Tribute band...look alike?

wayne

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I wont say which band, but a very close friend to the band, tells me 2 of the members have actually had minor surgery, and "shots" to achieve a more realistic look to the person they are pretending to be. They are a well known band and work a lot, but do you find that a bit creepy, or am I over reacting?
 

Houndog

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Tribute bands seem to be all the rage .
I’m glad I have a day job .
For me music is about creating .
I like playing A few covers , but tribute bands ? I don’t understand the mentality
of folks who are apparently flocking
to these shows .
 

Tornado

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Tribute bands seem to be all the rage .
I’m glad I have a day job .
For me music is about creating .
I like playing A few covers , but tribute bands ? I don’t understand the mentality
of folks who are apparently flocking
to these shows .
Are people actually "flocking" to these shows, or is there just a fraction of venues still booking bands today than there were 20 years ago, and that's all they can safely book and expect some kind of crowd? Genuine question, I've never purposefully gone out to see a full "tribute" act. Not including bands that are "a tribute to the 80's" or "a tribute to rock" or other such regular cover bands that call themselves tributes in order to get booked.
 

repete

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There are plenty of tribute bands that dress the part down here in Florida. I guess I can see the crowd appeal. It’s supposed to be more than a bunch of guys just playing covers. I know an 80’s tribute band that all wear black shirts and pants and skinny ties and I know of a Journey tribute where they wear wigs to look the part. They both do very well down here.
 

On the one

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I heard tribute bands are big in the midwest. I know a drummer in a tribute band and has work all the time all over the country especially in the summer. AXS tv has/had a show on Wednesday nights featuring tribute bands. Some were really good looks, vocals, musicianship, etc. Not my cup of tea but there is a market for it and more as bands retire, quit, break up, the more tribute bands will flourish and become high in demand
 

EvEnStEvEn

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My buddy drums regularly in a Journey tribute. He's a very competent musician, Berklee grad, symphony & orchestra chops, jazz, studio, ect
I've never actually attended his gigs with the "Journey" thing but I've seen him in his longhair wig and 1980s clothes playing the shows on FB and youtube and he looks absolutely ridiculous, as do the other members.

Actually, the only tribute act I've ever seen was RAIN about 30 yrs ago. They were polished pro entertainers but the sole reason I was there was because we opened.

Evidently a bunch of hair metal copiers are playing this month at the Dallas Granada theatre.

Tribute acts don't hold much appeal to me, obvs.
 
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CC Cirillo

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It’s not my skill set, so I really respect the dedication, hard work and craftsmanship it takes to play note-for-note replications of a historic band’s music. A lot of these drummers in tribute bands are doing an awesome job!

But to actually hold my interest, there has to be something resembling originality from the musicians on stage. And that can be as simple as a cover band veering away from the original with a different tempo or feel, or a guy singing Jolene or a woman singing Whole Lotta Rosie.

If you want to play the entirety of Rumours or OK Computer or Enter the Wu-Tang or Cher’s Greatest Hits, please do it and if you put your fingerprints all over it , I’m interested.

Exact replica gear and wigs and costumes and makeup and aping the original artists mannerisms is all good fun but not my thing.

If I understand the OP that people are actually having minor surgery over this???? I’d hate to think that is true. Please don’t do that. We love you just the way you are.

That said: How do I get Clem Burke’s hair?
 

thin shell

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I have seen a couple of Beatles cover bands. One has it down to a science of matching gear, clothing, wigs and all of the mannerisms. The other one was not as serious about having the matching gear but had the wigs and looked the part. The second one did the entire Sgt Peppers album along with other songs and played with our local symphony orchestra. Both bands are great and play everything very accurately and I have enjoyed every show I have seen.

There have been personnel changes in the first band over the year and I had heard rumors about plastic surgery with some of the former members but don't know if it was true.

My family went to see Black Jacket Symphony with Marc Martel doing the entire A Night at the Symphony album and it was one of the best shows I have ever seen. It was as close to seeing Queen as you could get and they did a great job. No costumes or look, they just play the music close to note for note.

I don't get the hate people, or at least drummers on the internet have for these types of shows.

If the band is put together tight and it is music you like it is going to be a great show.

I have seen videos of other tribute bands of other bands like Rush, Genesis, Heart and Led Zeppelin. Those have varied more as far as accuracy of look, gear and acting and accuracy of the music. Often the drummers seem to be the weak link. Especially the Rush tributes.

I find drummers to be a pretty undisciplined lot. With most bands, be it commercial acts, cover bands or whatever, the guitar players and bass players are playing the correct notes and playing the correct melodies. The singers are singing the same words. Obviously there is some variation for improvisation, changing the words for the locale or a joke but they tend to play the song pretty close. Then you have the drummers. More times and not they are not even trying to play it the way it was recorded. Personally I don't get that. It always makes me think of some of the old drummer jokes. "Our band has three musicians and a drummer".

I have seen some videos of drummers showing their chops. They have technique for days and can solo really well but then you see them playing in a band and they are terrible.

