Thermogloss opinions wanted (warning gruesome pics enclosed).

wflkurt

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Hey guys, I went and looked at some drums today as the person had a few sets that I was interested in. Some of it was decent but what just absolutely broke my heart was this 1971 Ludwig pro beat in thermogloss maple. 14x24,9x13,10x14,16x16 and 16x18. looks like a late 1971 set possibly 1972 as the paper labels have the random number date code instead of an actual date. The drums have sadly been water damaged quite a bit and are in really rough shape. Obviously I know they are worth something in terms of parts and such and the 13 and 14 toms seems to have for the most part escaped the water damage. The bass drum has some on the bottom, the 16 has some and the 18 got it the worst. Honestly seeing this set was so disturbing to me that I actually had trouble sleeping over it. Other than a parts set and selling of the toms, is this set salvageable at all? What would you guys pay for it? On the plus side I felt around each drum and it didn't feel like my hand wanted to push through anything. Look at the pics at your own risk... It felt like I was a CSI investigator in a morgue looking at a badly abused victim.

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CC Cirillo

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I don’t know the value, but—should you find the right price and have the time, Brother Kurt—perhaps this is not a chance meeting and the soul of these drums are calling out to you for their salvation.
 

JDA

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Next to the double bass, the jazzette, that was the outfit & finish to have in 71-72.
peak Ludwig (if you could afford it ) at the time..
 
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wflkurt

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I don’t know the value, but—should you find the right price and have the time, Brother Kurt—perhaps this is not a chance meeting and the soul of these drums are calling out to you for their salvation.

I'm thinking the soul of these drums have been pretty much crushed. Maybe there is a drum cemetery much like the pet cemetery.

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wflkurt

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This same guy also has an 80's Rogers xp-8 set in NE white that is in pretty good shape. It is a 22,12,13,16 with a chrome dynasonic. Are those worth much? I would be trying to flip those so what would you guys pay for a set like that?
 

JazzDrumGuy

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I can't tell. I need more pics but would jump on them (for very cheap, I hope!) and would be thrilled to take on that project. You could probably make the outside look right and finish into a thermo-looking color to salvage them. As for the insides......hmmm, that's going to take a bit of work. I think you do your best and it could work. Looks like glue and/or filler, sanding and refinishing for sure. Chrome is easy (Dawn bath, etc). Surely it won't be worth a good vintage set, but I think it could for sure be a playable kit. It may not be a super pretty or museum piece when you are done if going DIY, but you should be able to get it decent+ and only you'll know the issues. I'd buy them for "parts" only and assume the damaged shells are worth zero......but if you can salvage them, then great.

Years ago, I scored a free set of Slingys years ago off CList. The guy was moving out at 5PM and needed them gone or was tossing them. I happened to be nearby visiting my inlaws. I got there and they were sitting in the corner of a damp dark garage. I didn't even want to put them in my car (in trash bags!) no less. But I got them and brought them home. 13/14/18/24. It was the first kit I decided to strip & restore. I ended up (poorly) stripping the faded white wrap and refinishing the outer mahogany in gunstock. I clear coated the insides after cleaning & sanding them as best I could (mostly mildew spots). The edges were okay but I did some repairs. The chrome shined up well.

When it was done, I had a "relic" set - they were newly "finished" but had scratches, marks, dings, etc., but all was sealed under clear coat (satin inside & out). They looked good and played nicely. I did end up selling the 13, still have the thunderous 24, converted the 18 to a bop bass (I added an 8x12 & 14x14, rewrapped all and sold as a kit), and also made the 14" a micro bass.
 

wflkurt

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I can't tell. I need more pics but would jump on them (for very cheap, I hope!) and would be thrilled to take on that project. You could probably make the outside look right and finish into a thermo-looking color to salvage them. As for the insides......hmmm, that's going to take a bit of work. I think you do your best and it could work. Looks like glue and/or filler, sanding and refinishing for sure. Chrome is easy (Dawn bath, etc). Surely it won't be worth a good vintage set, but I think it could for sure be a playable kit. It may not be a super pretty or museum piece when you are done if going DIY, but you should be able to get it decent+ and only you'll know the issues. I'd buy them for "parts" only and assume the damaged shells are worth zero......but if you can salvage them, then great.

