Thoughts on DW drums!

Ang

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"This is the closest most of us will come to a vintage Camco set in jazz sizes. The new Santa Monica replicates those early 6+6 maple shells comprised of thicker, 1/32" plies.

This shell pack consists of:

*14" (depth) x 18" (diameter) bass drum;
*8" x 12" mounted tom;
*14" x 14" floor tom; and
*5" x 14" snare drum."



"Ooooooookay...
And, it’s RED!
 

fenrir

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Few issues with this. That is the Taiwan Design series "Dw" and they use different sourced maple from all USA made kits. They are a budget model with Dw branding, shells are not at all the same. Also it had a tom mount on it, none of the others did. But you gotta love Camco
All toms had a mount
 

John DeChristopher

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I think one way DW (or any drum company) could gain a larger market share and vastly improve their image internationally would be to market a 100% US made entry-level kit for high school/college age kids that has all the professional elements in it at a price that's within the reach of a working class family.
Yamaha did a lot of things right when they got serious about getting into the US market, but as a multi-faceted international corporation, I'm sure they were able to take a loss (for years) on manufacturing drums in order to secure market share. American drum companies from the late 60's through the 80's were being tossed around in corporate acquisitions and as a result, dictates from their non-music oriented corporate over-lords led them to lose touch with their own customers.
In Yamaha's history of manufacturing drums, the number of years they showed a profit can be counted on one hand and you'd still have a finger or two leftover. They've never been a profit center for Yamaha Corporation. This is not a secret. All you need to do ask someone in the drum industry. And they've never had a market share anything close to what DW has now. They're great drums, but even in their heyday in the 80s/90s, they were the #3 Japanese drum company behind Tama and Pearl in the 80s, and Pearl and Tama in the 90s.

When DW officially/seriously entered the drum market in January 1987, it was because the remaining American drum companies (Ludwig and Gretsch) were on life support and they saw an opportunity for an American drum company. I was working there at the time and it was an uphill battle. Don Lombardi is one of the most honest, sincere, dedicated, focused and hardworking people I've ever known. Same with John Good. I've never cared for the lug design either, and have never owned a DW kit (I bought a used DW snare drum about 18 months ago), but I have nothing but respect for both Don and John for their incredible success and continued dedication. They've earned it.
 
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JimmySticks

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In Yamaha's history of manufacturing drums, the number of years they showed a profit can be counted on one hand and you'd still have a finger or two leftover. They've never been a profit center for Yamaha Corporation. This is not a secret. All you need to do ask someone in the drum industry. And they've never had a market share anything close to what DW has now. They're great drums, but even in their heyday in the 80s/90s, they were the #3 Japanese drum company behind Tama and Pearl in the 80s, and Pearl and Tama in the 90s.

When DW officially/seriously entered the drum market in January 1987, it was because the remaining American drum companies (Ludwig and Gretsch) were on life support and they saw an opportunity to for an American drum company. I was working there at the time and it was an uphill battle. Don Lombardi is one of the most honest, sincere, dedicated, focused and hardworking people I've ever known. Same with John Good. I've never cared for lug design either, and have never owned a DW kit (I bought a used DW snare drum about 18 months ago), but I have nothing but respect for both Don and John for their incredible success and continued dedication. They've earned it.
Well said.

I don't really get all the dislike for this company, especially from Americans. They pretty much revived the drum industry here and gave the opportunity for other Americans to get in the game while making Ludwig and Gretsch up there game. Dare I say, if they never went into business, would we even have any American drum builders around today? Maybe not.

You don't have to be a fanboy or anything of DW, but the vitriol unloaded on this company at times is a bit over the top.
 

noreastbob

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As a dw owner/player I've pondered the anti dw sentiment by many on the forum and came to the conclusion it's an artifact mostly inherent among the vintage enthusiasts. I think they feel like dw somehow trespassed and/or violated the holy shrine of Ludwig/Rogers/Slingerland.... and what's worse.....they succeeded mightily where the icons were floundering if not already relegated to the scrap heap of failed businesses.
That's all I can come up with as their stuff is fantastic.
 

JDA

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Either that or they tend to favors lows in their design, their philosophy, their general outlook.

