Today I did an inventory of my late friend's drum gear for his widow...

drummer5359

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We started at 11:30 in the morning and worked until 5:30 in the afternoon. We took our time. All of Bill's gear was meticulously packed and stacked. I was super careful handling everything.

First I figured out what was in each case or bag and sorted them out, figuring out what went with what.

Then I pulled each piece out, took photos and described each piece. (Brand, size , finish, hoops, throw off, etc... weights of the cymbals.) Bill's widow took notes.

It was two kits, twelve cymbals, six snare drums, various orphan pieces, and a lot of hardware.

Lots of lifting, unpacking, repacking, stacking...

I'm old. I took breaks when my my back and legs told me that I needed to.

The whole time we talked and told stories about Bill and laughed. He told her that I should be the one to help. He knew that was a gear geek, he and I thought the world of each other, and he trusted me to take care of this for him. I'm humbled and honored to be tasked with this, but it is a lot of work. I am going to do this the best way that I know how.

I'm on the road for the next few days. When I get back in town the next step is to do the homework and figure out what it is all worth, and how I'm going to help her sell it. There are a couple of high end snares, and some nice cymbals. One of the kits is desirable and should not be a problem to sell. The other is very unique and might take more effort to find the right buyer. I don't want to get into what the gear is at this point, but it's quite likely that I will reach out to the group here for help in the near future.

I want to figure out fair pricing and take care of my friend's widow. This is all about her.





Bill lived an hour and fifteen minutes north of the city. When he was sick I would drive up to get him once a week, drive him to the city for his treatments, and drive him home after. We talked a lot about drums and drumming and had heart to hearts about life. We were friends before this, but got really close while he was going through his health nightmare. I miss him.





The other part of where my mind is at is that I'm wrapping my head around what an undertaking that this is.

I don't have six snare drums, I have forty one. I don't have two drum sets, I have three and a shell bank. I don't have twelve cymbals, I have forty. He had a lot of hardware, I likely have three times as much. And then there is my bass gear, lighting, PA gear...

I have good friends who I know would not hesitate to do the same thing for my wife that I'm doing for his. But I now realize what an undertaking and responsibility that I'd be laying on others.




Part of what I'm going to be weighing as I travel this week is how to not put my wife and my friends through this.
 

Treviso1

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Part of what I'm going to be weighing as I travel this week is how to not put my wife and my friends through this.
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Yes, exactly! That's what I have been thinking about too. I have a huge collection of drums and the last thing I want to do is burden my family with such a Herculean task. You are a good man, Mike.
 

esooy

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I'm sorry for the loss of your friend. Thank you for being such a good friend after his passing and taking care of this for his widow.
 

lossforgain

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Good job, Mike. I’ve been through something like this too and it certainly can be tough in some ways, good in others. I’m glad she has your help so that his gear will benefit her in the end and she won’t be taken advantage of. And I love that you were able to enjoy memories of Bill together! This process will only help cement those memories for years to come. Bless you for your good work.
 

jmato

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Sorry for your loss, Mike. Kudos to you for helping out.

I am about to embark on the same project for some very good friends of mine, who lost their son/brother. He had a large collection of very high-end drums and gear. Our process will be the same. I suspect many of the items will go up for sale here on DFO in a few weeks.
 

Deafmoon

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The biggest problem with most drums is they are not wine or cheese. Parts, even less so. Some vintage names may carry a bit of weight, but certainly not like guitars. Streamline to what you need first. Then to what you want. Then, what is leftover, sell it off or give it away.
 

wflkurt

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I have a pretty decent collection of stuff. While I am only 50, I have pretty much taken inventory of the things I have. I have one of those old parts cabinets with various parts in it from years of collecting. I would love to organize that in to bags so it would make that easy. I think I want to get to a point where every vintage set I own has dedicated vintage hardware (stands, pedals). I'm thing if I got multi color dots, I could color code each hardware to a set. It's hard to think about the future this way but you really never know how life is going to go. I certainly would not want to burden anyone with all of my stuff.

I am very sorry for the loss of your friend and hope you are able to get everything taken care of for his widow.
 

gbow

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Great job Mike, what a great friend you are. I'm sure the whole family appreciates what you're doing.

