The Worst Thing About Vintage Drums

What is the worst thing about vintage drums?

  • Often the hardware was flimsy

    Votes: 71 37.6%
  • Hard to find (or afford) matching add-on components

    Votes: 47 24.9%
  • Spotty workmanship at times (during different time periods)

    Votes: 14 7.4%
  • Restoration requires specialized tools/skills/time investment

    Votes: 9 4.8%
  • I don't want to buy something that needs fixing & work

    Votes: 7 3.7%
  • Buying a kit requires knowledge & research to avoid being scammed

    Votes: 14 7.4%
  • Other reasons

    Votes: 27 14.3%

  • Total voters
    189

troutstudio

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I remember clearly what Bun said on this. He said he loved his vintage kits for recording and modern drums for when the band gets rowdy. That's me in a nut shell too. If there are microphones, I take the vintage. If it's going to be rowdy, I take the big guns.
 

SlingaLud

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The worst thing about vintage drums is they don't make Camcos any longer..Nothing made today even comes close to how great they sound and now the prices are going astronomical even for abused kits with tuxedo lugs...And what about those 1965 3ply Clevelands with a 24" bass drum...They are also impossible to find, and that really sucks as well..Lol...
 

Osahead2

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SlingaLud said:
The worst thing about vintage drums is they don't make Camcos any longer..Nothing made today even comes close to how great they sound and now the prices are going astronomical even for abused kits with tuxedo lugs...And what about those 1965 3ply Clevelands with a 24" bass drum...They are also impossible to find, and that really sucks as well..Lol...
Very well said and I couldn't agree with you more on this. Although the new GHW Drum Company trys to repro the kits from the past IMO, they fall short...
 

Monty

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troutstudio said:
I remember clearly what Bun said on this. He said he loved his vintage kits for recording and modern drums for when the band gets rowdy. That's me in a nut shell too. If there are microphones, I take the vintage. If it's going to be rowdy, I take the big guns.
+1.
 

fishaa

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The most annoying part about my fascination with vintage drums is that it's not REALLY about the sound. We spend all this money on crazy stuff for the mojo and nostalgia... which, don't get me wrong, are very important. But in a blind taste test, exception taken for snare drums. my money says no one can tell the difference between a set of '67 Ludwig, a Rolling Bomber and a Pearl Export. Sorry!!
 

Monty

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fishaa said:
The most annoying part about my fascination with vintage drums is that it's not REALLY about the sound. We spend all this money on crazy stuff for the mojo and nostalgia.
+1
 

kdsdwc

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fishaa said:
The most annoying part about my fascination with vintage drums is that it's not REALLY about the sound. We spend all this money on crazy stuff for the mojo and nostalgia... which, don't get me wrong, are very important. But in a blind taste test, exception taken for snare drums. my money says no one can tell the difference between a set of '67 Ludwig, a Rolling Bomber and a Pearl Export. Sorry!!
I think drummers CAN tell the difference . IMHO .
 

robbie

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I still think my first set of Tama drums opened my eyes to what well-designed, well-built hardware really was - having fussed with various Ludwig kits back in my early days...and please don't get me started on Kent or Premier hardware - yuk!

But since I switched back to my set of 70's Slingerlands I have gigged steady with them for over 10 years and have had zero problems. I have to point out that I regularly clean my kit and oil up the moving parts, so I think that helps a great deal...that and having a really good rug that the BD spurs can dig into.

But I do agree that spotty build quality can be a big issue with some vintage gear
 

Pickinator

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The cost of Rogers Swan cymbal stands and cymbal "L" arms are very expensive and not that great. I don't understand the high cost. I paid $400 for 2 swan cymbal stands and $80 for a Rogers "L" arm.

I also don't like 14" deep bass drums. I prefer 18" or at least 16" depths. Bass drum creep is also a spur issue. I always use a rug with spur holes cut in to prevent it. Rogers shell quality is very good.
 

bigbonzo

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fishaa said:
The most annoying part about my fascination with vintage drums is that it's not REALLY about the sound. We spend all this money on crazy stuff for the mojo and nostalgia... which, don't get me wrong, are very important. But in a blind taste test, exception taken for snare drums. my money says no one can tell the difference between a set of '67 Ludwig, a Rolling Bomber and a Pearl Export. Sorry!!
I totally disagree. Those of us with good ears CAN tell a difference in toms and cymbals. And, you don't even have to have GOOD ears.
 

1966bmx

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bigbonzo said:
The most annoying part about my fascination with vintage drums is that it's not REALLY about the sound. We spend all this money on crazy stuff for the mojo and nostalgia... which, don't get me wrong, are very important. But in a blind taste test, exception taken for snare drums. my money says no one can tell the difference between a set of '67 Ludwig, a Rolling Bomber and a Pearl Export. Sorry!!
I totally disagree. Those of us with good ears CAN tell a difference in toms and cymbals. And, you don't even have to have GOOD ears.
I agree you CAN tell the difference .
 

SlingaLud

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kdsdwc said:
The most annoying part about my fascination with vintage drums is that it's not REALLY about the sound. We spend all this money on crazy stuff for the mojo and nostalgia... which, don't get me wrong, are very important. But in a blind taste test, exception taken for snare drums. my money says no one can tell the difference between a set of '67 Ludwig, a Rolling Bomber and a Pearl Export. Sorry!!
I think drummers CAN tell the difference . IMHO .

