The Worst Thing About Vintage Drums

What is the worst thing about vintage drums?

  • Often the hardware was flimsy

    Votes: 71 37.6%
  • Hard to find (or afford) matching add-on components

    Votes: 47 24.9%
  • Spotty workmanship at times (during different time periods)

    Votes: 14 7.4%
  • Restoration requires specialized tools/skills/time investment

    Votes: 9 4.8%
  • I don't want to buy something that needs fixing & work

    Votes: 7 3.7%
  • Buying a kit requires knowledge & research to avoid being scammed

    Votes: 14 7.4%
  • Other reasons

    Votes: 27 14.3%

  • Total voters
    189

airborneSFC

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For me I got my collection down to mint kits in near museum quality. At that point I get a little worried about taking them out on gigs and using them for what they were designed to do. Still every kit in my collection has been played out live except my bop kit.

Manny
 

airborneSFC

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Monty said:
The worst thing about vintage drums is the snobbery that comes with them. I like and have owned (and would love to own another one soon) vintage kits. While I admired the sound, finish and smells (yes!) that these kits have, I am also a fan of modern kits.
BUT, there is an awful lot of snobbery that comes with them from time to time, as though the pinnacle of drum making were the 60's.
Very true!! Reminds me of the made in Germany Sonor vs not.
 

kdsdwc

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Hey Monty , " as though the pinnacle of drum making were in the 60's . " It wasn't ? First I heard that it wasn't .

Regards , a Rogers snob !
 

Uunderhill

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cpj83 said:
I wonder if vintage drums will be a hot item once all us baby boomers are gone?

Chris
Darn good question.
There are so many factors.
I've discussed this question with a few people.

When baby boomers started retiring, many of them bought collectables they couldn't afford in their youth.
"When I was a Kid that's the one I always wanted."
Needless to say this included vintage drums.

However, with the 2008 financial crisis, followed by the great recession, many Americans lost 25% of their networth
and nearly all collectables dropped in value.
Some 1960's guitars took a massive hit price wise.

PLus as you've pointed out, there is a demographic shift from Boomers to Gen X'ers.
But IMO 3 ply vintage drums sound miles above plywood shell drums.

Taking these considerations into account,
As the US economy continues to improve, demand for vintage drums will rise slightly,
but once all us boomers are gone, vintage drum prices will drop - but only about 25%.
Where as many other collectables - like first edition books or fine china - will loose much of their value.

The only collectables that have been as stable as vintage drums, that I know of,
are 1950's Danish Teak Furniture (if it has a designer's name on it) and vintage cars.
 

Uunderhill

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BTW: constantly having to retune vintage drums is a bit of a pain but

the absolute worst thing about vintage drums is finding a matching floor tom !!!!!!!!!!!!!

especially in aqua blue glitter.
 

VintageDrummer

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JDA said:
^ ha!
Thread Topics Year 2059.

" 150,000$ For 80s Yammy Recordings? Wha?!"
" Trouble with Restoring vintage '14 Craviatto ply Shell.."
" Why Are Old Ks Still Bringing So Much?"
" Is Jazz Dead?"
" 12pc.Yamaha PHX Ohio Craigslist 325$ Hurry"

oh, one more.
" Rogers Dynasonic. Any Clues?"

lol next lol
wait... people will still be playing instruments in 2059? i had figured a giant iphone would be controlling the world...with all music being electronica or rap and designed to play out of crappy phone speakers
 

SlingaLud

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kdsdwc said:
Hey Monty , " as though the pinnacle of drum making were in the 60's . " It wasn't ? First I heard that it wasn't .

Regards , a Rogers snob !
And I thought the 70s smoked the 60s in a big way...Lol... Of course I never for an instant believed Art Blakey that he was using that tiny child size bass drum as another tom...
 

W&A Player

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SlingaLud said:
Hey Monty , " as though the pinnacle of drum making were in the 60's . " It wasn't ? First I heard that it wasn't .

Regards , a Rogers snob !
And I thought the 70s smoked the 60s in a big way...Lol... Of course I never for an instant believed Art Blakey that he was using that tiny child size bass drum as another tom...
To many of us, the beginning of the decline from the pinnacle of drum making began in 1970. From what I have seen in very recent years, there are drums being made today that approach the overall quality, looks, and sound of our beloved mid 20th century drums.
 

AtlantaDrumGuy

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Worst thing is the same for old K's. Only so many to go around that are still in decent condition. At some point down the line, there will be fewer and fewer nice examples available.
 

JCKOriollo

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W&A Player said:
Hey Monty , " as though the pinnacle of drum making were in the 60's . " It wasn't ? First I heard that it wasn't .