Years ago, I scored a free set of Slingys years ago off CList. The guy was moving out at 5PM and needed them gone or was tossing them. I happened to be nearby visiting my inlaws. I got there and they were sitting in the corner of a damp dark garage. I didn't even want to put them in my car (in trash bags!) no less. But I got them and brought them home. 13/14/18/24. It was the first kit I decided to strip & restore. I ended up (poorly) stripping the faded white wrap and refinishing the outer mahogany in gunstock. I clear coated the insides after cleaning & sanding them as best I could (mostly mildew spots). The edges were okay but I did some repairs. The chrome shined up well.

When it was done, I had a "relic" set - they were newly "finished" but had scratches, marks, dings, etc., but all was sealed under clear coat (satin inside & out). They looked good and played nicely. I did end up selling the 13, still have the thunderous 24, converted the 18 to a bop bass (I added an 8x12 & 14x14, rewrapped all and sold as a kit), and also made the 14" a micro bass.

Cool story. I do know that at least the parts and bass drum hoops are worth something. The 13 and 14 are probably ok but not mint by any means. As I mentioned earlier, it was a good feeling to know that as I went around each drum, I was happy to see that my hand didn't feel like it wanted to push through anything. That's a plus I suppose. I'm not sure where this guy will be at selling-wise. I think when he was describing these maple Ludwigs to me, he thought they were in better shape. As we looked at them I pretty much told him how bad they really were. I guess he had not looked at them all that closely in some time. It's really a shame though.
 

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Trunk Paint the interiors; rewrap...sell em as Barn find.



KIDDING
 

Houndog

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Rogers made a ton of those NE White kits ..
I’d imagine you’d do well to flip them for $500-600 ….
 

JDA

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If the memriloc hardware is absolutely perfect may be worth it ; if they're your sizes..
 

franke

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I'd offer what GC would offer - $100-$200.

Are you planning on doing the work yourself? Regardless, besides sanding, filling, re-lacquering the exteriors, and finding an effective means to address the mildew issues, the shells may be structurally unsound. For example, the ply separation in the second photo of a floor tom suggests that the shell is not only out-of-round but out-of-square.

Thermogloss kits are rare, and it's a damn shame that the owner either didn't have the means or the will to properly store these. This reminds me of what one often sees on "treasure hunt" reality TV shows, where the host will come upon a vast collection of vintage cars and/or motorcycles strewn about a multi-acre farm, stored in leaky barns,, sheds, or simply rusting right out in the open -owned by some cranky coot who maintains he intends to restore all of them but looks like he probably won't live another year.
 

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DrumR69

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I am kind of a sucker for bad shape drums.
I say if they are cheap enough give it a whirl. Sand them down see how they look, you might be surprised.
Worst case is you will have lots of spare hardware. If it was me I would be game.

Wayne
 

rikkrebs

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Those can absolutely be saved. It is, however, going to take time, energy and money. Personally I wouldn't pay more than $150-200 for them because there are LOTS of other classic/vintage kits available. It's fun to bring them back to life.
 

Tommy D

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Sometimes, you just need to let things go. I wouldn't put the time or money in to fixing these. There are so many better condition kits selling for $500-600 that are worth the time fixing. I would offer maybe $50 for them. I honestly don't know if I would even want to put those in my car to take home.
 

crash

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Hey guys, I went and looked at some drums today as the person had a few sets that I was interested in. Some of it was decent but what just absolutely broke my heart was this 1971 Ludwig pro beat in thermogloss maple. 14x24,9x13,10x14,16x16 and 16x18. looks like a late 1971 set possibly 1972 On the plus side I felt around each drum and it didn't feel like my hand wanted to push through anything. Look at the pics at your own risk... It felt like I was a CSI investigator in a morgue looking at a badly abused victim.