I agree, I think most Ludwig drummers can tell the difference between the Ludwig 3ply Maple/Poplar and the WFL Mahogany / Poplar.

I know Camco players can tell the difference between the 4ply and 6ply Jasper and the 6ply Keller L.A. era's in New York second...

Uunderhill said:
Worst thing about vintage is having the modern guys tell me my drums are the best sounding DWs they've ever heard.
or worse, ... modern guys thinking Keller shell drums sound better than 60's Ludwigs

Some Keller shelled drums Do sound better than some 60s Ludwigs...and I am a vintage guy...
 

tommykat1

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Monty said:
So if 60's drums were the pinaccle of drum construction, wouldn't it factor that the drummers who used them back then would still be using them now?
There are plenty of us who still do use them. There are also a lot of full time professional drummers who either tour with them or keep them safe for at home enjoyment. I think that Mr. Carlos might have an opinion on this.
Yes there plenty of you who still use them but the large majority of drummers don't. I'm sure Mr. Carlos has an opinion on this. What does that have to do with my question? If they were so great, then why did the majority of those drummers move on to new drums?
Don't get me wrong; I absolutely love vintage drums. I just don't subscribe to the notion that they are the end-all, be-all greatest thing ever in drums.....Whether or not one famous drummer has an opinion on it or not.




This discussion came up in a thread a few years back. I asked why pro drummers don't tour with their favorite vintage kits like guitarists do with their old guitars, and some of the pros weighed in. I think it was Bun Carlos who said he stopped doing it when a fork lift went through the hard shell case of one of his vintage Ludwigs. Also, he said that shipping drums is not necessary for many pros, as the drum manufacturers of endorsed drummers will supply local music stores with spec'd drum sets, and the shop will supply them to the venue.

Others weighed in that they do indeed tour with their vintage drums. For example, Paul Garisto of the Psychedelic Furs tours with his black Rogers Swivomatic setup.
 

atomicdave

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curotto said:
Drum Collectors
People who put down drum collectors...

Mike Curotto
+1. Most collectors have more than money invested....and like myself, many collected treasures were not purchased at collector prices.....part of the "price" paid was time hunting, patience,enthusiasm, and the investment in cleaning and restoration. :)
 

Nacci

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cpj83 said:
I wonder if vintage drums will be a hot item once all us baby boomers are gone?

Chris
I think this is the most pertinent question that can be asked. My opinion of course but I think that a huge portion of the vintage drums out there are in the hands of Boomers who have worked hard, done well and used that money to collect these treasures. But when this generation goes what is going to happen to this massive collection of vintage drums? I am 44 years, Vintage to me is 80's Phonics and Tama King Beats, anything before that simply does not interest me. So I may be kicking a hornets nest but I would say the "Worst thing about Vintage drums" is that they may be in a bubble.
 

Trev

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cpj83 said:
I wonder if vintage drums will be a hot item once all us baby boomers are gone?

Chris
I'm actually a Generation X, so I'm told, and I love the vintage stuff. I have two nephews (piano players) who are Generation Y and they also love vintage, not so much drums understandably, but they do appreciate the old stuff. So from where I stand vintage ain't dead yet!

And just on the poll, I find the toughest thing about vintage gear is finding genuine parts. Particular here in the Antipodes. When you're trying to locate 1960s Premier HiFi snare lugs you really start to feel every one of those 20,000 miles that we are away from all you guys! Oherwise I have no complaints and will happily stay vintage.
 

Trev

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jptrickster said:
I have zero problems with my vintage Ludwigs. Although I'm not a huge fan of the rail consolette. It works but I prefer using a snare stand because it doesn't require a wrench. Vintage drums are light, the hardware is solid (lugs, hoops, even the bass drum spurs) and the sound is divine. The look is cooler too IMHO. Modern drums are fine; I just prefer the vintage vibe. I voted for the difficulty in finding correct replacement parts/drums. You can't just order stuff immediately; it requires patience and diligence. That adds to the charm in a way.
I like vintage Ludwigs but lets admit it the 60's spurs are lame and you chase the bass drum while you play.
I don't have that problem, on my 22" or my 20", spikes on the 22" and rubber feet on the 20". Do you use a rug? Without it, it would probably slip.



I have a rug but I also hit the bass drum with authority. May be ok if playing jazz.




Wow, dude . . . you must really whack it . . . I have played all genre of music (including hard rock) for years and as long as I had a rug the BD never moved . . . anyway . . . also try a "bass drum anchor" the hoop mounted spur like Ringo used . . . it will not move then . . . NAD




And if all that don't work try the "JP chain that mf'er to your seat method"....if it's going to move your going with it!



Hear hear! I've been reading all these posts about bass drum slippage and have been meaning to say: hey you guys, just tie the bastard down! I keep two suitcase shoulder straps in my cymbal bag for this very reason - one for the BD and one for the hihat. I don't always have the foresight to bring my rug to every gig, sometimes I simply forget. Which is why I strap myself in if need be. Works a treat. :king:
 

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