Thin Crash/Ride or Ride?

FitDrummer

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Hi all!

I use quite a bit for my gigs a 60’s 20” Zildjian Crash/Ride (2047 grams.) My band plays multiple genres and I’m mic’d 95% of the time. I find thin weighted crash/rides versatile and musical. Obviously, depending on the music, venue, acoustics, etc, does anyone else prefer crash/rides over regular rides?
 

goodcat1337

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I'd rather use light, crashable rides. Most crash/rides I've played still usually have the gongy kind of sound to me. Dream Bliss being the exception.

I had an Agop Traditional Dark Ride a while back. 24" and it was only like 2600g. Super washy and crashed great. Bell was pretty weak though. I've got a Jazz Light Ride from a Canadian company called Heartbeat right now. They're basically Istanbul Mehmet but with the Heartbeat stamp on them. This one is also a 24", but it's right around the 2800g mark. Still super crashable, but the bell cuts a little bit better.
 

notINtheband

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In my experience, things that are designed to do multiple things, don’t usually do all those things exceptionally well. But if I ever play a crash/ride that does I will buy it! Keeping an open mind and ear.
 

daveplaydrum

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Kinda backwards but I use a 22 Zildjian k light ride as a crash/ride. Not nearly enough definition to be a main rock ride but since it crashes so beautifully and the ride is appropriate during softer parts of songs it makes for the perfect crash/ride. My 18” 60s Zildjian crash/ride is basically a heavy crash though, unless you play it with a very light touch it is pretty worthless as a ride.
 

notINtheband

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In my experience, things that are designed to do multiple things, don’t usually do all those things exceptionally well. But if I ever play a crash/ride that does I will buy it! Keeping an open mind and ear.
I do want to qualify that, I have a drum student who was gifted a set and wants to add a cymbal. He currently only has 1, a crash. So in his situation a crash/ride would be an excellent addition.
 

moosryan

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I do this too--I've been using the classic A Sweet Ride for a while for this purpose, but lately I'm finding I might want something even thinner, with a better crasher and milder bell. Going A vintage seems like a good move!
 

jptrickster

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Yes for sure I want a versatile ride that gives a big balsy crash and a mallet roll with a full brilliant crescendo. And a strong stick and bell. My go to 50’s large stamp 20 right in the ball park @ 2000g
 

FitDrummer

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I do this too--I've been using the classic A Sweet Ride for a while for this purpose, but lately I'm finding I might want something even thinner, with a better crasher and milder bell. Going A vintage seems like a good move!
I just love the sound, feel of how an A vintage blends. That’s all I play with.
 

moosryan

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I just love the sound, feel of how an A vintage blends. That’s all I play with.
I'm with you! I've got vintage A hats and a crash in this setup. Truly nothing more versatile. (And don't get me started on trans stamps, which are the most undervalued cymbals out there.)
 

lossforgain

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You'll notice that those vintage As often didn't say what model they were *supposed* to be -- I think a cymbal IS what you use it AS. And that can be multiple things. I have sold most of my dedicated crashes because I can crash on my lighter, larger cymbals. Some of those are marked ride, some are not. The best one I've played marked "crash ride" is a K Rarities 19" Dark Thin, very hard to find but it's a truly exceptional cymbal.
 

FitDrummer

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I'm with you! I've got vintage A hats and a crash in this setup. Truly nothing more versatile. (And don't get me started on trans stamps, which are the most undervalued cymbals out there.)
Yes! 100% agree!
 

IBitePrettyHard

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To be pedantic, there are "crash rides" and then there are "crashable rides". They are totally different from each other.

A crash/ride is usually heavier and used for louder music like Rock. Not always, but it's more likely. In contrast, you'll never hear a jazz player talking about their crash/ride, lol.

A crashable ride is a ride cymbal.....that is also crashable. They tend to be lighter in weight, and more often are used in the quieter half of genres like jazz, funk, blues, country, and even pop.

But anyway, I love crashable rides. It's nice having another crash cymbal on the kit without adding cymbals! My current favorites are my Zildjian Kerope 22" and K Sweet 21".
 

