Trying to understand sounds as cars go by...

Tornado

DFO Veteran
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2017
Messages
2,849
Reaction score
2,866
Location
Dallas
Maybe you've heard this too: this rap-hop hip-dip stuff...lately, what I hear is drum machines programmed by people who cannot be drummers! This random thumping, like the ultimate devolution of music...which makes me say again: what's the matter with people?
Oh boy, here we go. I'll share what happened to me one day when I went shopping for shoes and walked into a Foot Locker store:

What the Hell are these shoes? Who on Earth would wear that? These aren't for me. I am clearly not the target demographic for this store. I'm not supposed to be here.
That day, I realized my place in this world as a middle aged white man. That place is inside the New Balance store.
 

Squirrel Man

Very well Known Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2020
Messages
838
Reaction score
909
I don't bemoan folks who like what they like. I like a lot of off the wall and stupid poopy, it's what gets me going, gets my blood pumping and fingers tapping and even singing after an adult beverage or three and I know I'm not different from people who do the same thing but from a different angle. I respect that.

If metal does that for you or rap or jazz, that's your thing, soak it up. Hip hop, teeny bop, whatever, life is short, live it and enjoy.

What I don't appreciate is the sometimes inconsideration of blasting it to the point that it's obnoxious - like forcing it on my ears is the point as what I think the OP is suggesting. Wearing it on one's sleeve like (oh no..) politics and religion - keep it to yourself and we'll be fine, otherwise.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Pibroch

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 10, 2018
Messages
223
Reaction score
158
Location
Australia
"This random thumping, like the ultimate devolution of music" haha
Love to find me some music with programmed random thumps. Most of the "drum machine" stuff I listen to has very simply structured bass drum - like 4 on the floor.
 

Stickclick

Very well Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2018
Messages
738
Reaction score
323
Location
Florida, USA
That's how some computer generated drum tracks are now. I don't think they can be played in real time by a human drummer. I like some of it though.
 

Hypercaffium

Active Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2020
Messages
28
Reaction score
36
Location
Rome, Italy
Let me say that I usually don't like contemporary rap/trap music, but I often like the beats, backing tracks and production. A lot of those programmed drum machines are very intricate and not easy to play, at least for me.
That said, I understand what the OP is trying to say. Devolution of music is happening, imho.
 

dtk

DFO Star
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 6, 2005
Messages
9,002
Reaction score
682
Location
Northbridge MA
non drummers creating drum parts can create good parts that we would never think of because we are incummbered by certain rules.
I really like this British Rapper, Roots Manuva...some of his stuff (not so much the drums)...is just not I'd expect to hear (I once described it as the sound my stomach makes after too much beer)....but I love his voice (fun fact...he did a track with Ozomatli's Charli 2 na...whose drummer Mario used to grace us with his presence)

 

Vistalite Black

Ludwigs in the Basement
Platinum Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2015
Messages
4,145
Reaction score
2,047
Location
North Carolina
Good thing we're not all required to like things we don't like!

Los Angeles Times, Feb. 11, 1964
"With their bizarre shrubbery, the Beatles are obviously a press agent’s dream combo. Not even their mothers would claim that they sing well. But the hirsute thickets they affect make them rememberable, and they project a certain kittenish charm which drives the immature, shall we say, ape."

Boston Globe, William F. Buckley Jr., Sept. 14, 1964
"The Beatles are not merely awful; I would consider it sacrilegious to say anything less than that they are god awful. They are so unbelievably horribly, so appallingly unmusical, so dogmatically insensitive to the magic of the art that they qualify as crowned heads of anti-music, even as the imposter popes went down in history as “anti-popes.”

The PMRC's "Filthy 15" Records, 1984
“Eat Me Alive” by Judas Priest, “B$^stard” by Motley Crue, “Darling Nikki” by Prince, “Sugar Wall” by Sheena Easton, “Animal” by W.A.S.P., “Into the Coven” by Mercyful Fate, “Strap on Robby Baby” by Vanity, “High N’ Dry” by Def Leppard, “We’re Not Gonna Take It” by Twisted Sister, “Dress You Up” by Madonna, “She Bop” by Cyndi Lauper, “Let Me Put My Love Into You” by AC/DC, “Trashed” by Black Sabbath, “My House” by Mary Jane Girls, and “Possessed” by Venom.
 

bassanddrum84

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2009
Messages
399
Reaction score
281
Is it the de-evolution of music or live music? Because music is still going strong. Maybe not mainstream. I came from a era where we threw shows for original bands at vfws, banquet halls, Rex centers with 5-10 bands a night. a lot of which we got while they were touring. It’s still going on around me about hr or so away. It’s not as mainstream as it once was. I listen to rap, rock, jazz, blues, country and everything else in between.

