than 16th notes; theres no triplets or odd value notes like quintuplets/septuplets etc.; and you'l be basically dealing with standard quarters/eights/sixteenth notes (and some dotted notes which increases what ever note it is associated by half it's value, i.e. a quater note is worth the quarter + an eigth in duration).
So to simplifiy it, consider these rhythms as residing in a sixteenth note grid! The thing that may be tricking your eye is these rhythms are syncopated. And recall if it is a triplet type rhythm and not just three adjacent notes, it will have a bracket or arch above it with a signifying number - in this case we would expect to see a 3 - if we don't see it, it aint a triplet!

The genius (and difficulty) of Gary's system is that he makes you sing the rhythmic note values - like your'e a horn player if you will, rather than a drummer that produces very staccato notes (it's basically all attack) - our single 32nd/16th/8th/& quarter notes played on the snare sound pretty much the same, but a horn player needs to add the proper duration and hold the quarter note longer than that 32nd. This is where syncopation really comes alive!

One way to count is all the places on the 16th grid but emphasiszing the placement of the notes with a louder vocalization (good way to start but is difficult a higher tempos); Progressing, another method is to just vocalize only the played notes and omit the rests. Once you're confident with where the notes are falling on the grid, you'll want to swap the numbers/letters (1e+a) for some type of scat type singing... like bopa do bee deedle dum...

The rhythm in the first pic starts with a sixteenth rest followed by a sixteenth and an eight note; Next figure is a sixteenth, an eight and a sixteenth; next figure is an eightnote followed by two sixteenths and then ends with the same figure that started the measure. So this could be counted as (with bold type indicating played notes and normal text = rest): 1e+ 2e a 3 +a 4e+

The figure in the second pic starts with a sixteenth rest followed by 3 played sixteenth notes... and the measure would be played as counted as 1 e + a 2 3 e + a 4
Just to reiterate, I wrote the 1 and 3 because those rests need to be accounted for and bolded the e + a 2 e + a 4 because that's what gets vocalized/played.

Here's an aid to help visualize these rhythms and the note durations, the 'grid' legend helps explain the note values/context:

Note that the 1/4 is the longest duration in the examples; the 1/8th note represent 1/2 of that 1/4 note duration; and the 1/16th, half again, of the 1/8 note.
The rest is indicated with white fill; and the longer a note the darker the fill (it's subtle but there is a differnce in color between 1/8th and 1/16th note duration blocks).

Note Values.png


Here's an example of the first rhythm with a count and a simple scat vocalization:

Rhythm 1.png



Here's an example of the second rhythm with a count and a simple scat vocalization


Rhythm 2.png


I hope this helps add a bit of clarity and doesn't add to the confusion!!!
 
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Roch

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It helps a lot..I described them as triplets only to identify them for this purpose because I didn't know what they were. I've played trombone for a few years back in my school years so I get the note duration concept you are speaking of. Trying to decipher your explanations will take me a bit of time as it will have to be done slowly and one at a time applying it to the kit as I progress. But, I plan to. It all helps and is good fun....thanks for your time and explanations..
 
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Hop

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Excellent! That trombone background will give you an advantage in Gary's system for 'singing the melody'.
You've got a good approach in tackling a fewer number of measures at a time to help with recognize & mastering the rhythms.

I don't see any complex syncopated rhythms that may provide an exception to these rules of thumb for the book:
Gary's content is all 4/4 based;
His notation is based on having groups of 4 quarter notes/rests or their equivalents, per measure;
Each group of notes is worth one 1/4 note/rest or their equivalents (i.e. one 1/4 note|rest is = two 1/8 notes|rests = four 1/16 notes|rests - in any combination, as long as it adds back up to that 1/4 note).

Sounds like you may just need a music notation refresher to help get your eye/mind to recognize the convention of flags and beams. Also, you may find it useful to dissect the note groups and transpose them to give them a little more spatial weight based on a grid. The dissection really helps get the 'math' down and transposing them on a grid can give your eye a bit of a break when spoting the value of beamed notes.

Here's a couple of resources for notation (may explain it better than my crude methods):
Beams and Flags | Music Notation and Engraving (coloradocollege.edu)
How Music Works
Notation worksheet: L2PD_noteValue.pdf (intromusictheory.com)


YT has some useful resources to leverage as well:

This one is about flag and beam notation:



This one is on recognizing patterns - around the 8:00 minute mark they get to those mixed 8th's & 16th's rhythms:

 

Hop

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Holy Mackerel! Thanks for the info..Hope there isn't a quiz...
LOL... No, I promise there isn't.
I'll let you be a while, so you can digest that stuff and get some rhythm readin' practice in, with this tired old sayin: the more ya practice it, the easier it gets!
 

Roch

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It's incredible how hard it is to sing the quarter notes and play at the same time.. One example is in system one. I don't flam my hands on the hats until I start to sing the quarters then I can't seem the play without flamming...that's gotta be a great work out for your motor skills...
 
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Hop

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My problem is I couldn't/can't sing the note durations in the Gary's system. So those quarter/eight note vocalizations all start sounding like short staccato sixteenth notes, correctly placed, but very short notes.
 

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Ive never spent anytime working out of “The New Breed”. I own a digital copy which was a mistake because I don't think to look on the iPad for my study materials. Ah well...

My real point is that a colleague who, I teach with uses it occasionally so I get to hear students play from the book. What impresses me about the book is that Gary was one of the most recorded pop music drummers. He played a lot of backbeat driven music and although he played cool parts and all, nothing seems to be at the level of complexity of “The New Breed”. There is a lesson there! Take from it what you like but I see this as an example that more is better as long as you know when and where to use it.
 

mebeatee

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It's a drumming book...????
I thought it was a connect the dots compendium......no wonder the resulting pix were boring....
On a more serious note I do have this book among others and every once in a while I'll plomp and sing along to what's on a page....can be great fun and what I do like about these "method" books is they get my noggin' thinking in a different way and also, if I pick the right "exercise" it may help/reinforce or just destroy what I'm stumbling through by myself.
The thing I really like about this book and the method is the "territorial rights" which lends itself to some pretty kewl open handed playing and ergonomic kit setups....then the fun really starts.
bt
 


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