Tulipwood

Angelo Zollo

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I was looking online for some drum parts and a company was offering ( their words ) a hard wood shell similar to maple. Have you guys ever heard of tulipwood?
 

MrDrums2112

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Yes. Fantastic wood for snares - Noble & Cooley makes a solid shell snare, and they are naw making tulipwood kits (Union series). Great tone wood, similar to maple in that I find it bright and lively. A very "wide" tone.
 

lossforgain

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+1 on the N&C tulipwood. I had a chance to play one of those and thought it sounded and felt fantastic. I would love to find a source for Gary at Summit to make me one.
 

Angelo Zollo

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Yes. Fantastic wood for snares - Noble & Cooley makes a solid shell snare, and they are naw making tulipwood kits (Union series). Great tone wood, similar to maple in that I find it bright and lively. A very "wide" tone.
What about for a floor Tom 16x16
 

frankmott

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I'm pretty sure "tulip wood" is the same as "tulip tree" which is a North American variety of the very common poplar. It's a fast growing hardwood, and is therefore very affordable. Many low-end drums are made from it. If you buy into the whole species/sonic-characteristics marketing voodoo, it's very similar to maple. Any actual difference in sound can easily be overcome by head and hoop selection.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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Tulipwood is a great wood for drums . Noble and Cooley has been making snare drums out of this wood for a few years now and as previously stated their new Union series drums are made from Tulipwood . Tulipwood is warmer than maple with a thicker attack and enhanced low end. It is not as articulate as maple or walnut but it has wonderful sonic properties . There are quite a few YouTube Videos posted on Tulipwood snares and kits .
 

JimmySticks

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I'm pretty sure "tulip wood" is the same as "tulip tree" which is a North American variety of the very common poplar. It's a fast growing hardwood, and is therefore very affordable. Many low-end drums are made from it. If you buy into the whole species/sonic-characteristics marketing voodoo, it's very similar to maple. Any actual difference in sound can easily be overcome by head and hoop selection.
So if it's very similar to maple, what's the draw? Why buy tulipwood?

I'm just asking, not putting it down, because I've heard that N&C tulipwood Union kit and it sounded pretty darned good.
 

clowndog

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I'm pretty sure "tulip wood" is the same as "tulip tree" which is a North American variety of the very common poplar. It's a fast growing hardwood, and is therefore very affordable. Many low-end drums are made from it. If you buy into the whole species/sonic-characteristics marketing voodoo, it's very similar to maple. Any actual difference in sound can easily be overcome by head and hoop selection.
Tulipwood trees grow exclusively in North America and are widely distributed throughout most of the eastern United States in mixed hardwood forests. It is a single species and is not a poplar (Populus) being a Magnoliacae producing wood that is superior to the many poplar species.
 

cribbon

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I think the British Drum Company uses it in some of their drums, maybe the Imp?
 

frankmott

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Tulipwood trees grow exclusively in North America and are widely distributed throughout most of the eastern United States in mixed hardwood forests. It is a single species and is not a poplar (Populus) being a Magnoliacae producing wood that is superior to the many poplar species.
From Wikipedia:
These trees are widely known by the common name tulip tree or tuliptree for their large flowers superficially resembling tulips. It is sometimes referred to as tulip poplar or yellow poplar, and the wood simply as "poplar", although not closely related to the true poplars. Other common names include canoewood, saddle-leaf tree, and white wood.

I always though Tulip trees were another name for, or a variety of Poplar. I stand corrected, thanks.
 

b/o 402

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Right. Tulip poplar is generally marketed in the US as “poplar” although as noted above it is not true poplar at all. You can find it in Home Depot and lumber dealers around here as simply Poplar. It is a relatively light weight hardwood, white with green and gray streaks.
 

drumsforme

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Natal Cafe Racer is a great sounding All Tulip Wood Drum kit. I believe it came out in 2017. A fellow gigging drummer has one and absolutely loves it. I believe a 4 pc. shell pack sells for less than $1500
Take a listen.....

 

Tornado

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Right. Tulip poplar is generally marketed in the US as “poplar” although as noted above it is not true poplar at all. You can find it in Home Depot and lumber dealers around here as simply Poplar. It is a relatively light weight hardwood, white with green and gray streaks.
So does that mean that American drums marketed as poplar are really Tulip?
 

drummer5359

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The tulip wood snares and kits that Noble & Cooley are currently making sound great.

The snare drums that N & C made for the Union army during the civil war were commonly made of tulip wood. Although tulip wood drums have not been a common option for a while, they are not a "new" idea. Noble & Cooley named their line of tulip wood multi ply kits "Union" in reference to their common use one hundred and sixty years ago.
 

latzanimal

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I prefer Brazillian Tulipwood. It smells like tulips when cut and the pieces when dropped have a musical tone, like a marimba bar.... The wood looks like Vanilla ice cream with red and purple swirls before it patinas out to the orangish/brown color you see here. There is nothing soft about it and is not cheap.

IMG_0140_web.jpg
 


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