header.nohb.html

Thinking about buying a wood snare drum

ludwigjim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
169
Reaction score
69
Location
NJ
Since you already have a brass snare, which tends to be on the brighter side soundwise, I would suggest starting off with a maple snare that is a bit more "warm" and mellow. You can't go wrong with a Ludwig Classic Maple snare, but there are other fine options available from other companies. Being a "newish" drummer, I wouldn't venture out into other more exotic woods until you're comfortable with what you have and have developed your skills and ears to be more discernible about the vast number of other options available.
Go with what cochlea said. Ludwig 5x14 Classic Maple snare. Work horse and solidly built. Newer models are wonderful/
 

JustSumGuy

Member
Joined
Oct 31, 2012
Messages
9
Reaction score
9
I am a newish drummer and having so much fun with it. I recently upgraded my kit to a used Gretsch Renown 2 in 13/16/24. For snares I have a Worldmax 6.5x14 black nickel over brass with die cast hoops, and a Blacrolite 5x14.
I have been thinking I should add a wood snare and have no idea what direction to go. I almost bought a renown snare to match the kit but I see cool custom snares ect that cost the same (used) or just a hundred or so more.
Suggestions on what direction and wood species to look at?
The question to ask yourself is what is it you're not getting from the two snares you have. You want to go looking for a sound that is actually beaconing you. Not what it's made of......Just having a wood snare drum because you don't have one yet, isn't necessarily the best reason and I'm not saying that you're thinking this way. But since you're "newish" to playing, know that part of the joy of learning drums is in developing your preferences of tone which encompasses not only the way you hit the drums, but the heads, hoops and tunings for starters. And after you cross the bridge into wood snares, you have size, plus, construction (segmented/steam bent/ply) and then the particular wood. All of which sound different. Maple is the most commonly used one. Wrapped shells sound different than oiled which sound different than lacquered etc......

Great players have ears that tell them when and what is needed for a particular song or recording. After that, you start on the infinite number of combinations of tuning, heads etc.....Try taking your two drums into your local drum shop. Try out a few snares and see which ones sound best to you. Then put your own snares up on the stand and make sure you're not picking a new drum because it sounds like one you already have and like. The point is to end up with different sounds that you still like even though they sound different enough that you would not necessarily use them for the same situations....I hope that helps.....
I am a newish drummer and having so much fun with it. I recently upgraded my kit to a used Gretsch Renown 2 in 13/16/24. For snares I have a Worldmax 6.5x14 black nickel over brass with die cast hoops, and a Blacrolite 5x14.
I have been thinking I should add a wood snare and have no idea what direction to go. I almost bought a renown snare to match the kit but I see cool custom snares ect that cost the same (used) or just a hundred or so more.
Suggestions on what direction and wood species to look at?
 

Drumbumcrumb

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2019
Messages
662
Reaction score
923
Location
Rhode Island
I think you’d be really happy with a ssb or stave drum with your budget (or even under budget). Summit makes a beautiful drum, and it’s probably something you’ll hold onto for a good long while. And if not, you’ll have no problem finding it a new home. Something cool about a solid drum. It’s high class. Maple or a similar wood is the ‘standard’, but for woods I’d go for a walnut or Bubinga. Maple is so… maple. Walnut is like the copper of wood snares, it has a darkness to it that sounds great. Bubinga has a lovely, musical quality. Both can be gorgeous woods visually.

I think a deep wood snare, 13x7 or 14x7 or even 8, have an extra shot of special sauce. You can really get a deeeep, full sound that says “IM A WOOD SNARE, BABY” Mellow, warm, organic butteriness. Of course deep sounds good low, but I think they shine at mid-high to high where they never get ‘thin’ - just a fat pop that’s deeply satisfying.
 

BennyK

DFO Star
Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
18,150
Reaction score
6,203
I bought a brand new 5x14 Ludwig Classic Maple back n the nineties and used it exclusively for three years - studio and bar work . It was a consistently excellent snare at all tunings and never let me down .
 

Michael C

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2022
Messages
70
Reaction score
136
Location
California
Thank you to all that have contributed to this thread. I have learned a lot by asking what I thought was a simple question and although overwhelming I know more today than I did a few days ago. I have taken the time to consider if I even need another snare and honestly I do not… that does not mean I don’t want one.

Drumming for me is a hobby. Just like my competitive shooting, it brings me joy, entertainment, and learning a new skill. I’d rather be in my garage loading ammunition, working on one of my rifles, and goofing around than inside the house watching TV. I have been away from home for two weeks at a large championship 1000 yard rifle match (with a couple days off in between the two weeks) and I already miss playing my drums. Before I left I needed to load about 500 rounds of ammunition and clean two rifles. I would take a break from loading or cleaning and walk over the corner to my drum kit and play for half an hour or so and go back to what I was doing. My wife just laughs at me, and says, “great now you spend all day in there!”

I have looked at lots of drums from 200 to 600 dollars of different wood types. However, in the end, I took some advice and found a used Gretsch maple 6.5x14 with die cast hoops for 300 dollars. Considering what a set of die cast cost new today I dont feel bad about the price of this drum.
 


Top