Trouble playing Flams at slow tempos

Danny97

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Hi everyone,

I’ve been practicing my flams getting them down. my way of practicing is, I’ll start with flams For 4 then flam taps then Finally Swiss Army triplets, Then I will keep cycling through it. I’ve started the metronome at a very slow speed 45BPM as I know playing at that speed is very Challenging and Beneficial. My question is as I’m repeating the Sequence over and over again I always mess up the Swiss army triplet about minute in. I dunno if it’s because I’ve set the metronome so slow I’m concentrating more on each stroke. If anyone’s had the same issues in the past would be helpful if someone could point me in the right Direction cheers dan
 

multijd

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Work on each rudiment slowly and independently first. Work on them slow-fast-slow. Also work on them at a consistent tempo. As you feel comfortable at that tempo increase the tempo. Work on Charles Wilcoxon “The All American Drummer”. This will help combine them.
 

kdgrissom

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Dan,

One of the first things to achieve in playing Flams is preventing the little stroke from inadvertently rising with the big stroke. So you must watch what your wrists are doing. By practicing slowly, you will eventually be able to add flams to other patterns with relative ease.
Do your best to execute a RH Flam and freeze into the LH position immediately while keeping your muscles relaxed then execute the LH Flam. Keep your stick heights consistent between hand-to-hand flams and remember that the grace (or ornamental) stroke should be softer than the fundamental stroke.
 

Seb77

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Changing between rudiments can be quite tricky.
The flam tap has groups of three consecutive strokes , whereas the swiss triplet only has two. Practise real slowly and focus on the transition.
Here's a little 6/8 or 3/4 exercise of these two:
lR R rL L lR R rL L R rL L R
rL L lR R rL L lR R L lR R L
 

Danny97

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Dan,

One of the first things to achieve in playing Flams is preventing the little stroke from inadvertently rising with the big stroke. So you must watch what your wrists are doing. By practicing slowly, you will eventually be able to add flams to other patterns with relative ease.
Do your best to execute a RH Flam and freeze into the LH position immediately while keeping your muscles relaxed then execute the LH Flam. Keep your stick heights consistent between hand-to-hand flams and remember that the grace (or ornamental) stroke should be softer than the fundamental stroke.
Okay, thank you, I’ll let you know how I get On.
 

Danny97

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Work on each rudiment slowly and independently first. Work on them slow-fast-slow. Also work on them at a consistent tempo. As you feel comfortable at that tempo increase the tempo. Work on Charles Wilcoxon “The All American Drummer”. This will help combine them.
Thanks for the answer. When you say “move the tempo up when comfortable” Is that after coupled minutes without mistakes or like 8 times over then move up the metronome 5bpm?
 

Danny97

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Dan,

One of the first things to achieve in playing Flams is preventing the little stroke from inadvertently rising with the big stroke. So you must watch what your wrists are doing. By practicing slowly, you will eventually be able to add flams to other patterns with relative ease.
Do your best to execute a RH Flam and freeze into the LH position immediately while keeping your muscles relaxed then execute the LH Flam. Keep your stick heights consistent between hand-to-hand flams and remember that the grace (or ornamental) stroke should be softer than the fundamental stroke.
Thank you I’ll give this a go and keep practicing it this week and tell you how I get on.
 

pgm554

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A Swiss triplet should be like a dirty roll.
More bounce than an articulated flam .
Try going between flam drags and swiss triplets instead of flam taps.
 

Tornado

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A Swiss triplet should be like a dirty roll.
More bounce than an articulated flam .
Try going between flam drags and swiss triplets instead of flam taps.
I do think that's the most practical application of the rudiment at speed, especially around a drum kit, but I think there's still a case for being able to play it with a clean flam.
 

multijd

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Thanks for the answer. When you say “move the tempo up when comfortable” Is that after coupled minutes without mistakes or like 8 times over then move up the metronome 5bpm?
When you can control consistently thats when you should try it at a faster tempo.
 

pgm554

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Tony Williams would disagree.
Going around the set ,a double stop would be a bit more useful in that you don't have to worry about a flam being too flat when you are on different surfaces.
In a rudimental setting you're not going to get a speedy swiss without rebound.
Just the nature of the beast.
 

gwbasley

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You could be having a metronome issue. Here is something that my teacher used to do, and I never fully realized it at the time, but it was a bit of a trick that was later revealed.

He turned on the click a minute or two before you sat down to play the assigned lesson. When you started playing you were already at one with the time. There were times when he would set it faster than you would have thought you could play it, but once the groove set in it was no longer a challenge.

I currently teach at a music school and often run into the beginner who has a time issue and I use my teachers method. I tell them to turn on their metronome, put down their sticks and just relax for 2 or 3 minutes. I have had very good results with this and it could be something that works for you.
 

Danny97

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You could be having a metronome issue. Here is something that my teacher used to do, and I never fully realized it at the time, but it was a bit of a trick that was later revealed.

He turned on the click a minute or two before you sat down to play the assigned lesson. When you started playing you were already at one with the time. There were times when he would set it faster than you would have thought you could play it, but once the groove set in it was no longer a challenge.

I currently teach at a music school and often run into the beginner who has a time issue and I use my teachers method. I tell them to turn on their metronome, put down their sticks and just relax for 2 or 3 minutes. I have had very good results with this and it could be something that works for you.
I gave this ago tonight with different flams and it definitely helped me. I started to relax with the click after a Few minutes. thanks for the pointers and tips definitely gonna use this more in my practice.
 


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