Two recent favorite throw-offs

mtarrani

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I only recently "discovered" two of my now-favorite throw offs: the DW Mag (which came on two recently purchased PDP Concept snare drums), and the Gretsch Lightning (which came on the snare that shipped with my new Brooklyn kit). Both are absolutely a joy for me because they are unobtrusive, easily engage/disengage, and easy to adjust tension.

My playing style includes dropping snares on songs in a minor key, ballads when using brushes, and Afro-Cuban and Brazilian grooves. That means that in any one hour set I probably disengage snares at least four times. These two throws are ... intuitive and unobtrusive are two words that spring to mind. I have other favorite throws, but these two just moved to the top of my list. I wish I had discovered them sooner.
 

pwc1141

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I switched to a standard Trick throw off on my Brady snare but had the Trick 3 position one on another snare that I sold. I should have swopped the throw-offs before selling that drum as I really liked the options in the 3 position version on the Trick throw-off. I haven't experienced the two you mention but glad you are happy with them.
 

Drumbumcrumb

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Funny how one man’s trash is another’s treasure! I absolutely detest the Lightning throw lol. I don’t enjoy snare wire changes on it at all, and the whole sloppy/floppy deal turns me right off.

As far as simple, unobtrusive throws go - the G. Way beertap is about as simple and unobtrusive as you can get and that is a throw that I LOVE. Another contender is the lovely P88 (I’m also learning to love the P83, which is, to me, far superior to the p85). The P88 combines simplicity with a very classy aesthetic and the click detents are a really nice touch. The curved lever, the ‘crown’ knob… sublime. The universal version is ingenious and a cinch to retrofit on loads of beaded shells.

Simplicity itself!:
774D4464-52CE-4237-8458-4477987B9547.jpeg
 

mtarrani

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Funny how one man’s trash is another’s treasure! I absolutely detest the Lightning throw lol. I don’t enjoy snare wire changes on it at all, and the whole sloppy/floppy deal turns me right off.

As far as simple, unobtrusive throws go - the G. Way beertap is about as simple and unobtrusive as you can get and that is a throw that I LOVE. Another contender is the lovely P88 (I’m also learning to love the P83, which is, to me, far superior to the p85). The P88 combines simplicity with a very classy aesthetic and the click detents are a really nice touch. The curved lever, the ‘crown’ knob… sublime. The universal version is ingenious and a cinch to retrofit on loads of beaded shells.

Simplicity itself!:
View attachment 534091
I have the modern Lightning. I have heard horror stories about the older model(s). The Way throw looks like one I would like.
 

sternerp

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I switched to a standard Trick throw off on my Brady snare but had the Trick 3 position one on another snare that I sold. I should have swopped the throw-offs before selling that drum as I really liked the options in the 3 position version on the Trick throw-off. I haven't experienced the two you mention but glad you are happy with them.
I have installed Trick 3-position throw offs on my 1960’s Slingerland COB and Ludwig Supraphonic, using adapters so the original holes can be used. They’re pricey at around $120, including adapters, but worth it to me. They’re beautifully machined and function much better than the original strainers they replaced.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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There are quite few great options nowadays when it comes to strainers . Some of the models I have personal experience with are :
Sonor Dualglide - my all time favourite strainer - smooth , well engineered and you can flip it beck on with your knee .

Noble and Cooley - a very simple strainer that works as advertised and really holds the snare tension well .

INDe strainer - this is the strainer I get when I commission a boutique builder to make me a snare . It is a fantastic strainer.

Gretsch Microsensitive - the newer model works really well - the strainer locks and unlocks with the push of the button in the top of the arm .

Trick three point strainer - I like the strainer functionally but I don’t like the sheer bulk of the strainer .

Tama linear glide strainer - another truly superb strainer . I have really come to appreciate how great this strainer is since I got the Peter Erskine snare .
 

MrDrums2112

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I'll second the N&C strainer. Simple, quiet, super reliable. The Trick 3 position strainer is great as well, but you have to like the look of it (and I do).

Going back to vintage drums, the old SLingerland 3-point strainers are, while I would not say "simple", are some of my favorites. I've got a drum from the 1930s with a 3-point strainer that still works flawlessly.
 

Browny

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My Metro jarrah stave has the Trick GS007 'multi step' strainer which I like. It works well, the adjustment knob is stepped and the tension doesn't back out. Probably 12 years old now and still going strong. No complaints at all.

