Top ten rudiments

dcrigger

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For me, nothing tops the Haskell Hair books (1&2) for walking someone though the process of learning the rudiments - as well as how thy fit together with other rhythm in a musical context. Excellent for beginning reading as well.
 

Pounder

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dcrigger said:
For me, nothing tops the Haskell Hair books (1&2) for walking someone though the process of learning the rudiments - as well as how thy fit together with other rhythm in a musical context. Excellent for beginning reading as well.
Yes this ^^^^

Honestly, The above book was instrumental in my learning to play--not just play rudiments, but play and read drumming. I never had a problem playing in band in Jr High and High School and College. The 26 essential rudiments are taught in these books. There are others, as well. I noticed no Flams or flam rudiments in your list. Also, the long roll is great, but understanding the different length rolls and how they translate to however many beats they cover is important. Many of the rudiments you did not mention I consider of extreme importance. Ruff-based rudiments, flam paradiddles, etc. Rudimental and marching snare drum or practice pad drumming is just a small portion of overall drumming but all of it translates to the drum set.

The other cool thing about working in books like these is the practice of it will create imprints of patterns, syncopation and various rhythms. It definitely should not be considered an end place but just as a window through which one may view the vast area of drumming in music.

And, like Crigger said, how these rudiments fit together is so important! Best of luck on your journey as a drum teacher!
 

scottpep

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Thanks for the input. I fully agree I should have added flams, as almost Every rudiment can be done with flams. Maybe I'll make a V2... For some reason the last few weeks I have been really on a flam tap binge. The thing that is great about doing that is that it is a group of 3 and works on your accents at the same time. or, flam tap tap and your doing 4's even though it sounds like a 3 etc. I do lots of paradiddle flam taps as well.

I was expecting this to be more for people just getting into rudiments to not show all of them as it is too much to take on and you end up spreading yourself thin. Even just learning these ten would help and you could add more after and start flamming. Ruffs are good, and same with all the different rolls, but once again, I find once someone knows how to do a decent double stroke and inverted double stroke, it is easier to learn as now you just need to know when to stop. Not counting and trying to figure out how to hit the drum all at once for multiple lengths.


I could almost break it down into paradiddles, paradiddlediddles, doubles, and 6 stroke rolls and you could get away with a half decent solo and some REALLY good fills. I'll have to redo this video soon anyways because with the hours of practice I put in it sounds sloppy and played bad to me now. haha
 

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Helping drummers get a foundation is great. Not really reinventing the wheel though. Flam paradiddles, very challenging!
 

czarthedrummer

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Very good exercises. Working on rudiments always cleans up my technique and adds words to my drumming vocabulary. I don't have all 40 down yet but my favorite for sure is paradiddlediddles
 

scottpep

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Pounder said:
Helping drummers get a foundation is great. Not really reinventing the wheel though. Flam paradiddles, very challenging!
I wasn't trying to reinvent the wheel. I just cut 40 rudiments to 10 that I ACTUALLY use often in my playing. You can add flams to any one of these and make them even harder as well.

I just know that far too many avoid pad work as it is boring and overwhelming, so rather than learn 40 rudiments to 50%, I always suggest picking 3 of 4 of them and shooting for 100%,
 

cworrick

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Pounder said:
Helping drummers get a foundation is great. Not really reinventing the wheel though. Flam paradiddles, very challenging!
You want a challenge, go for the flam paradiddle diddle.


I agree the Harr books are a great way to learn the 26 rudiments, but with my marching background the PAS 40 (a few extra on top the 26) were a must to learn. Some of them I think even have more use on the drum set (swiss army triplets and triple stroke roll come to mind first). Harr's use of them in a musical setting is also nice.

My favorite to keep on the rudiments is actually the Charlie Wilcox All American Drummer 150 Rudimental Solos. He does a great job of continuing with using the rudiments in a musical manor. He originally opened my mind as to how the rudiments can be rearranged and used musically. With the first 100 short solos, it is a great read to just keep the rudiments and the reading fresh.

The best new thing to come out for the rudiments is Tommy Igoe's "Great hands for a lifetime". Once you know the rudiments, he has a 5 minute rudiment drill you can learn and run through to keep most of the rudiments fresh and in your hands. It is designed for rudiments that have more drum set use than all the marching ones so it doesn't cover ALL the rudiments. Even for those that Hate pad work, 5 minutes is NOTHING just to do a run through and keep things fresh in your hands. Personally, once I learned the routine, I've stretched it to about 6-7 minutes. Part of his 5 minute routine is to play it at a blazingly fast speed. If I miss a couple of days, it is hard to keep up with, so I slow it down a bit.
 

Toast Tee

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6 stroke roll
Singles
Flam taps
Paradiddle'
5 stroke rolls
Double Paradiddles
Drags
To name a few
 

scottpep

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It's funny how after a year I am embarrassed at my playing in this video. Crazy how when you put in the time how different your playing is. But it's also a good way to log improvement. That's a good list Toast. I'd revisit this list now as my playing has changed slightly. This is just a starting point. 5 strokes are something I use quite a bit, but for someone just getting into this stuff I tryed to keep it in groups of 4 or 6. I often play 5 strokes as 16th notes to go over a bar line creating tension. I think I'm going to make a series of videos on each rudiment going down the rabbit hole, applying them to the kit as grooves, fills, displacing and playing in multiple subdivisions. You can spend months on a single rudiment. for example the paradiddles, playing it as triplets, 1/8 notes, 16th notes, 16th note triplets. now try displacing 1 1/8 or 16th note lrrLrllRlrrLrllr or in triplets. lrr Lrl lRl rrL rll Rlr rLr llR

You can start on the and of 1, the e of 1, the "a" of 1. The options are endless. then the orchestration of these is endless.
 

Toast Tee

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I never got to see the vid. Don't be embarrassed, although I have to say I'm my biggest critic.
Form what I gather, you've been playing a year?
How comfortable are you w/your grip, rebound, volume dynamics etc?

This isn't advice for you, just something that helped me understand when my teachers would say "let the stick do the work"
After your grip, and full strokes feel good, and you're ready to get them feeling, and sounding good.
Well, what worked for me....I think of the tip of the stick as one of those super bouncy Crazy balls. I use a combo of wrists, fingers, and momentum to bounce the "ball" in a controlled manner. Once I get one good bounce, I'd go for 2, than 3 etc with each hand.
If you haven't seen the Jim Chapin Moller method video, that will help with everything else.
Finger exercises (like French grip) will help a ton. Try each finger separately in conjunction with all your fingers.
I hope this might help?
 

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