This is why I keep all my drums spread out, haha. I have kits in 3 states, in studios, practice rooms, etc. I've told my wife as far as I'm concerned, the studios and other places I have things, they can all just have them and use them. Unless she wants them. It is a big undertaking.

gabo
 

m_anderson

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My hat is off to you. I definitely know where you are coming from. I did the same thing with my drum teacher's wife when he passed about five years ago, but my job was much easier because she is not letting anything go. I helped buy hard cases for storage and packed everything up. It was really a tough thing to do. He'd been my teacher and friend since I was fourteen. I was there when the kids were born and was part of the family. My Dad once told me when it's all said and done, you will be able to count your real friends on one hand. I believe this is true. My drum teacher's name was also Bill.
 

Dumpy

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With my health problems, this has been preoccupying me for the last three years. This is a great thing you’re doing.
 

drummingbulldog

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I've done this already and it is hard. My friend had one kit/set of cymbals/a rack & hardware too. I ended up selling his kit online & I packed it flawlessly. To me, it was eerie. It made me think about my spare room/studio & garage where all my stuff is stored. We all who are approaching 50 or like me, over at 51, should do a complete inventory. I have kits I haven't played in years. Cymbals I can't find. It's insane having a ton of gear for so many reasons. I love shopping & finding deals. Trying new gear. I have come to the conclusion that I would like to buy an early 80s Jasper Gretsch kit with lots of standard size toms & just sell everything else.
 

JazzDoc

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We started at 11:30 in the morning and worked until 5:30 in the afternoon. We took our time. All of Bill's gear was meticulously packed and stacked. I was super careful handling everything.

First I figured out what was in each case or bag and sorted them out, figuring out what went with what.

Then I pulled each piece out, took photos and described each piece. (Brand, size , finish, hoops, throw off, etc... weights of the cymbals.) Bill's widow took notes.

It was two kits, twelve cymbals, six snare drums, various orphan pieces, and a lot of hardware.

Lots of lifting, unpacking, repacking, stacking...

I'm old. I took breaks when my my back and legs told me that I needed to.

The whole time we talked and told stories about Bill and laughed. He told her that I should be the one to help. He knew that was a gear geek, he and I thought the world of each other, and he trusted me to take care of this for him. I'm humbled and honored to be tasked with this, but it is a lot of work. I am going to do this the best way that I know how.

I'm on the road for the next few days. When I get back in town the next step is to do the homework and figure out what it is all worth, and how I'm going to help her sell it. There are a couple of high end snares, and some nice cymbals. One of the kits is desirable and should not be a problem to sell. The other is very unique and might take more effort to find the right buyer. I don't want to get into what the gear is at this point, but it's quite likely that I will reach out to the group here for help in the near future.

I want to figure out fair pricing and take care of my friend's widow. This is all about her.





Bill lived an hour and fifteen minutes north of the city. When he was sick I would drive up to get him once a week, drive him to the city for his treatments, and drive him home after. We talked a lot about drums and drumming and had heart to hearts about life. We were friends before this, but got really close while he was going through his health nightmare. I miss him.





The other part of where my mind is at is that I'm wrapping my head around what an undertaking that this is.

I don't have six snare drums, I have forty one. I don't have two drum sets, I have three and a shell bank. I don't have twelve cymbals, I have forty. He had a lot of hardware, I likely have three times as much. And then there is my bass gear, lighting, PA gear...

I have good friends who I know would not hesitate to do the same thing for my wife that I'm doing for his. But I now realize what an undertaking and responsibility that I'd be laying on others.




Part of what I'm going to be weighing as I travel this week is how to not put my wife and my friends through this.
God bless you for doing this. Truly extraordinary how meticulously you’re doing it and what a huge job this is. It’a a selfless act of a friend. Not everyone would be willing.

You are in a similar situation with your own gear as I am. Tremendous amount of gear of high quality. So I’m in the process of divesting right now, so that I don’t burden my wife after I kick. Worst part is selling items I absolutely love knowing it took years of buying, selling and trading to cull the best of the best!

God luck with this massive profect.
 


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