Considering there are virtually no good new rock bands and most of the older ones are retiring or dying out, I will gladly pay to see a really good tribute or accurate cover band. They are often the only chance to hear those songs played live by people who really love those songs.
 
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TPC

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Getting paid to perform live music is a tough road these days, so if a band can't make it work by playing in a tribute band, more power to them.

I've seen some that bore me to tears and others that were inspiring.

My good friend and alto sax player in my original (and rather weird) jazz group makes a little coin by playing a bunch of different instruments and singing backup in a Bowie cover band (Jean Genies). They are stellar. They play deep-cut selections from every era and play them fantastically. Not exactly note for note, but definitely true to the style of the bands from the era. When I saw them last time, what really struck me was how impressive the songs really were. I enjoyed the show very much.
 

TheBeachBoy

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I've seen one of the Beatles tribute bands, I think it was Beatlemania Live. Up close they definitely had surgery to look more like the Beatles. There was (maybe still is) a show called Showstoppers Live that would play at a local casino. It was a variety of artists tributes, with Madonna, Michael Jackson, Blues Brothers, Elvis, et al. Some of them would do a meet & greet after the show and you could tell a few of them had surgery as well.

There's a Sean Connery impersonator who lives in our neighborhood who occasionally comes out to our gigs on Sundays to hang out. I don't think he's had anything done, but he has the voice/accent down and he really does look like Connery, at least close enough. There's enough difference that I don't think he's had anything done.

Personally, the tribute band thing is kind of fun to watch sometimes, but I wouldn't want to play in one, especially if it meant surgery. Nope.
 

blikum

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Tribute bands are my bread and butter. And no, I don't go to great length's to look like the artist, but I do try and get the gear and the performance as close as I can. As far as going to see a tribute band, no thanks.
 

mgdrummer

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I'd never go that far as to surgically alter my physical appearance to "become" someone else. That's creepy...

As far as tribute bands go, it's a GIG! It's a JOB! I understand the desire to put your personality and passion into creating original music, and there are times/places for that. I was pretty against even playing in cover bands when I was in my 20's when I felt I had something to prove. As I got older I realized I had a unique skill set that I could use to entertain people and earn a paycheck. It gets me out of the house and onto a stage and I keep my chops up playing at least once a week, sometimes up to 3-4 times a week during festival season. The income helps support my family. Since my 20's I've played in tributes to Queensryche, Styx, Toby Keith and Kenny Chesney, and I've recently been asked to be involved with a Deep Purple tribute. I look at it as a challenge to get the parts as close as I can to either the records or live renditions of the songs (sometimes a blend of the two). It takes a special skill set to be disciplined to reproduce the parts gig after gig, especially when your tendency is to want to do things your own way.

A good friend of mine is in a touring Eagles tribute act. They pay royalties to the Eagles and they perform the music spot on to the records. The guitar tones, the vocal harmonies, etc. The drummer even sorta kinda looks like Don Henley and sings and plays his parts to a T. When we talk about the gigs they play (festivals & theaters), he talks about how they are selling the experience, the memories associated with this music. These bands are either no longer touring, or if they are there's a good chance there are replacement members, or they're charging HUGE money for tickets. They've found that there is a market for people who want to relive the memories/experience who are willing to pay $20-$30 a ticket to see and hear the music recreated by a band capable of doing so. For them it's great, they don't have to deal with the bars/clubs complaining about the draw, playing till 2am, etc. and they're treated (and compensated) very, very well.
 

Vistalite Black

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I'll say this. Music is more closely tied to memory than anything other than smell. Certain songs can come on the radio, and I remember where I was and who I was with when I heard the same song 30 or even 40 years before.

For the snobs declaring that they'd never have fun in this way... Earlier, I said I saw the ZOSO tribute band play note-perfect renditions of LZ tunes in a tiny club. Of course, it's not the same, it's amazing to hear those songs and think, this is almost exactly what it must have been like to see them in 1970 or whatever.

I'm also a life-long Thin Lizzy fan. I own more than 50 bootlegs. There was a time in my 20s when Thin Lizzy accounted for, probably, half of what I listened to. Unfortunately, Thin Lizzy last toured the U.S. in 1980 and leader Phil Lynott died six years later.

A version of Thin Lizzy did perform near me with Judas Priest in 2011 with only Scott Gorham and Brian Downey left from the original lineup. It was, of course, not the same, but for someone who had wished to see Lizzy for decades, it was amazing, and I'd go back and see them again (even though the great Brian Downey is no longer playing with them).

I imagine it's a little like getting together with your high school girlfriend after 35 years -- not as great, but probably still worth the experience.
 

Nacci

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It is definitely creepy. You should advise your friend to slap them. Then, when they whimper “What was that for?”. He will say, you know what it was for you little B****.

I would pay an admission cover for that.
 

pwc1141

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This town has seen some tribute soloists and some tribute bands. My issue is that I never liked the original singers or bands that much so why should I watch a copy of them .......
 

mesazoo

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I don't like most tribute acts. One exception would be what Dweezil Zappa is doing. More of an homage to the music.
 

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