I think it's that Good obsession with "lows" ---as if that's the end-all - and it is to some- be-all---- to tom toms..
It caught a segment of the market that wants to tension ---even the rods thread designed to be loose and stay put not fall out--- as low as possible.

to a Lot of drummers that's not their philosophy
they like the "medium" snap of the Ludwig of the 60s
the "high" Gretsch twang of the...err 0000"s

and other points in-between...
 
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JDA

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:D



:(



:D

Maybe it's having them set as 'wet cement pillows; it's Easier on those old guys hands? Yeah that's it ;)
Graeme Edge...Nick Mason....
 
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rculberson

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Great examples of guys traditionally known for their sardine can tight jazz sounds. ;) All I said is they can be tuned higher and sound pretty good doing it. I got mine pretty high up to stretch out the new heads I put on. They sounded great, but now that the heads are properly stretched I’ve got them back down in that low, unicorn tear, fairy dust-sprinkled magic realm of muddy thud that Good brainwashed me into against my will and better judgement. Please don’t tell the thought police that I had them up above wrinkle, though, OK?
 
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JDA

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I didn't know you "retired" Ryno ;)
the "Gold Watch after 55 years of continuous service drums. you've earned the relaxation.
Last month may have been yamaha or something else Now it time to spend the rest of your days with the heavenly from 8" to 26"

they're retirement drums. uh- oh that's gonna catch me some flak..:D
"Welcome in Sir I see I see It's time to retire. Would you like that in Tulip Heartwood? Horizontal, vertical or maybe a little of both? might be your preference? no hurry no hurry? take your time we have all day..You've reached the End there's nothing after this..."
 
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rculberson

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Joe, you know me too well! Next week I’ll probably have moved on to Mapex or Dixon. I do think the DW drums I’ve fallen into are pretty cool and make sounds I enjoy. So do the Yamaha’s, as did the Yamaha’s before them, and the Camco’s, blah blah blah... LOL. Right now I’m digging the fit an finish of the “everything round” DW’s. They remind me of the female form. The proper thickness and all the round things attached are easy on my eyes.
 
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JDA

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I do think the DW drums I’ve fallen into are pretty cool and make sounds I enjoy.
Let's hear em Bro when you got a ' Mo (see how cool Joe is)

I wanna hear 'em I want to hear you playing them.
wait. what snare are you using
 

rculberson

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Let's hear em Bro when you got a ' Mo (see how cool Joe is)

I wanna hear 'em I want to hear you playing them.
wait. what snare are you using
I’ll try to whip up something. Will most likely be a sh!tty cell phone recording so quality may not be there. I’ve got the ‘79 Black Beauty set up with the Pete Thomas DW set currently. BB is one of the few pieces I wouldn’t consider turning over.
 
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gra7

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Even though it's HEAVY, I love DW hardware, hi-hat stands and pedals.

When I was in the market for a new drum kit in August 2020, I tried 6 kits - Pearl Reference Pure, DW Design Series, DW Collectors Series, Yamaha Absolute Maple, Tama Star and Tama Starclassic

I ended up with a one up two down Starclassic Walnut/Birch and I really loved both Tama kits. Unfortunately there were no DW Collectors kits other than one with an 18" kick drum, which was too small for my needs, but boy that small kick had some resonance. The Design Series was on par with the Pearl Reference kit for me. The Yamaha left me feeling a little underwhelmed.

If that DW Collectors kit was with a 22" kick, dare I say, I would have been flipping a coin between that and the Tama kits.
 

DanRH

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I’ll add that I know a pretty well known guy who’s a DW endorser and when he plays locally in cover bands you only see him on vintage Ludwig or Rogers kits. Not sure what that’s saying.
For me, I just grew tired of my Collector kit. It was my only kit for about six years in the late 90’s. I got over the vibe and moved on. I bought a couple more in the proceeding years but never felt them so I moved on. Kept the hardware I did...
 

CigarScott

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In Yamaha's history of manufacturing drums, the number of years they showed a profit can be counted on one hand and you'd still have a finger or two leftover. They've never been a profit center for Yamaha Corporation. This is not a secret. All you need to do ask someone in the drum industry. And they've never had a market share anything close to what DW has now. They're great drums, but even in their heyday in the 80s/90s, they were the #3 Japanese drum company behind Tama and Pearl in the 80s, and Pearl and Tama in the 90s.
Weren't the Sakae family or family who made Sakae making all of Yamaha's drums? If so, it would make sense that it wasn't a profit generator if they farmed it all out to another company.
 


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