The Ten Drum Sets That Changed Music Forever!

Vistalite Black

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You do know that the music video wasn't the actual recording of the song, right? :laughing5:
I’m going to quote Dcrigger’s rant on this (even though it was misdirected when aimed at me): “Sorry but I think you have it a**-backwards here ... MUSIC is a hearing thing.... not a seeing thing. And (videos of) instruments maybe help sell drum sets, but they certainly don't... change... music.“
 

fishaa

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The population of Ridgeland SC has nearly doubled since 2000.
Oddly, Sweetwater's focus isn't on drums from more than 60 years ago... I'd encourage you to call the number listed at the bottom of the article to register your complaint: (800) 222-4700
I like how defensive you are of complete trash. You really have your finger on the pulse. Keep it up, please.
 

Targalx

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Yamaha Recording Customs – I'd endorse these for life in exchange for Yamaha's V6 4.2-Liter 300 HP outboard boat motor.
Before I owned a set of Yamaha drums (I was a Tama/Ludwig/Remo drums guy back then), I drove a car with a Yamaha V6 motor, a 1991 Ford Taurus SHO. 3.0 liters of 220 horses hooked up to a not-so-great Mazda 5-speed manual. Did not make for a good drum hauler, though. Had to swap it out for a VW Golf to haul the kit.
 

Targalx

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“Grohl’s kit for the (Nevermind) session was rented from Ross Garfield, aka Drum Doctor, in North Hollywood. It was a Tama Artstar II kit, 24"x16", 15"x12" rack tom and 18"x16" floor tom, with a 14"x6" bell brass Black Beauty snare”
Yeah, but the video has him playing like a CB700 or something. There's a reason they destroyed the kit at the end of the video!
 

Houndog

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I think it’s an interesting thread . I think visuals are huge part of music too .
 

dcrigger

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I think I’d agree with you if 60s listeners KNEW Hal Blaine was playing that kit on those records.

Instead, he was unseen and his role was to create the ILLUSION that it was Dennis Wilson, Mickey Dolenz or Karen Carpenter sounding so great on records that featured their pictures — not Blaine’s — on their respective records. In fact, I’m pretty confident Wilson et al actually were listed on the record credits
while Blaine cashed big paychecks in exchange for remaining a well-concealed secret. Thus, he didn’t become inspirational until his story was revealed well after the gold records were handed out.
Sorry VB, but I think you are still missing the point.

Knowing who Hal Blaine was, knowing that he played on those recordings... that is the stuff of fan clubs, magazine articles, hero worshipping and equipment endorsements.....

Which begs the question - once again - we are talking about "changing music", right???

Why would I need to know who Hal Blaine was... or Bonham was... or Rich was to be affected by them so much that my musical course altered???? Isn't simply experiencing their music enough?

Heck the first time I heard Bonham play was on a jukebox at a local donut shop. I had a habit of stopping by after school to have a donut and a coke (I was/am a mad sugar fiend) and putting a quarter in the jukebox to listen to records that I didn't have. I was about 12 and remember being on a real "Fire" by Arthur Brown kick at the time... and one day I landed on "Good Times, Bad Times" as one of my other "3 for a quarter" plays and was immediately like...."OMG That's F-ing Great".

I didn't even remotely know who Bonham was - I had probably read Zepplin's name in magazine, but was otherwise oblivious to them. Of course, I later heard the rest of their catalog in depth - but 99% of how Bonham changed music for me... 99% of him having the most profound effect on me... happened right then... right there. From that lousy sounding jukebox, I experienced the full extent... "Oh my, so THAT is possible!" And then that THAT was now part of my perception of how the drums could be played... how drums could function in that way to that degree!!"

All of that - 100% totally without even knowing John Bonham's name... or the nature of the drum set he was playing... what it looked like. What he looked like... or any of the other peripheral "having nothing to do with the music itself" stuff.

So similarly - Hal Blaine absolutely affected how a generation of players perceived the sound, feel and effect of drums in pop music. We didn't need to know who he was for that to be the case. It just was.

Which brings me back to my original comment - drums don't change music drummers do.... and they do it from WITHIN the music... not from what they say, how they look, or anything not included in the actual music itself.

And finally, I'm not saying that our tools don't matter. Of course they do. And the tools that were a signature part of a music changing endeavor should be noted, acknowledged. Yet it is also possible to get cart too far out in front of the horse.

Batman stops crime... not the Batmobile. And he did it, whether anyone knew it was him or not. :cool:
 

Vistalite Black

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Sorry VB, but I think you are still missing the point.

Knowing who Hal Blaine was, knowing that he played on those recordings... that is the stuff of fan clubs, magazine articles, hero worshipping and equipment endorsements.....

Which begs the question - once again - we are talking about "changing music", right???

