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Tru Oil finish- share your stories?

patrickmplaysdrums

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I am getting ready to start another snare build- a 13" walnut stave shell- and have seen some incredible projects (mostly furniture and guitars) using tru-oil as the topcoat and I would be interested to see or hear your experience if you have any. Good, bad, fantastic, ugly...im open to it all. If you did apply the oil, feel free to expand on the process of doing so- maybe even throw in some pictures.

CHEERS!!
 

Santino

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I can only hope the shell i ordered comes with the figure of that stock LOL. regardless, that vid is super helpful! thanks
Using Tru Oil is a labor of love. It takes time and patience. Most I've gone is 18 coats on an old Winchester Shotgun Stock. She's a beaut and it was worth the month it took me.
 

Lamontsdad

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Tru Oil is never completely finished, but it is super-forgiving. Be careful with steel wool as I have seen it trapped and rusting on lighter woods. That is why I say wet sand.
 
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Geardaddy

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I had to laugh when I saw the title of this thread. I'm very familiar with Tru-Oil because about 30 years ago I worked as a chemist for the company that invented it. At that time Birchwood Casey was one of two divisions of a company called Birchwood Laboratories. Birchwood Casey made gun care products and the other division made Medical products such as Tucks Hemorrhoid pads. I was told that the company was originally started in the late 1940's by two doctors (Proctologists) that were also avid hunters. Thus the two rather different divisions of the company under one roof. At the time I worked there Tru-Oil was being made in 55 gallon drums and filled by hand in a small room in the factory. I used it on a number of projects back the since I could get it for free and it was then and still is now a very good product.
 

varatrodder

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While it's not exactly the same as Tru Oil, I use Tried and True products a lot and really like them. Their varnish oil is similar to Tru Oil in that it is linseed oil with resins added, but it's completely non-toxic and food safe.

 

Michael C

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I have done rifle stocks with TruOil. Honestly, for a drum… I think it’s alot of labor for not much results. I would spray poly and do a few coats with sanding in between. It will be a harder finish. Rifles work with tru oil because they get nicked up and scratched up and it’s easy to repair. Not it’s not super hard in my experience. I final fit and finished some French walnut grips on a Ruger Bisley with rattle can spray poly. 6 coats, sanded in between and they came out fantastic. A harder finish than the oil in my opinion.
 

Michael C

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Poly finished walnut stocks
 

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