Tongxiang cymbals?

Chang

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I just got the laser etched Tongxiang Hi Hat - will probably invest in the TNC range too but v impressed with this first purchase (and not just for the awesome artwork-look!). Living in China its fairly easy to get hold of them and I'm in touch with the company directly. I have reviewed it as one of my last videos on my site www.changfan.site although the site majors on "Chang" cymbals.
 

Chang

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Hey JS. I got them direct from Tongxiang (I live in China so easy contact). Hoping to get the rest of the etched set soon! (To see them in action see one of the latest vids on my site www.changfan.site) I'm in direct contact with the tongxiang guys so let me know if you are interested in getting some and i'll get some details to you.

Cheers
 

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jshand

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Chang said:
Hey JS. I got them direct from Tongxiang (I live in China so easy contact). Hoping to get the rest of the etched set soon! (To see them in action see one of the latest vids on my site www.changfan.site) I'm in direct contact with the tongxiang guys so let me know if you are interested in getting some and i'll get some details to you.

Cheers
I'd definitely be interested in getting some more info/details. PM me when you have a chance. Thx!
 

Chang

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My Tongxiang set just arrived (2 in fact - I now have the full laser etched set of TS's but I am setting up and reviewing the more expensive TZS set first, comparing it to the slightly cheaper Chang AB Stage). I'll post the review vid on my site (www.changfan.site) within a week or so although i want to focus on the AB stage first. The tongxiang have it on the looks though!
 

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Chang

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Notes on Sound test of two Mid/High Level Chinese Made Cymbal Sets:
Chang AB Stage (ABS) and Tongxiang TZS
www.changfan.site (see site for video reviews)

Aim and Background:

Here I was particularly looking to find better examples of Rides and Hi-Hats than I had tested in the previous tests of the Changs DEV and Zildjian S, but without having to splash out on big names. My aim was to test out a representative cymbal set of what these companies were offering in their higher mid ranges and was seeking versatile cymbals that were also compatible with more rocky styles in a manner that the earlier tested Chang DE Vintage (DEV) were clearly not, (the DEVs being far more suited to lighter forms of music).

These two ranges (Chang AB Stage and Tongxiang TZS) are representative sets of the mid/high range of each company. At least at a wholesale level the Tongxiang TZS are 15-20% more expensive than the Chang AB Stage, but I was happy to consider them broadly in the same price category.

Result
Whilst being vastly different in character, both of these sets were impressive. The Rides (both) and the Hi Hat (AB Stage) represented a vast improvement in expression/tone etc than the previous Zildjian S or Chang DE Vintage. The previous Ride issues such as the lack of power and expression on the bell (DEV) were entirely (TZS) or for the most part (ABS) cured. No discordant ring (as in Zildjian S) was noted on either the ABS or the TZS though the ring on the TZS was far longer.

In addition, whilst I was delighted to find that whilst these two sets pretty much ticked every box, I was pleased and interested to discover that they were vastly different feel (as well as look) to these two cymbal sets.

Overview Chang AB Stage

The Changs were bright versatile cymbals with tonal clarity, sweetness (ride) and in every way seemed to me fuller and, for want of a better expression, more expensive sounding, than their DEV forerunners. Changs own description balance, all-round series, flexibility and variation in tone, and clear definition, I would completely concur it describes them perfectly! However, possibly in the attempt to maintain their broad versatility, they have only moved half the distance in power and penetration, (with exception of the Hi Hat and the bell on the 18). They remain, particularly when placed alongside the TZS range, quieter and with much shorter rings or Fast cut as Chang accurately puts it. The snappy, crisp, balanced Hi Hat with a good measure of penetration, (more so than the rest of the kit) was a great relief. I do expect the whole set would sound fantastic which miked-up and, in this way I wonder if the AB Stage might be better called AB Studio because I feel these cymbals with their warm, versatile but still slightly delicate tones would be better picked up in a recording studio than in a Gig stetting. Certainly, in terms of heavier live forms of music, drummers might be better leaning toward Tongxiangs TZS (see below) or Changs more dedicated heavy music cymbals (Chang AP or, at the higher price range, the Immortal Brilliant series). However for anything up to and including Alternative Rock, this set would also be a peach in a live setting, but moving up to Hard Rock and Metal best look elsewhere.