Regards , a Rogers snob !
And I thought the 70s smoked the 60s in a big way...Lol... Of course I never for an instant believed Art Blakey that he was using that tiny child size bass drum as another tom...
To many of us, the beginning of the decline from the pinnacle of drum making began in 1970. From what I have seen in very recent years, there are drums being made today that approach the overall quality, looks, and sound of our beloved mid 20th century drums.

You're speaking in general or just for Rogers? Just curious
 

kdsdwc

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JCKLudwig said:
Hey Monty , " as though the pinnacle of drum making were in the 60's . " It wasn't ? First I heard that it wasn't .

Regards , a Rogers snob !
And I thought the 70s smoked the 60s in a big way...Lol... Of course I never for an instant believed Art Blakey that he was using that tiny child size bass drum as another tom...
To many of us, the beginning of the decline from the pinnacle of drum making began in 1970. From what I have seen in very recent years, there are drums being made today that approach the overall quality, looks, and sound of our beloved mid 20th century drums.

You're speaking in general or just for Rogers? Just curious

Myself , I was just being a smart a$$ !
 

W&A Player

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JCKLudwig said:
Hey Monty , " as though the pinnacle of drum making were in the 60's . " It wasn't ? First I heard that it wasn't .

Regards , a Rogers snob !
And I thought the 70s smoked the 60s in a big way...Lol... Of course I never for an instant believed Art Blakey that he was using that tiny child size bass drum as another tom...
To many of us, the beginning of the decline from the pinnacle of drum making began in 1970. From what I have seen in very recent years, there are drums being made today that approach the overall quality, looks, and sound of our beloved mid 20th century drums.

You're speaking in general or just for Rogers? Just curious



I'm speaking specifically about Rogers, Slingerland, and Leedy. Those are my preferred brands. I have read many similar comments about Ludwig and Gretsch from people here who prefer those brands. If I were interested in new drums, it looks to me as though there are some nice new drum options on the market that might appeal to my mid 20th century drum tastes.
 

Monty

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So if 60's drums were the pinaccle of drum construction, wouldn't it factor that the drummers who used them back then would still be using them now?
 

JCKOriollo

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W&A Player said:
Hey Monty , " as though the pinnacle of drum making were in the 60's . " It wasn't ? First I heard that it wasn't .

Regards , a Rogers snob !
And I thought the 70s smoked the 60s in a big way...Lol... Of course I never for an instant believed Art Blakey that he was using that tiny child size bass drum as another tom...
To many of us, the beginning of the decline from the pinnacle of drum making began in 1970. From what I have seen in very recent years, there are drums being made today that approach the overall quality, looks, and sound of our beloved mid 20th century drums.You're speaking in general or just for Rogers? Just curious
I'm speaking specifically about Rogers, Slingerland, and Leedy. Those are my preferred brands. I have read many similar comments about Ludwig and Gretsch from people here who prefer those brands. If I were interested in new drums, it looks to me as though there are some nice new drum options on the market that might appeal to my mid 20th century drum tastes.
As more of a ludwig guy Id say 69-74 is probably the sweet spot for ludwig but I like the old mahogany 3plys too.

I def see what you mean on those other brands
 

W&A Player

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Monty said:
So if 60's drums were the pinaccle of drum construction, wouldn't it factor that the drummers who used them back then would still be using them now?
There are plenty of us who still do use them. There are also a lot of full time professional drummers who either tour with them or keep them safe for at home enjoyment. I think that Mr. Carlos might have an opinion on this.
 

AtlantaDrumGuy

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There's no right or wrong here. Old kits can be great. New kits can be great. With respect to the question of why don't the old pros still use the old drums. It's a valid point. They might, in the studio. But not as many are carrying around that 1957 Gretsch on tours, except for the Stones (I said not many, because some drummers still do that). And true, many of the legends of past did indeed move on from their drums of the 50s and 60s, etc. case in point, bunch of jazz greats moving from Gretsch to Yamaha or Pearl, and so on. It happened. Then you had Paul Motian who still preferred his older sets from what I have gathered...Buddy Rich returned to his old beautiful Radio Kings in the last days (1987 to be exact)...Anyways...

I see it like this. There are two main reasons for the vintage thing. Nostalgia or sound. Take your pick. I like both of these aspects, but I have modern drums too.
 

Monty

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W&A Player said:
So if 60's drums were the pinaccle of drum construction, wouldn't it factor that the drummers who used them back then would still be using them now?
There are plenty of us who still do use them. There are also a lot of full time professional drummers who either tour with them or keep them safe for at home enjoyment. I think that Mr. Carlos might have an opinion on this.
Yes there plenty of you who still use them but the large majority of drummers don't. I'm sure Mr. Carlos has an opinion on this. What does that have to do with my question? If they were so great, then why did the majority of those drummers move on to new drums?
Don't get me wrong; I absolutely love vintage drums. I just don't subscribe to the notion that they are the end-all, be-all greatest thing ever in drums.....Whether or not one famous drummer has an opinion on it or not.
 

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