Throwing Copper

Mcjnic

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I located the following from the engineer from Pachyderm Studio ... unfortunately, the only thing I could dig up about the snare was that it “might” have been a Pearl Piccolo. Sorry.

Recording was done at Pachyderm in August of 1993. Jerry Harrison produced. When I arrived at the studio, there were giant road cases of his gear which turned out to be a 16-channel Pro Tools rig, the biggest one available. It had 442 interfaces and ran on a Mac II FX. The primary recording medium was a pair of Studer 827s, and the Pro Tools was used for a few (less than you can count on one hand) drum fixes and comping of various overdubs. The basic track of every song was recorded live, with all members performing. There were enough iso booths to keep the drums alone in the big room. Lots of mics on drums, 421 inside kick, D12 outside, 57 & 451 on top snare, 57 underneath, 421s top & bottom toms, close & far room mics. Reference vocals were used quite a bit in the comps; Ed felt that they had more spirit than some of the overdub takes. If you listen carefully, you can hear the sound of the pick on the strings of his electric guitar. The vocal mic was a large diaphram tube condenser, either an AKG C12 or Telefunken 251, through a John Hardy preamp into an 1176 then straight to tape. I had to ride the gain on the Hardy constantly to get good levels, and the variable gain pot worked well for that. His amp was on the other side of the control room, connected with regular guitar cables. There was awful hum, and Jerry Harrison was proud to show off a prototype copy of DINR, which sort of got rid of the hum but added some bizarre anti-aliasing artifacts (broken glass tinkling sounds). There may have been a few 2" edits, but most of the songs are one take continuous. Guitar overdubs were split to three amps, a Marshall, Fender and Vox AC-30.

The Neve 8068 was not in good shape and needed a bit of pounding to get the noise out. I'm amazed that most of the problems were in the monitor section and never made it to tape. I have to say this was one of the most enjoyable recording sessions of my career, where everyone does their job well and you actually go out to dinner each night. All band members performed their parts in a few takes, they were amazingly easy to record. One night during guitar overdubs, there was an unbelievable electrical storm and through the big picture windows of the studio, the recording room flashed like a strobe light for hours. And no, we were not recording Lightning Crashes, it was The Damn At Otter Creek.

If there anything else I can fill in, let me know.

Lou G.
 

Ptrick

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Back then his go to live was a pearl free floating brass piccolo. Whether or not he used this to record, I don’t know.
 

Johnny D

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Here's Chad's reply... "Heya John! It was a Pearl free floating brass piccolo. I still have it. Now Tom Lord Alge did a little manipulation! Great to hear from you!"

So there it is... it was indeed his Pearl free floating brass piccolo. He's playing DW Drums now (FYI)
 
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Nacci

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Here's Chad's reply... "Heya John! It was a Pearl free floating brass piccolo. I still have it. Now Tom Lord Alge did a little manipulation! Great to hear from you!"

So there it is... it was indeed his Pearl free floating piccolo. He's playing DW Drums now (FYI)
Well done Johnny, man that is impressive. For everything that goes on at this forum that was impressive.

I sold all of my drums when I was 19 when I moved out of my folks place. When I finally bought a kit again at 21 it came with a 3-1/2” Pearl Brass Freefloater. Not long after this I ran into someone who changed the whole way I approached the drums. One day he said to me; man that snare of yours sound so good good, can I buy it off you? I gave it to him on the spot.

Must be something serious about that snare.
 

polycrescendo

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That's my first store bought snare. Got it for half off at $150, and they still go for that. It's been to more battle of the bands/dive bars than I can count years ago and it always held it's own dispite the shallow shell. A lot of cool features on that drum when you take a close look.
 

El Larry

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This is a really cool thread, awesome how small the world can be!!!!! I saw Live at a Lallapalooza, maybe 97 or 98 in Mountain View, Ca. If I remember rjght, hazy, somewhat hazy, lol.
 
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drummertom

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ok, John, who don't you know?! :)

I had one of those pearl ff piccolo's with a brass shell and a maple shell. Great snare!
 

Tornado

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Amazing the piccolo got to sound like it did
Now, remember "Tom Lord Alge did a little manipulation!"

Something to keep in mind. All those records from the 90s with amazing drums were mixed by guys like him and Brenden O'Brian. Turns out those guys were doing things I didn't even think was possible until more recent times. Which itself is an amazing feat. But what we hear on those records may or may not have much resemblance to how they sounded prior to going into the mic.
 

sabian guy

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Go
Now, remember "Tom Lord Alge did a little manipulation!"

Something to keep in mind. All those records from the 90s with amazing drums were mixed by guys like him and Brenden O'Brian. Turns out those guys were doing things I didn't even think was possible until more recent times. Which itself is an amazing feat. But what we hear on those records may or may not have much resemblance to how they sounded prior to going into the mic.
Good point
 


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