Why would I need to know who Hal Blaine was... or Bonham was... or Rich was to be affected by them so much that my musical course altered???? Isn't simply experiencing their music enough?

Heck the first time I heard Bonham play was on a jukebox at a local donut shop. I had a habit of stopping by after school to have a donut and a coke (I was/am a mad sugar fiend) and putting a quarter in the jukebox to listen to records that I didn't have. I was about 12 and remember being on a real "Fire" by Arthur Brown kick at the time... and one day I landed on "Good Times, Bad Times" as one of my other "3 for a quarter" plays and was immediately like...."OMG That's F-ing Great".

I didn't even remotely know who Bonham was - I had probably read Zepplin's name in magazine, but was otherwise oblivious to them. Of course, I later heard the rest of their catalog in depth - but 99% of how Bonham changed music for me... 99% of him having the most profound effect on me... happened right then... right there. From that lousy sounding jukebox, I experienced the full extent... "Oh my, so THAT is possible!" And then that THAT was now part of my perception of how the drums could be played... how drums could function in that way to that degree!!"

All of that - 100% totally without even knowing John Bonham's name... or the nature of the drum set he was playing... what it looked like. What he looked like... or any of the other peripheral "having nothing to do with the music itself" stuff.

So similarly - Hal Blaine absolutely affected how a generation of players perceived the sound, feel and effect of drums in pop music. We didn't need to know who he was for that to be the case. It just was.

Which brings me back to my original comment - drums don't change music drummers do.... and they do it from WITHIN the music... not from what they say, how they look, or anything not included in the actual music itself.

And finally, I'm not saying that our tools don't matter. Of course they do. And the tools that were a signature part of a music changing endeavor should be noted, acknowledged. Yet it is also possible to get cart too far out in front of the horse.

Batman stops crime... not the Batmobile. And he did it, whether anyone knew it was him or not. :cool:
 

Olderschool

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As far as Bonham goes on this "list"....wouldn't the 3 ply GS be "THE" kit instead of his Vistalite? The GS was used on the majority of the playing that supposedly "changed music".....
 

Vistalite Black

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I'm missing the point?

The title of the thread is Ten Drum Sets That Changed Music Forever.

To catch everyone up, you began by asserting that the list (published by Sweetwater.com) is invalid because "drums aren't self-directed." But, you also say Hal Blaine's Blaemire drum set deserves to be on the list (however unsound its premise may be.)

I responded by questioning how Blaine's drum set could change music forever if (during the time the songs it contributed to became hits), the record companies were saying those songs were played on the drum sets of Dennis Wilson, Mickey Dolenz, Karen Carpenter, etc.

Your long-winded response (478 words), which I skimmed, took us down to the malt shop with John Bonham and the Crazy World of Arthur Brown … Sorry, I couldn't keep focused on any of that … But, you seemed to be arguing that drum sets can be influential by their sound alone. Can they, though, when the album credits for some of the songs we're talking about state "Dennis Wilson - Drums." In fact, that album credit was sometimes accompanied by a picture of the only Beach Boy who surfed sitting at a Drum Set that was decidedly not made by Blaemire.

Your closing sentences really took us into another dimension with this non-analogy: "
Batman stops crime... not the Batmobile … whether anyone knew it was him or not."

I don't think that would even make sense in a discussion of superheroes, but the thing here that would be analogous to Drum Sets would be Crime-Fighting Vehicles. Remember, we're discussing a list of world-changing Drum Sets, not drummers.

At the risk of taking us even further down the rhetorical rabbit hole you led us down to extend an argument built on the most fragile of foundations, I now present Autotrader's 12 Best Superhero Vehicles:

Batmobile (Naturally)
Ghost Rider's Hell Cycle
Punisher's Battle Van
Tank Girl's Tank
Captain America's Motorcycle
The X-Men's Blackbird
Wonder Woman's Invisible Plane
Wolverine's Motorcycle
The Green Hornet's Black Beauty
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' Turtle Van
Judge Dredd's Lawmaker
Blade's 1969 Dodge Charger


Unfortunately, Dcrigger, the article doesn't have a comments section for your to muse about how you discovered comics down at the malt shop, how it's not necessary for us to know about these vehicles for them to change the world or whether any of these cars, bikes and planes are "self-directed." (In fact, I believe Wonder Woman's plane does feature auto-pilot).

With that, I think we can return to other Forumites contributing their own thoughts on which Drum Sets should be on a list of world-changing Drum Sets. I'm also happy to discuss the pretty solid list of Superhero Vehicles.
 

