Thinking of switching to 20 inch rides

dbeck928

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I know the trend has been to play 22" rides for the last 20 years, but lately I've been thinking of selling all my 22" rides and going back to 20" rides.
Am I insane? Does anyone else generally prefer 20" to 22"?

I'm thinking that the positioning can be easier, and the overall sound slightly mellower/blending.
I have been playing 20” rides for 50 years but have been really wanting to own a couple of 22”. If you have any for sale I’m pretty interested. I have purchased about 20 cymbals in the last 3 months and sold 8 ... so I’m in a cymbalmania period of life.

let me know .

Dave Beck
 

hsosdrum

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I used 20s and 21s starting in 1969 when I was a teenager — various models (Mediums, Rocks, a Canadian K and a K Heavy) but always Zildjian. Then in 1988 I bought my first 22" ride (a K Heavy) and fell in love with the wider spread, deeper pitch and greater sense of weight that a 22 provides. I gave the 20" K Heavy that I had been using up until then to my sister.

I used that 22" K Heavy from 1988 until 2015, when I purchased a 22" K Ride. Then last week I added a 22" A Avedis Dark Ride, and I'm sure both the K Ride and the A Avedis will cover any playing situation in which I could ever imagine finding myself. So my 22" K Heavy is retired, as is a 21" Sweet Ride with which I flirted but never really bonded.

I am a confirmed 22" ride lover: For me they have more spread, greater sense of weight, lower pitch and more musical personality than their 20" cousins.
 

Swissward Flamtacles

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I'm thinking that the positioning can be easier, and the overall sound slightly mellower/blending.
Before you sell all your 22" rides*: I think that the positioning is not that different. It's just a difference of 1" really (radius) and you might be able to get the same comfortability by changing the height and angle of the cymbal. I've moved away from setting up the cymbals rather flat and low. You can still get the same low position of the hand and a stroke perpendicular to the ride surface. This set up by Billy Hart might be a bit extreme - just for visualization purposes. :)
billyhart78.jpg

Have you experimented with a bit of duct tape on the underside? That can make the sound of cymbal less harsh and controllable, too.

* Just read the rest of the thread - should have done that before, maybe... :D
 

dsop

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I think that the positioning is not that different. It's just a difference of 1" really (radius)
Well, no, it's 2". I was referring to space all around the cymbal. As for the angle, I do already angle my ride quite a bit. I'm digging the 20s now. And the 22s weren't harsh or uncontrollable. This was all about size/real-estate and sheepish behavior.
 

Elvis

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I have been playing 20” rides for 50 years but have been really wanting to own a couple of 22”. If you have any for sale I’m pretty interested. I have purchased about 20 cymbals in the last 3 months and sold 8 ... so I’m in a cymbalmania period of life.

let me know .

Dave Beck
PLEASE CHECK YOUR PM
 

Elvis

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Before you sell all your 22" rides*: I think that the positioning is not that different. It's just a difference of 1" really (radius) and you might be able to get the same comfortability by changing the height and angle of the cymbal. I've moved away from setting up the cymbals rather flat and low. You can still get the same low position of the hand and a stroke perpendicular to the ride surface. This set up by Billy Hart might be a bit extreme - just for visualization purposes. :)
View attachment 454193
Have you experimented with a bit of duct tape on the underside? That can make the sound of cymbal less harsh and controllable, too.

* Just read the rest of the thread - should have done that before, maybe... :D
I found black electrical tape works, too and comes off easier. Also doesn't leave any residue.
I found something similar in ride cymbal placement, too.
To this day, I still mount my ride a little high and angled. I find it a more comfortable position than flat and low, with exception of setting it in place of a floor tom.

Elvis
 

Seb77

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Today I set up my drums with all 14" hi-hat cymbals - as hats, but also as ride and crash (I didn't bring my cymbals to the practice space, but had left several pairs of hi-hat cymbals there). Used a 14" A bottom as ride - it worked, but it also reminded me what size does to stabilize a cymbal; the same gradual difference exists between 20" and larger cymbals. With that 14" ride, I felt like I out-hipped Steve Gadd with his 18"!
 

RIDDIM

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In my saner moments, I buy things because I like the sounds they make, or because they facilitate making such sounds. I have 22, 20, 21 and 18" rides this applies to.

Use what enhances your music.
 

JDA

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"I've heard of going up to 22" Rides rarely back down to 20" only and If...and this is a modern problem.. "you got into 22" rides "too early"

---benjamin franklin 1812 save a penny earn a penny
"milk no cow before it's time"
--Henry Ford 1916
make sure she's dry before moving up a level.
 

jaymandude

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I mentioned this recently to another forum member.

Often it;s where you hear/perceive the pitch of where you want your ride to be. I've noticed for myself I like the pitch to be slightly higher. But to get that with a 22 you have to make it heavier, which increases the weight. Which affects the feel and crashability. The 22's I like " generally" are 2500-2600 grams at least. Manhole covers for you guys around here. Everything else is to low and doesn't get heard from the audience with my electric gigs. The exception is old K's and handmade cymbals, because they put enough bow in it to raise the pitch and give it stick click. Too many of the new Turkish 22's have no profile for me, they're too flat. So there's both a low pitch and less stick. " practice room cymbals" one friend calls them..

I'm mostly back to one or two 21's and a few 20 K's and a Bosphorous Turk. They're just easier somehow, I don't have to think about them as much.

But that's me
 


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