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I'd tackle them, if heads still fit. I'd glue down what flapping wood I could. Putty any gaps needed. Scuff sand the outside and go with MinWax wipeon poly. A luthier advised me to do this Slingerland set that way. Finish badly abused. Didn't have water damage, tho. Later fixed the Gretsch snare with the same method. Yes, relic'ed. But, still good to play.
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studrum

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Those can absolutely be saved. It is, however, going to take time, energy and money. Personally I wouldn't pay more than $150-200 for them because there are LOTS of other classic/vintage kits available. It's fun to bring them back to life.
The smart Forum member will invest in sandpaper, because Kurt is about make major purchases of it. I agree with Rick. If there's not too much mold on the inside AND the drums are in reasonable round, you could save 'em. I'd get ready to find the least pain-inducing method to sand the insides. Maybe consult with a professional woodworker/furniture repair person.

Or do like I'm doing, and send them to Jack Lawton. That's what I'm doing with this '64/'65 SlingerLeedy bass drum. It had been set up in a full set in my bandmates' basement for 3 or 4 years for rehearsals. When I saved the set from a garage in '97 I could see that about a six inch wide trail of water had settled along the bottom inside. No front head for decades and spray painted black. Drum was in perfect round. In about 2005 I had Lawton restore the shells and my brother prep (which is key) the shells and paint them in Black Gold duco.

Fast forward to this past January. My bandmate has a beautiful house with a nicely prepared basement, but water is water... there was a flood. My BD is a 22. 24" of water flooded the basement. At least it was fresh water! But he had electrical fears, despite no power, and then the insurance company said not to move anything before they could get pics. The drums sat in water for days.

I think the floor tom floated, because NO WATER got inside the shell! That was a relatively easy but tedious clean. The bass drum, not so good. I've taken all the metal hardware off of it and have cleaned it. Waxing of small metal parts is underway. My brother's bullet-proof paint job has held. The shell was only soft around the bearing edges, and the re-rings appear to have moved/loosened. "Heads spin freely," as we say, because the shell is in round. It has finally dried out and no sections are soft. After consulting with Lawton, I'll ship it out to him in a day or so for mold remediation and edge and re-rings attention.

What you're about to see may disturb some Forum members. I recommend having a grief counselor or spiritual advisor present before viewing the following pictures. See all the pretty colors!

Then there are triumphs. Behold the floor tom revival:
 

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wflkurt

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The smart Forum member will invest in sandpaper, because Kurt is about make major purchases of it. I agree with Rick. If there's not too much mold on the inside AND the drums are in reasonable round, you could save 'em. I'd get ready to find the least pain-inducing method to sand the insides. Maybe consult with a professional woodworker/furniture repair person.

Or do like I'm doing, and send them to Jack Lawton. That's what I'm doing with this '64/'65 SlingerLeedy bass drum. It had been set up in a full set in my bandmates' basement for 3 or 4 years for rehearsals. When I saved the set from a garage in '97 I could see that about a six inch wide trail of water had settled along the bottom inside. No front head for decades and spray painted black. Drum was in perfect round. In about 2005 I had Lawton restore the shells and my brother prep (which is key) the shells and paint them in Black Gold duco.

Fast forward to this past January. My bandmate has a beautiful house with a nicely prepared basement, but water is water... there was a flood. My BD is a 22. 24" of water flooded the basement. At least it was fresh water! But he had electrical fears, despite no power, and then the insurance company said not to move anything before they could get pics. The drums sat in water for days.

I think the floor tom floated, because NO WATER got inside the shell! That was a relatively easy but tedious clean. The bass drum, not so good. I've taken all the metal hardware off of it and have cleaned it. Waxing of small metal parts is underway. My brother's bullet-proof paint job has held. The shell was only soft around the bearing edges, and the re-rings appear to have moved/loosened. "Heads spin freely," as we say, because the shell is in round. It has finally dried out and no sections are soft. After consulting with Lawton, I'll ship it out to him in a day or so for mold remediation and edge and re-rings attention.

What you're about to see may disturb some Forum members. I recommend having a grief counselor or spiritual advisor present before viewing the following pictures. See all the pretty colors!

Then there are triumphs. Behold the floor tom revival:
Yikes that is pretty bad. I'm not sure where I am at with this yet. I have been fortunate to have a good number of gigs lately and it has been keeping me quite busy. I'm going to reach out again as he has other things of interest too (nothing water damaged like this) and go from there.

Thanks for all the replies.
 


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