Trying to learn about cymbals- what is the difference in the same cymbal in different

Tigerdrummer

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sizes. A ride or crash for instance. 22 inch ride versus same ride in 20 inch or 18 inch crash versus 16 inch. Trying to learn more. And you guys always have great insights form your experience
 

Mcjnic

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Here is a cool set of vintage cats from one of the makers.
If you check them out and read them, they actually have some cool basic info on the differences you are seeking. Plus, they are just really neat to look at.
I would suggest starting with the black one ... 198? ... its a really good one.
Enjoy!

 

K.O.

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When dealing with cast B20 cymbals no two will sound exactly the same, even if they are the same size and model. That is an important thing to remember and why it is always best to hear a cymbal you are buying in person if at all possible.

Generally there will be differences in the overall weights, thickness, and profile of different cymbal models but generally a given model falls into a range of weights. They will sound similar to a degree but not identical.

So it's even more complicated than just whether a 16 sounds better than an 18, or vice-versa since they all sound a bit different. I recall buying my first new A. Zildjian many years ago. I wanted an 18" crash, at that time there weren't nearly as many models as there are now but I was looking for a medium thin crash. The store I went to (Franks Drum Shop in downtown Chicago...long out of business now) had about a dozen 18" medium thin crashes in stock, I tried them all, only liked 2 or 3 of them and eventually picked out what I thought was the best overall. Today you'd be very hard pressed to find any store with that sort of stock on hand to weed through but my point is that there is a lot of variation so hearing what you are buying is essential.

I'm not sure that answers your question but I'm sure others will offer further insight.

If possible hear before you buy

Don't get too bogged down by the ink on a cymbal, if you think a cymbal sounds like a great crash but it says "ride" on it then so what, crash away.

High quality cymbals don't go bad unless abused in some way so used cymbals represent a good way to buy various cymbals at a lower cost to figure out what appeals to you.
 

RIDDIM

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Have you checked out mycymbal.com? If not, please do.
 

Tigerdrummer

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Have you checked out mycymbal.com? If not, please do.
I have not but now I will. Thank you. I've been trying to learn drums for a couple of years and there is so much you dont know that you dont know. It has dawned on me recently I've done only a minimal amount about learning cymbals. My gear mostly belonged to my late brother so I didnt really do research on it before buying. Its nice Zildjians A's and K's and Yamaha drums and I'm just playing at home but I want to know more about the stuff. People like you who share their thoughts have been very helpful in this process.
 

ThomFloor

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Pitch of anything generally correlates with size.
Bigger = lower pitch
Bigger = more sustain
In cymbals, weight is a factor too. For the same cymbal diameter, thicker = higher pitch.
 

multijd

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Pitch of anything generally correlates with size.
Bigger = lower pitch
Bigger = more sustain
In cymbals, weight is a factor too. For the same cymbal diameter, thicker = higher pitch.
Agree with this! So a 16” crash should be higher in pitch than an 18”. If the 18” is considerably thicker and the 16” very thin it is possible that the 18” could be higher in pitch. Either way the 18” will be louder and sustain/ring longer.
 

Seb77

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With large ride cymbals the overall mass makes the cymbal react more slowly and less easily, so the crash sound (which you can get from many but not all rides) will be slower/more swelling; you also need to hit harder to get to the higher sound, to let the cymbal open up. At the same time the wash (undercurrent sound) will be more even when you hit softer or harder, or slower/faster. I think that‘s the main reasons smaller rides never caught on (rides having less taper than crashes of the same size).
 

JDA

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Crash Cymbals are tapered thin to edge to open fast and quickly disperse. Ride cymbals retain taper thickness to edge more to Sustain and hold onto a beat
 

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