Tool's Danny Carey is a great jazz drummer???

JazzDrumGuy

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I don't know much Tool. I've heard about D.C. Anyways, on the Bay Area jazz station this morning, I heard an interview with Don Randi, the owner of the Baked Potato jazz club in L.A. He was talking about the newer generation of players - Larry Carlton's son is a drummer, Lee Ritenour's son is a bassist, and he mentioned that D.C., the drummer of Tool, has been hanging out jamming at his club and is quite an amazing jazz player???
 

Sonorlite

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JazzDrumGuy said:
I don't know much Tool. I've heard about D.C. Anyways, on the Bay Area jazz station this morning, I heard an interview with Don Randi, the owner of the Baked Potato jazz club in L.A. He was talking about the newer generation of players - Larry Carlton's son is a drummer, Lee Ritenour's son is a bassist, and he mentioned that D.C., the drummer of Tool, has been hanging out jamming at his club and is quite an amazing jazz player???
Other way around - Travis has toured with Larry and others. :)
 

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Didn't surprise me to read that, but some Googling revealed that he studied with a former Morello student and did some playing in the Kansas City jazz scene. He's got a pretty strong classical percussion background as well. He's just one of those guys.
 

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I didn't expect to read that. My reference of the jazziest, well-known drummers who were great at rock would be Mitch Mitchell and Jimmy Chamberlain. I'm sure there are plenty more, though.

From the other side of the coin, one other who mainly played jazz, but with rock-like power and definition would be Tony Williams.
 

Sonorlite

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Cauldronics said:
I didn't expect to read that. My reference of the jazziest, well-known drummers who were great at rock would be Mitch Mitchell and Jimmy Chamberlain. I'm sure there are plenty more, though.

From the other side of the coin, one other who mainly played jazz, but with rock-like power and definition would be Tony Williams.
Slot Simon Phillips in there too - he grew up playing in his fathers Jazz Band. :)
 

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Seen Carey at The Baked Potato 3 Times. Hes a bad mofo playing drums in Tool. Hes not a bad mofo when attempting to play jazz, IMHO. The guys he was playing with each time were light years ahead of him when in the jazz time-space continuum. Doug Webb, Jon Ziegler, Jimmy Earle and some others Im forgetting. DC seemed out of his element, to me.
 

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JazzDrumGuy said:
I don't know much Tool. I've heard about D.C. Anyways, on the Bay Area jazz station this morning, I heard an interview with Don Randi, the owner of the Baked Potato jazz club in L.A. He was talking about the newer generation of players - Larry Carlton's son is a drummer, Lee Ritenour's son is a bassist, and he mentioned that D.C., the drummer of Tool, has been hanging out jamming at his club and is quite an amazing jazz player???
Go find the album Aenima. Youtube, itunes, spotify whatever. Then sit down and really listen to it. You will no longer be surprised.
 

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rculberson said:
Seen Carey at The Baked Potato 3 Times. Hes a bad mofo playing drums in Tool. Hes not a bad mofo when attempting to play jazz, IMHO. The guys he was playing with each time were light years ahead of him when in the jazz time-space continuum. Doug Webb, Jon Ziegler, Jimmy Earle and some others Im forgetting. DC seemed out of his element, to me.
This would have been my guess - great player, at his best in the stylistic context for which he is best known - no shame in that.
 

bigbonzo

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Surprised I didn't see this thread the first time around.

I'm not surprised to hear Danny's playing jazz. You can hear the influence in his playing with Tool.

I have Adrian Belew's CD's titled Side One and Side Three, which Danny plays on.

I am also a big Tool fan.
 

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Tmcfour said:
I don't know much Tool. I've heard about D.C. Anyways, on the Bay Area jazz station this morning, I heard an interview with Don Randi, the owner of the Baked Potato jazz club in L.A. He was talking about the newer generation of players - Larry Carlton's son is a drummer, Lee Ritenour's son is a bassist, and he mentioned that D.C., the drummer of Tool, has been hanging out jamming at his club and is quite an amazing jazz player???
Go find the album Aenima. Youtube, itunes, spotify whatever. Then sit down and really listen to it. You will no longer be surprised.
Wont be finding tool on itunes or spotify actually
 

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Danny is a bad SOB on the drums with Tool and his other hard rock side projects, but when hes out of that element he doesnt seem to fit into the music. For example he filled in for Primus and didnt quite mesh with those guys.. And I've seen some of the Baked Potato footage. Its cool, but he seems like hes still doing his heavy handed hard hitting stuff, which doesnt fit the tunes.

Tool Newbies should check out nima through 10,000 days if you want to check out cool proggy drumming. The first two releases, a short EP "Opiate" and Lp "Undertow" are both great too, but they are more straight forward hard rock
 

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Not surprised! A lot of dudes learn jazz in school or whatever. The chops you learn from learning jazz are applicable to AN-Y-THING.

Another guy who's a sweet jazz drummer is the drummer from The Spin Doctors, Aarom Comess.
 

