The Worst Thing About Vintage Drums

What is the worst thing about vintage drums?

  • Often the hardware was flimsy

    Votes: 71 37.6%
  • Hard to find (or afford) matching add-on components

    Votes: 47 24.9%
  • Spotty workmanship at times (during different time periods)

    Votes: 14 7.4%
  • Restoration requires specialized tools/skills/time investment

    Votes: 9 4.8%
  • I don't want to buy something that needs fixing & work

    Votes: 7 3.7%
  • Buying a kit requires knowledge & research to avoid being scammed

    Votes: 14 7.4%
  • Other reasons

    Votes: 27 14.3%

  • Total voters
    189

Coelacanth

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Okay, obviously there's a huge representation of vintage drum lovers on this forum. I appreciate vintage drums as much as the next guy, but let's face it and be honest, they are not without their down-sides.

What is your opinion on what is the biggest down-side to vintage drums? Anybody can choose a poll option. This is NOT a topic of "modern vs. vintage", just a simple poll evaluating our various criticisms of vintage drums.

My choice would have to be the hardware. I've worked with some vintage drum hardware (Ludwig) from the 70's and 80's. The lugs were not manufactured very well, they broke easily. A double-tom stand was an absolute boar to work with. You practically had to adjust it BEFORE mounting the drums. The positioning flexibility was really lacking, and the stability of the drums when mounted was precarious at best. Without rotating the 2 toms to a specific place, a slight push would topple the whole thing over.
 

Drumbum3131

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I think this is a very good topic...but all the things listed above are found in modern drums and hardware also.
 

DanC

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I don't think the first 3 points are necessarily negative, in most cases. Old cars have their failings too, but for collectors that adds to the charm.

The next 3 points are reasons why I like pursuing and acquiring them.

You need another voting selection on that list: "I like them just fine, thanks". ;)



.
 

drums147

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Probably people trying to find negatives when there aren't any :wink:
++++++++++++++1 . . . the only thing I would say is wrong with vintage drums is all the a-holes that rip us off for the parts we need to restore them . . . add that to the list and it will win . . . NAD B)
 

Troyh

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I agree completely with DanC. Hell, I need to spend as much time practicing as I do the restoration process. I love doing it! Mainly because you know this instrument you are restoring can be PLAYED with.
 

Ludwig Von Buzztoven

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Well, as someone who has just refurbished a late '60's RB kit, I can tell you with 100% confidence that the can't-fit-modern-heads-on-an-old-RB kit-mantra is well deserved!

:icon_smile:

It's not that the kit was a giant pain in the a$$ to work on. Well, it kind of was. It was filthy and there were some major parts missing (all of the kick claws were incorrect, the rail consolette and the Pratt muffler was long gone, the interior was painted jet back...). In the end, it was worth it because the kit turned out to be a great, great player and it looks really great. And it really wasn't hard to find parts, even the Pratt. But this will be the last kit I refurb/restore, at least for a very long time. I just don't have the time and patience for it any longer.

But if someone were looking to buy their first vintage kit, and asked my advice about it, I would give them a straight answer. There are pros and cons to owning a vintage drum set, and to deny that would be doing a great disservice to those who are looking to enter the vintage game.

Buzz
 

Coelacanth

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Lovin' the objectivity here. :rolleyes:

But if someone were looking to buy their first vintage kit, and asked my advice about it, I would give them a straight answer. There are pros and cons to owning a vintage drum set, and to deny that would be doing a great disservice to those who are looking to enter the vintage game.
Thanks for being real, Buzz!

I love my 1970 Charger and 1986 Grand National, but there are MAJOR issues with cars from either of those decades, and to act like there were none is similarly doing a disservice. :)
 
C

cpj83

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I wonder if vintage drums will be a hot item once all us baby boomers are gone?

Chris
 

rokkman

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It is fun to restore a piece of history, a lot of the vintage colors are cool. One thing I dont like is all the d bags parting out shells and trying to get outrageous sums of money. I am really starting to hate ebay and I miss having a drum shop that has an old parts bin. Word here is that when Mahoney's closed one of the kids s**t canned all the old parts from the drum shop.
 

tommykat1

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I honestly can find no faults in my vintage Rogers drums. None. QED.
 
L

leedybdp

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I can just imagine the year 2050 equivalent of today's eBay or Craig's list "for sale" ad for a vintage custom made one of a kind Shine drum set.
 

bob

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the only thing i don't like ...is the bass drum spurs .. thats the only thing i changed on my 1965 ludwig bass drum., and i didn't have to drill, other wise i would have left them on.
 

crash

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the only thing i don't like ...is the bass drum spurs .. thats the only thing i changed on my 1965 ludwig bass drum., and i didn't have to drill, other wise i would have left them on.
Aren't those clamps the bomb!? Local shop owner turned me on to them. Legs don't slip, I've added them to my cymbal and tom mount, also. Everything is solid and stays in place, and no extra holes!
Neat kit. I recently picked up a white cortex Ludwig that'll be real similar when I'm done. They've already been molested, so I'm ok with it. Non-original t's and claws on the front, and Yamaha legs added. Bass drum mount was stripped, I had it Helicoiled. Already was thinking RIMS mt, refinish the hoops natural, key rods on the bass. They sound *really* good, and they were cheap.
Wrap's mellowed to an ivory, think it'll be a neat look w/the maple..... Bill D. View attachment 71300
 

Robinsky

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I would say that the worst thing about vintage drums is the way some of them have been treated by their former owners. 2nd worst thing is that I don't own more of them ( the drums - not the owners).
 

DrumBob

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Well, it was a given that you vintage guys would say, "nothing wrong at all," but truth be told, there were/are problems;

Flimsy hardware-All my old Slingerland hardware fell apart within 3 years. It was poorly designed crap.

Out of round shells-60's Ludwigs and Radio Kings.

Poor workmanship-See above.

Finish issues-Remember those Ludwig drums where the wrap was fastened with rivets? Awful.

Parts-Some old parts are hard to find and expensive.

On the other hand, my DWs arrived flawless and have remained rock solid.

Vintage sets are cool in a lot of ways, and you guys are welcomed to use whatever you like, of course, but as everyday working drums, I'll stick with modern stuff.
 

ARGuy

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Thanks, Coel, for posting this poll. I thought about doing the same thing except posting it in the General section where the replies wouldn't be so heavily biased. :rolleyes:
I would have added one more to the list - limited availability of drum sizes. Yeah, I know a lot of guys think the traditional sizes where handed down on stone tablets (and I have no use for 18" deep bass drums and square sized rack toms either), but the choice of sizes in modern drums can be nice.
 


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