This Brady Does Not look like a Jarrah Ply

bongomania

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I don’t see “absence of multi ply rings”. I see what looks like three distinct ply colors. There might be more or less than three plies, but there are definitely three parts of different shades with a sharp line between them. Maybe it’s a question of each person’s screen resolution or whether they can enlarge the pic?

I’m not familiar with exactly how Brady did their block construction, but the inner layer is obviously a ply of some kind, and obviously not blocks.
 

bradydrums

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Hi Folks! It’s a ply shell. The badge and strainer fit the time period. The lugs aren’t ours, or original. I’d guess it’s an early 1989/1990 model, just before we moved into tube lugs. Might also explain the less than precise ply “seam” on the inside of the shell.
 

Markkuliini

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Hi Folks! It’s a ply shell. The badge and strainer fit the time period. The lugs aren’t ours, or original. I’d guess it’s an early 1989/1990 model, just before we moved into tube lugs. Might also explain the less than precise ply “seam” on the inside of the shell.
Nice! Thank you for putting us at ease.
 

mkelley

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Hi Folks! It’s a ply shell. The badge and strainer fit the time period. The lugs aren’t ours, or original. I’d guess it’s an early 1989/1990 model, just before we moved into tube lugs. Might also explain the less than precise ply “seam” on the inside of the shell.
Thanks Kelly. Hope you're doing well!
 

D. B. Cooper

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I'm sorry. I guess Ive been ignorant for a long time, but I thought "block" was synonymous with "stave" as in comprised of blocks of wood, not strips like a ply shell would be?
 

Fat Drummer

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As opposed to the segments of wood running top to bottom in a stave drum (vertical pieces of wood), a block shell is comprised of peices of wood glued up in a horizontal position like laying bricks in a circle.
 

D. B. Cooper

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As opposed to the segments of wood running top to bottom in a stave drum (vertical pieces of wood), a block shell is comprised of peices of wood glued up in a horizontal position like laying bricks in a circle.
Cool. Thanks.

Press on!
 

musiqman

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Block shells are a generally spoken a selection of building styles for snare.

Stave snares are vertical blocks:
73874DDC-B0C3-4E17-A489-5D871E1408E1.jpeg
C5598EF5-1BBE-439A-985D-48BB0B69665A.jpeg


Segmented snares have (smaller) vertical blocks:
082761DD-9AB2-4F38-BF32-A6F59F963F55.jpeg
 

Treviso1

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Never ever have I seen a ply drum with uneven ply seam running across the shell like that. Can you explain that detail?
How would one even manufacture such a shell?
Very simple...the inside of the drum is easily as smooth as the outside, without the gloss finish. That inside ply scarf at the seam was finely sanded down so that no ridge is present and as a result of sanding it down, some of the scarf got sanded down more than other parts and what you get is the squiggly seam. It wasn't made that way, it was simply sanded down and the end result is the squiggly seam at the scarf. Same as on a solid shell drum. Most have a squiggly seam not perfectly vertical because that scarf is sanded smooth.
 

Markkuliini

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Very simple...the inside of the drum is easily as smooth as the outside, without the gloss finish. That inside ply scarf at the seam was finely sanded down so that no ridge is present and as a result of sanding it down, some of the scarf got sanded down more than other parts and what you get is the squiggly seam. It wasn't made that way, it was simply sanded down and the end result is the squiggly seam at the scarf. Same as on a solid shell drum. Most have a squiggly seam not perfectly vertical because that scarf is sanded smooth.
I just don't understand the part that happens before. When putting the shell together, aren't individual plys cut to exact length so that they will just barely touch at the end, and this should not create any ridges. At least that's how most manufacturers make shells, and there's no ridge/overlapping plys.
I understand why that ply joint looks wiggly on single ply snares. Because the plank's ends are not cut to 90 degree angle but more like 30 degrees to get more glueing surface. So the .more you sand, more the line moves sideways But on ply drum there shouldn't be this kind of sideways curve inside the shell.
This baffles me...
Is their ply drum process totally different than others?
 

halldorl

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I just don't understand the part that happens before. When putting the shell together, aren't individual plys cut to exact length so that they will just barely touch at the end, and this should not create any ridges. At least that's how most manufacturers make shells, and there's no ridge/overlapping plys.
I understand why that ply joint looks wiggly on single ply snares. Because the plank's ends are not cut to 90 degree angle but more like 30 degrees to get more glueing surface. So the .more you sand, more the line moves sideways But on ply drum there shouldn't be this kind of sideways curve inside the shell.
This baffles me...
Is their ply drum process totally different than others?
I am no expert but I recall reading that Brady used somewhat different process with Jarrah ply drums due to the extreme hardness of the wood. I may be wrong though.

When I had my Bradys and was changing heads I was always amazed by how hard the wood felt. It was almost like glass or stone. They are truly one of a kind.
 


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