Overview Tongxiang TZS
The fantastic look of these highly polished brilliant-finish cymbals is the first thing that hits you if looks are important these shimmering around you as you play will look fantastic. In contrast to the Chang AB, the overall feel of these cymbals is more darkness, more shimmer (in look and sound!) and a far more powerful and penetrating sound than the Chang ABS. In the two objectives of these two sets, the first (versatility) is clearly awarded to the Chang ABS, the second (suitable for rock and heavier music forms), goes hands-down to the Tongxiangs TZS with long sustain and far more power and penetration than the Changs. The 18 is a particular highlight of the kit, a fantastic shimmering low-tone crash and a similar theme runs across the kit where long-sustains and low/dark tones are the order of the day (If I have the courage, Ill borrow a set of Zildjian Ks to test them alongside!). The only possible disappointment is the HiHat which, for me does not quite match the maturity and clear power and sound quality of the rest of the set. But overall a fantastic looking and sounding set ideal for a gig setting.

In Short - Who wins ? (Entirely depends on what you are looking for!)
Cost= ABS
Looks = TZS
Power/penetration/volume= TZS.
Brightness and tonal clarity= ABS.
Darkness and shimmer = TZS
Versatility = ABS.
Heavy forms of Music = TZS
Lighter forms of Music= ABS
Medium/Alternative Rock = Subjective
Long Ring/Sustain/Decay = TZS.
Short Ring/Sustain/Decay = ABS.

*For reference: The Chang ABS 6-Cymbal Set is currently retailing at $379 + Postage from China [for postage, on average, add about another $100 to the U.S] *
 

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MaddMatt

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I remain very pleased with the 3 Tongxiang cymbals I purchased. Cymbal opinions are like belly buttons, everyone has one. If you are looking for something different that very few people have, these look and sound great, particularly for the $. I had 16" and 14" crashes, and a 10" splash shipped to my door from China for $150. Hard to beat.
 

cplueard

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Just ordered a TH a set and a TMZ set to test out. 14 hats, 16 crash, 20 ride in both sets. Less than $500 shipped. That should give me two sets of sound to work with a across all my gigs. I've got high hopes as I'd like to switch all my gear to stuff that I don't mind having stolen nearly as much as I currently do.
 

cplueard

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Got them in last week, they're okay. The 20 TMZ ride is decent, but far too light to maintain stick definition for anyone playing anywhere close to loud. The 14 TMZ hats are okay, nothing great but not bad. They're like playing a slightly darker and drier ZBT. The 16 TMZ crash is terrible, absolutely no body or shimmer. Solo it sounds okay at best, but in a mix it just sounds like you're squeezing the air out of something, it just goes "psssshhh" and it's done. Maybe a decent effect cymbal if you can find the use, but I'd never use it as a crash.

The 20 TH ride is like the big brother to the TMZ crash. It's just a dull clunk with a little tiny bit of cymbal sound to it. Again, a great effect cymbal or would be cool as a side ride for soloing stuff, but really kinda useless as a main ride, and it can't crash despite the light weight. The 16 TH crash is the same sound as the TMZ crash but with a bit of body and shimmer, it's useable but not my first choice. Hats are the same as the TMZ but a bit drier and darker, not too bad.

So with everything from the sets I have two useable hats, one mid-low volume ride and a mediocre crash. I plan on taking the mediocre crash and mixing it with an SR2 HHX to make what I hope will be a pretty nice set of darker 16" hats. ANd I can use the okay ride with either hats or that 16" set hats and suppliment with a decent 17" saluda crash I have.