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Cauldronics said:
I didn't expect to read that. My reference of the jazziest, well-known drummers who were great at rock would be Mitch Mitchell and Jimmy Chamberlain. I'm sure there are plenty more, though.

From the other side of the coin, one other who mainly played jazz, but with rock-like power and definition would be Tony Williams.
And Steve Smith.
 

rondrums51

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I'll believe it when I see a video of him playing with serious jazz players. Jazz is a lifestyle. You devote your life to it.

Maybe I'm wrong and the guy is the next Elvin Jones, but I seriously doubt it.
 

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rondrums51 said:
I'll believe it when I see a video of him playing with serious jazz players. Jazz is a lifestyle. You devote your life to it.
But isn't that true of most musical genres - even most art forms in general.

You know, I have the highest respect for jazz and am quite aware of the lifestyle that you speak... but I also feel that this whole lifestyle concept can get a bit over-romanticized. Much like the whole "rock band that grew up together" notion.

So if a cat can play, he can play... if he can play AND be a real estate agent... then he can still play.

Sorry I grew up in LA surrounded by phenomenal jazz players... Shelly, Shank and on and on - that all passed on the cliched jazz lifestyle, choosing instead a more comfortable lifestyle working in the studio, while continuing to still create some significantly cool music.

But I get everyone doesn't share my outlook on this.
 

rondrums51

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dcrigger said:
I'll believe it when I see a video of him playing with serious jazz players. Jazz is a lifestyle. You devote your life to it.
But isn't that true of most musical genres - even most art forms in general.

You know, I have the highest respect for jazz and am quite aware of the lifestyle that you speak... but I also feel that this whole lifestyle concept can get a bit over-romanticized. Much like the whole "rock band that grew up together" notion.

So if a cat can play, he can play... if he can play AND be a real estate agent... then he can still play.

Sorry I grew up in LA surrounded by phenomenal jazz players... Shelly, Shank and on and on - that all passed on the cliched jazz lifestyle, choosing instead a more comfortable lifestyle working in the studio, while continuing to still create some significantly cool music.

But I get everyone doesn't share my outlook on this.
I'm cool with that. Look at Steve Smith. He got famous with a rock band, but he also did his jazz homework, and he's a legitimate jazz player.

You're right about the LA guys like Shelly Manne, et al. In the latter part of their careers, they made most of their money in the studios because jazz wasn't paying any money. It's just reality.

When I say "Jazz is a lifestyle," I don't mean to be provincial. It's just that the guts of jazz go way back to Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Lester Young, et al.--and beyond. It's virtually impossible for younger drummer to get that, simply because they didn't grow up with it. They don't get the chance to go to jazz clubs and play with older guys like I did. That's where you really learn.

I've recently heard younger guys like Willie Jones III who really have the whole history of jazz in their playing. It's great, but I hope those guys can make a career in jazz. It's like "the road less traveled."
 

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rondrums51 said:
I'll believe it when I see a video of him playing with serious jazz players. Jazz is a lifestyle. You devote your life to it.
But isn't that true of most musical genres - even most art forms in general.

You know, I have the highest respect for jazz and am quite aware of the lifestyle that you speak... but I also feel that this whole lifestyle concept can get a bit over-romanticized. Much like the whole "rock band that grew up together" notion.

So if a cat can play, he can play... if he can play AND be a real estate agent... then he can still play.

Sorry I grew up in LA surrounded by phenomenal jazz players... Shelly, Shank and on and on - that all passed on the cliched jazz lifestyle, choosing instead a more comfortable lifestyle working in the studio, while continuing to still create some significantly cool music.

But I get everyone doesn't share my outlook on this.
I'm cool with that. Look at Steve Smith. He got famous with a rock band, but he also did his jazz homework, and he's a legitimate jazz player.

You're right about the LA guys like Shelly Manne, et al. In the latter part of their careers, they made most of their money in the studios because jazz wasn't paying any money. It's just reality.

When I say "Jazz is a lifestyle," I don't mean to be provincial. It's just that the guts of jazz go way back to Coleman Hawkins, Ben Webster, Lester Young, et al.--and beyond. It's virtually impossible for younger drummer to get that, simply because they didn't grow up with it. They don't get the chance to go to jazz clubs and play with older guys like I did. That's where you really learn.

I've recently heard younger guys like Willie Jones III who really have the whole history of jazz in their playing. It's great, but I hope those guys can make a career in jazz. It's like "the road less traveled."




Not really disagreeing - except to point out that for a "living" art form to survive, the point of entry must evolve. What was required listening for us starting out 40 years ago (for example) must be different for those starting now - or those that 10 years ago, or 20 years ago. And while of course the guts of jazz go back that far - the entry level for legitimacy within the current art form had better not endlessly require the same mastery of 1930's music in the 21st century as it did in the 1960's... or I'm afraid jazz will become nothing more than a curated museum piece... like (to the greatest degree) classical music has become. If it hasn't already become so.
 


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