I use to say anyone can make a rap song but no not anyone can make a rap song. It’s a lot harder then you think. Specially ones that are big hits.

People are far more open minded to all kinds of genres of music now a days. It’s changed the way music is brought to people. A lot more artist are realizing one song here one song there. Or a album and then two months another album. The general public doesn’t always listen to albums front to back anymore. It’s more of single songs and build there playlist of all kinds of stuff. It’s a good and band thing.

I loved listening to a album front to back and still do. But It has also opened up doors for artist to gain new fans they normally wouldn’t. There’s rappers playing warp tour when that was still a thing and actual bands playing on rap tours they both had to win over the audience. Lil Wayne went on tour with blink. Bringing crowds that normally wouldn’t be together together so it’s good thing.

You have to adapt to what’s changing. The days I had making a album and cramming into a van or rv and touring just aren’t there anymore it’s all virtual which has its pros as well reaching a vast community faster. We can now record records in our own home compared to shelling out a lot to go to a studio.

Believe me I hated the way music was going but at some point you have to change and adapt. Social media made it easier to share music with so many people. And there’s a lot of good music out there. Just because it isn’t on the billboard or radio doesn’t mean it’s not happening. I’ve discovered so many cool bands from YouTube alone and Spotify.
 
Last edited:

Houndog

DFO Master
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
3,380
Reaction score
2,823
Location
Oklahoma City
Is it the de-evolution of music or live music? Because music is still going strong. Maybe not mainstream. I came from a era where we threw shows for original bands at vfws, banquet halls, Rex centers with 5-10 bands a night a lot of which we got while they were touring. It’s still going on around me about hr or so away. It’s not as mainstream as it once was. I listen to rap rock jazz blues country and everything else in between. I use to say anyone can make a rap song but no not anyone can make a rap song. It’s a lot harder then you think. Specially ones that are big hits. People are far more open minded to all kinds of genres of music now a days. It’s changed the way music is brought to people. A lot more artist are realizing one song here one song there. Or a album and then two months another album. The general public doesn’t always listen to albums front to back anymore. It’s more of single songs and build there playlist of all kinds of stuff. It’s a good and band thing. I loved listening to a album front to back and still do. But It has also opened up doors for artist to gain new fans they normally wouldn’t. There’s rappers playing warp tour when that was still a thing and actual bands playing on rap tours they both had to win over the audience. Lil Wayne went on tour with blink. Bringing crowds that normally wouldn’t be together together so it’s good and a bad thing. You have to adapt to what’s changing. The days I had making a album and cramming into a van or rv and touring just aren’t there anymore it’s all virtual which has its pros as well reaching a vast community faster. We can now record records in our own home compared to shelling out a lot to go to a studio. Believe me I hated the way music was going but at some point you have to change and adapt. Social media made it easier to share music with so many people. And there’s a lot of good music out there. Just because it isn’t on the billboard or radio doesn’t mean it’s not happening. I’ve discovered so many cool bands from YouTube alone and Spotify.
Do you realize how hard that is to actually read ?
“ paragraphs “ please .
 

bassanddrum84

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2009
Messages
399
Reaction score
281
Do you realize how hard that is to actually read ?
“ paragraphs “ please .
ya I’ll edit it I get in a hurry specially when I have two little babies climbing up on me. Punctuation isn’t always at par when I have little ones.
 

michaelocalypse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2018
Messages
159
Reaction score
68
Location
South Florida
It used to annoy me until I sat down and listened to it. Not by choice. I usually don't have options around here, and it was preferable to hear than the brain dead conversation that was going on.

I found it to be an interesting perspective of what non-drummers hear when drummers play. We typically have an organized, methodical, mechanical way that we arrange the different sounds. A lot of this is attached to sound sources, and the limitations of 4 limbs being able to smack said sound sources.

Non-drummers don't have those limitations. There are no sound sources to attach the sounds to. They know the sounds exist, and that's all that matters. They don't care if someone physically plays a sound source, or plays a programmed track. They just want to hear a combination of sounds, and it doesn't matter if that's 3 different conflicting hi-hat sounds, or four different bass drum sounds/patterns. Terry Bozzio's monster set doesn't seem so crazy now, does it?

It's all still arranged in a musical time structure (usually 4/4) and looped. But a group of seven 16th note hi-hats played on the "ee" of 3 every 2 bars sounds like ear candy accents to most people, where we're wondering what the person who wrote it is smoking because it makes no sense musically to anything else that's going on. To them, it is the focus of what's going on because it ends about the same time the lyrics do. And the whole "beat" is a collection of sounds like that, from various instruments and synths.
 


Top