AtlantaDrumGuy

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I like “both” types of rides.

Suprisngly enough, I even crash my heavier rides. It just depends what I’m doing, which is why keep a few (ahem…) rides on hand to select from. There are times on certain gigs where I need a little more of a defined ping to keep the time. Other times, I can get away with a lighter ride. One of the gigs I was playing could get a bit loud, and my K con was too quiet, but a K Light 24” was better in that situation. And my K heavy worked so well. I know, because I would intentionally bring different rides each time to the same gig.
 

FitDrummer

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I like “both” types of rides.

Suprisngly enough, I even crash my heavier rides. It just depends what I’m doing, which is why keep a few (ahem…) rides on hand to select from. There are times on certain gigs where I need a little more of a defined ping to keep the time. Other times, I can get away with a lighter ride. One of the gigs I was playing could get a bit loud, and my K con was too quiet, but a K Light 24” was better in that situation. And my K heavy worked so well. I know, because I would intentionally bring different rides each time to the same gig.
Great point! I recently did this with my last gig this past weekend.
 

FitDrummer

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To be pedantic, there are "crash rides" and then there are "crashable rides". They are totally different from each other.

A crash/ride is usually heavier and used for louder music like Rock. Not always, but it's more likely. In contrast, you'll never hear a jazz player talking about their crash/ride, lol.

A crashable ride is a ride cymbal.....that is also crashable. They tend to be lighter in weight, and more often are used in the quieter half of genres like jazz, funk, blues, country, and even pop.

But anyway, I love crashable rides. It's nice having another crash cymbal on the kit without adding cymbals! My current favorites are my Zildjian Kerope 22" and K Sweet 21".
Yes, plus I play with a minimalist setup: 60’s Hats, (1 or 2) 70’s Thin Crashes, 90’s Medium Ride, or (my infamous 60’s Thin Crash/Ride.) You are correct about not adding more cymbals! Also, I’ll rotate out both of my 20’s depending on the situation.
 

FitDrummer

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I like “both” types of rides.

Suprisngly enough, I even crash my heavier rides. It just depends what I’m doing, which is why keep a few (ahem…) rides on hand to select from. There are times on certain gigs where I need a little more of a defined ping to keep the time. Other times, I can get away with a lighter ride. One of the gigs I was playing could get a bit loud, and my K con was too quiet, but a K Light 24” was better in that situation. And my K heavy worked so well. I know, because I would intentionally bring different rides each time to the same gig.
Totally can relate with my 20” 90’s ride for heavier stuff, as I do crash that one as well.
 

nickrobotron

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I have a 60’s crash/ride as well. And
I have a 60’s medium thin ride. Both have their ink. They’re only 100g apart in weight. The shape of the cymbals are different.

The crash/ride is much more of an arch with more weight in the bell. It is a touch darker and swells when you stick it. It truly is hard to use as a straight ride. But, surprise surprise, it rules when you crash ride it. Haha.

The medium thin ride is flatter and has more even weight distribution. It crashes a little more quietly and holds the stick much better. I play them together, but I definitely put the Ride in the Ride spot.

I’d be curious to see a pic of your crash ride. Does it still have ink on it? Both of mine have visible ink.
 

FitDrummer

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I have a 60’s crash/ride as well. And
I have a 60’s medium thin ride. Both have their ink. They’re only 100g apart in weight. The shape of the cymbals are different.

The crash/ride is much more of an arch with more weight in the bell. It is a touch darker and swells when you stick it. It truly is hard to use as a straight ride. But, surprise surprise, it rules when you crash ride it. Haha.

The medium thin ride is flatter and has more even weight distribution. It crashes a little more quietly and holds the stick much better. I play them together, but I definitely put the Ride in the Ride spot.

I’d be curious to see a pic of your crash ride. Does it still have ink on it? Both of mine have visible ink.
You got it! These are my only 2 that I have and use. The first pic is my ‘96 Medium for heavier stuff, or if certain set lists call for those genres. The second pic is the 60’s Crash/Ride, or just a light ride with no visible ink.
 

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