To me these cymbals sound like they use identical processes and blanks as Saluda does. You could probably get a real banging set of cymbals for not a huge amount by picking a series, ordering in excess, then getting a US cymbalsmith to do modifications. I bet you'd end up somewhere in the range of a lot of the mass produced turkish stuff for a lot less. Were I the same as Chang and could deal with these more in person they would be an absolute steal as I could really build a good stable for very little dollars, but being unable to choose what I get based on sound I'd say they are appropriately priced, and not a bad option. You just need some luck to make it worth it.
 

johnjssmith

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Sorry to resurrect an old-ish thread, I recently got a 20" TMZ ride and wanted to post some impressions myself.

I agree with cplueard on that it's pretty light, mine weights about 1870g, and it has little stick definition when played medium and very little to no stick definition when played loud, it has that same crumpling paper sound that a lot of very light rides and crash/rides have, see the sound sample for the dream bliss 20" crash/ride on their website for a fairly good idea of what I mean.
You can fight this by playing closer to the bell on the half-lathed portion of the cymbal and that works well enough when playing medium but really doesn't when playing loud.
Can't say how it would sound with nylon tipped sticks but I can't imagine it sounding much more defined and ping-y.
It has a ridiculous amount of washy undertones, the sound isn't exactly like that of rivets but the amount of "wwWWWSSSSsshhshhshhshhshhh" is bigger than on any riveted cymbal I've tried.
Very very trashy, pretty low frequency overtones, with a small build-up, a bit like a gong, very much noticeable when you crash it.
I wouldn't use it as a ride for anything other than jazz, light acoustic gigs and stuff of that kind.

It really works as a crash though in my opinion.
It's not explosive or anything, more like a gong in a sense, there's a bit of a buildup lasting like 1 second from the hit when the sound is a bit brighter (but still darker than, say, a 20" k crash), then it reaches peak wwwssshhh and it decays nicely, it has quite a long, linear decay.

I'll be sure to post some sound samples as soon as I find the time to record decent ones.

EDIT:
Here are some decent samples - youtu.be/R3OuUnadKh0
---
Luca
 
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jbormann

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Sorry to get an old thread going again but has anybody else tried these out? I'm in the market for new cymbals with a budget. Problem is anything other than Saluda is just out of my reach for ones I actually like. Not really wanting to get "meh, they're OK" cymbals but I have to ditch my ZBT's like yesterday. I was looking into their higher end lines and for 15" hats, 17" & 19" crashes, and 21" ride it's like $600 shipped. They visually look like Meinl Byzance Traditionals but there's only one YT clip of them done with a phone (and even then they sound pretty good).
 

lrod1707

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Sorry to get an old thread going again but has anybody else tried these out? I'm in the market for new cymbals with a budget. Problem is anything other than Saluda is just out of my reach for ones I actually like. Not really wanting to get "meh, they're OK" cymbals but I have to ditch my ZBT's like yesterday. I was looking into their higher end lines and for 15" hats, 17" & 19" crashes, and 21" ride it's like $600 shipped. They visually look like Meinl Byzance Traditionals but there's only one YT clip of them done with a phone (and even then they sound pretty good).
Go into the Amazon deals thread: We find and post bargains everyday. Turkish cymbals: Istanbul Mehmet & Soultone. And sometimes you see some Sabian stuff too. I switched out all my cymbals to Turkish by doing this. No reason to go for those Tongxiang even if your on a budget. If you definitely want to go Chinese, you can check Dream or just go Wuhan. Wuhan has upped what they make and sounds good. And Dream has really good bargains on Amazon sometimes.
Here:
https://www.drumforum.org/threads/amazon-deals-thread.124803/
 

Iristone

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China's cymbal making seems a bit inactive these days. Some better known brands like Chang and Firce no longer seem to market their newer products, and give only very brief introductions on their websites.
Admittedly, as a Chinese man I have a soft spot for MIC goods, but they are mostly making good products... until maybe the Spring Festival break? There might be more coming on the way. :wink:
 

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