Nacci

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I certainly agree with the Yamaha Recording Customs. Am I correct is saying that when Colaiuta, Weckl and Gadd played the Buddy Rich Memorial Concert and had that famous drum tri-et, they were all playing Recording Customs?
 

paulwells73

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My biggest issue with the list is in the segment for Tama Superstars. Yes, Lars and the other metal drummers were very influential, but Billy Cobham, Stewart Copland, and Neil Peart also played Superstars in the 70s and early 80s, and were arguably more influential. Yes, I know Stewart is best known for playing Imperialstars, but he also had a Superstar kit as The Police rose to fame. And Neil is probably most famous for his candy apple red Tama Artstar prototype kit, but that kit is almost like a Superstar in it’s DNA, and Tama later offered candy apple red as a finish for the Superstars. And Neil recorded Rush’s most famous album (Moving Pictures) on his previous Superstar kit.
 

dcrigger

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I'm missing the point?

The title of the thread is Ten Drum Sets That Changed Music Forever.

To catch everyone up, you began by asserting that the list (published by Sweetwater.com) is invalid because "drums aren't self-directed." But, you also say Hal Blaine's Blaemire drum set deserves to be on the list (however unsound its premise may be.)

I responded by questioning how Blaine's drum set could change music forever if (during the time the songs it contributed to became hits), the record companies were saying those songs were played on the drum sets of Dennis Wilson, Mickey Dolenz, Karen Carpenter, etc.
And with that, you gain demonstrate that "you are missing the point".

Dennis Wilson, Mickey Dolenz, Karen Carpenter, etc. didn't change the music - they didn't even play any go that music!!!! What does what teenie-boppers at home knew or didn't know having anything to do with which "drum sets" changed music. Dennis', Mickey's and Karen's didn't. And yet the music was changed. So hmmm... let's think for a second... who should we attribute that fairly significant change to???? Hmm... maybe Hal and his mysterious, behind-the-scenes drum set - that was unknown at the time, but we know all about it now.

Sorry my friend - but you are making no sense. Hal's drum set with Hal driving it changed music as much (if not more) than many of the sets on the list (particularly the ones you added).

Your long-winded response (478 words), which I skimmed, took us down to the malt shop with John Bonham and the Crazy World of Arthur Brown … Sorry, I couldn't keep focused on any of that … But, you seemed to be arguing that drum sets can be influential by their sound alone.
Huh - as you've pointed out - my first premise with all of this that drum sets all by themselves don't account for squat. John Bonham's drum set makes no sound without him playing. And if you or I were to sit behind it and play it - it would not continue to produce that sound.... It's not the hammer, it's the carpenter. Alway, first and foremost.

But maybe if you'd actually read my story, instead of skimming it, you might have discerned that.


Can they, though, when the album credits for some of the songs we're talking about state "Dennis Wilson - Drums." In fact, that album credit was sometimes accompanied by a picture of the only Beach Boy who surfed sitting at a Drum Set that was decidedly not made by Blaemire.
So you're saying that if I didn't have that album...and I never saw that picture of Dennis Wilson... if I only heard the Beach Boys on the radio, I would not have been able to hear the changes that happened in that music.

Again, you've got the cart before the horse.


Your closing sentences really took us into another dimension with this non-analogy: "
Batman stops crime... not the Batmobile … whether anyone knew it was him or not."

I don't think that would even make sense in a discussion of superheroes, but the thing here that would be analogous to Drum Sets would be Crime-Fighting Vehicles. Remember, we're discussing a list of world-changing Drum Sets, not drummers.


At the risk of taking us even further down the rhetorical rabbit hole you led us down to extend an argument built on the most fragile of foundations, I now present Autotrader's 12 Best Superhero Vehicles:

Batmobile (Naturally)
Ghost Rider's Hell Cycle
Punisher's Battle Van
Tank Girl's Tank
Captain America's Motorcycle
The X-Men's Blackbird
Wonder Woman's Invisible Plane
Wolverine's Motorcycle
The Green Hornet's Black Beauty
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' Turtle Van
Judge Dredd's Lawmaker
Blade's 1969 Dodge Charger


Unfortunately, Dcrigger, the article doesn't have a comments section for your to muse about how you discovered comics down at the malt shop, how it's not necessary for us to know about these vehicles for them to change the world or whether any of these cars, bikes and planes are "self-directed." (In fact, I believe Wonder Woman's plane does feature auto-pilot).

With that, I think we can return to other Forumites contributing their own thoughts on which Drum Sets should be on a list of world-changing Drum Sets. I'm also happy to discuss the pretty solid list of Superhero Vehicles.
So I did an 18 word aside - an analogy - a joke - which compelled you to post a 200+ word (including a quoted list and a link!) response. After having busted my chops over a 478 word post.

And all while completely missing the point of that analogy to boot.

Anyway I think that's enough butting heads with you over your myopic view of this topic.

Have a great day and stay safe!
 


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