I just swapped out the P85 on my 6.5" Acro reissue for the Inde strainer and universal butt and so far I'm really liking that, huge upgrade on the P85 and P32 combo. Stepped knob, still early days but I don't think it's backing off at all, good action and I like that it's a sleek design and doesn't sit as proud as the Trick.
 

Soulfinger

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Funny - I too switch the snares on and off all the time, sometimes several times within a song. And I much prefer the handling of strainers where the lever moves alongside the shell to "Gladstone-type" levers that move away from the shell. I had both the Lightning and the MAG and found them too cumbersome. It also bugs me that you have to engage the snares when you store the drum in a gig bag.

The Tama Linear Drive mentioned above is my favourite. Smooth, quiet, precise - simply excellent.
 

Markkuliini

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Here's my take...

Gretsch Lightning:
Someone likes these?
Well good for them. :)
Biggest problem
is that the lever and snare adjustment are on the opposite ends. And I need to have an easy access to both while playing.
Also, wire change is not very easy.
And the lever feels bit loose sideways, even though it's a new drum, so I'm not expecting it to last or function well decades.
1/5

(Modern) Gretsch Micro-Sensitive:
Looks really cool, works pretty well. Have had it only on over drum, but it works flawlessly on that one. Was holding tension well and you could adjust while playing although it wasn't as fast as with let's say on Trick.
Relatively easy to change wires.
3,5/5

Noble&Cooley:
Simple, and the lever and the adjustment knob are on the same side which is nice...except the knob is quite stiff to turn on all my N&C's and it's almost impossible to adjust the snare tension while the snares are off. Bummer.
Maybe I need to lubricate it more, but it's been the same issue no matter if the drum is new or vintage.
Probably my least favorite strainer when it comes on changing wires. You need a flat head screwdriver and fingers of a surgeon.
3/5 if you never need to change wires,
2/5 if you need to change wires.

Ludwig P85:
Good if it works. Although, it's been rare to find one that you can easily turn on with just one hand. Maybe I've just come across neglected ones.
Also these seem to loosen while playing. Can't really rely on these if I need to play with looser wires.
A classic strainer that Ludwig hasn't bothered to fix. Maybe it's difficult to update it without changing the looks, and changing that would cause a riot among Ludwig fans. So they have just come up with new designs, that have their own issues. Weirdly non-functional strainers for snare market leaders(?).
4/5 if it works,
usually 2/5 in practice.

DW MAG:
Works really well, you can adjust the snares easily while playing. Never accidentally loosens or opens.
Usually the looks don't matter but this is just too massive to my taste.
Function 5/5,
Looks 2/5
Let's say 4-/5

Dunnett R4:
Looks great. Weirdly stiff to use, both rotating the unit or turning it on/off. Some have rattled too much when off, so forget about timbale imitations.
I've had different era Dunnett strainers on more than 5 drums. None of them have felt smooth or that good to use. Pretty but rough.
3/5

Sonor Dual Glide:
Only experienced this on one drum, that's still quite new. Really good so far!
Holds the tension, smooth and quiet. You can adjust the tension from both sides. Zero sideways looseness.
Not the smallest, but looks good.
4/5

Trick GS007:
Works great, super reliable. Very easy to adjust while playing. Easy too change wires. Seems really durable, being machined solid metal.
Have had these on about 20 snares. Every single one has felt super smooth on all conditions, and I don't remember ever having a single problem with any of them.
On the bigger side, but I dig how it looks. Maybe I've started to love the looks BECAUSE it works so great.
4,5/5

Trick tri-step:
Everything from the previous review PLUS you have 3 positions on the lever, so it's super fast to change between those. And the tension differences are really good between those 3 position, unlike on DW MAG butt end that had way too big jumps. Maybe that's why they introduced the 5 point butt end.
5/5
 
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dsop

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Same hole pattern? If so, I'm very tempted. My Gretsch Bell Brass gets less use because of the Lightning...
I had to drill one hole. I replaced the butt side with an adjustable Yamaha.
 

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017

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Two of the best I've used are the Trick GS007 and Pearl SR-017.
 

cochlea

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I like the 3-position option on the Trick. I use it more than I ever anticipated. Some think the mechanism is big and bulky, but it's smooth, solid, and works well.
 


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