Two shell banks instead of eight different kits?

RIDDIM

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I've standardized most mounts to Optimounts, but I have different shell and head configurations, as I like the variety different shells and heads can offer.
 

paul

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I have 8x8/10x8/12x8/13x9/14x10/15x12/16x12/20x14/22x14 in rewrapped Gretsch that I use as a shell bank. I also have a Gibraltar rack set up for 4 toms and up to 6 cymbals. I have separate sets of hardware that let me use the drums in myriad setups with minimal hassle. Probably not for everyone, but it's been serving me well for a long time.

Also, most but not all of the drums are round badge, and the two biggest toms started out as marching snares. They all work together very well.
 

bubo

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I've decided to expand two of my kits into shell banks and sell the kits that will be redundant.
...
Has anyone else gone down this path?
Yup, did that but only with one kit, so my 80s Tama Superstars, Mahagoni, regular sized toms and concert toms.
Just received long sought after 6" and 8" concerts yesterday, alongisde a 12" i was also missing and a 10" i double now.

Only missing sizes today are an 18" bassdrum, 20" floor and 16" concert.
Might go for an 22" x 16" deep bassdrum someday, for i sometimes have the feel my mainly used
22" x 14" deep lacks bit of lowend in certain situations.

Absolutely satisfied with this range to choose from, can get different sounds out of the set pending what heads to use or just by different tunings with the same heads.
Must confess, apart from the "technical" point of view -lots of nerdy elements here:blush:, too...

cheers
 
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Mongrel

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It makes great sense to me, and I inadvertently arrived at a similar place myself, albeit a "poor boy" version compared to DWs and Gretsch....lol.

Started with a 60s Rogers "mongrel" kit that was a mix of Cleveland, Dayton, and early Fullerton Holiday, Tower, and Powertone pieces-12, 13, 16, 24, in Red Onyx with a COB Powertone snare.

I picked up a Cleveland 20 and 16, with a Dayton 12 all in Red Onyx in the early 90s.

In 1999 I bought a Tama Starclassic Performer "fusion" kit-10, 12, and 14, 22, with a matching snare in "Transparent Black". I was able to pick up an 8" and 16" matching toms from Dales Drumshop. So 8-10-12-14-16-22 all matching and all birch.

Over the years I threw in a couple odd balls like a Tama Rockstar Custom 18x20" bass drum in a beautiful deep blue lacquer, and a Yamaha 16x18" Stage Custom birch also in a deep blue lacquer.

So I figure I'm pretty well covered lol. I have the vintage maple vibe and the modern birch vibe in any size I could possibly "need".

Now here's the funny part...

The kit that actually leaves the house nowadays is a stripped down and refinished late 80s or early 90s Tama Stagestar that is 10, 12, 14, 18. I got them for $125 completely disassembled and missing parts. This is my current "go to" kit.....

Nice having options!
 

Neal Pert

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I'm heading for this, more or less. 10/12/13/14ft/16ft/18bd/22bd, all Broadkaster. I mean, what it REALLY is is just a 10/12/14/18 bop kit and a 13/16/22 rock kit, right? I really can't imagine that there'll be a lot of gigs where I don't use one or the other option. But maybe there will be. I can imagine all sorts of possibilities. But I'm equipping them all with the same heads (UV1/G1 coated toms, UV1 EQ4/coated logo basses) so all the options will be on the table. I also have this little Tama Club-JAM kit which I'll be using for little restaurant type gigs.
 

cribbon

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Currently I have eight drum sets. I need to down size as I'm out of room, but I don't want to loose the versatility that I have.

So...

I've decided to expand two of my kits into shell banks and sell the kits that will be redundant.

I have a 2008 DW Collector's Series kit in broken glass finish. 8", 10", 12", 13", 14" FT, 16" FT and 18"x22" bass drum. I have three matching snare drums, a 5"x14" Ten and six, a 6 1/2"x13" Edge, and a 5 1/2"x14" Super Solid. My intent is to order 16"x20" and 18"x24" bass drums for this kit.

I also have a 2019 Gretsch USA Custom kit in silver glass nitron wrap, a finish very similar to DW's broken glass. That kit is currently 10", 12", 14 FT, 16" FT, and a 14"x22" bass drum. I recently ordered a 5"x14" matching snare drum and a 14"x20" matching bass drum. My intent is to also order a 13" tom, 14"x24" bass drum and a 6 1/2"x14" snare to match.

The DW Collectors Series and Gretsch USA Custom kits have very different personalities, I feel that a shell bank of each would allow me to cover any possible situation in the future and still take up less room than the additional six drum sets that I currently own. The kits that I sell will pay for some of the new drums, I'm guessing that it could take a year or two to get all of the new drums ordered and delivered.

Has anyone else gone down this path?
Somewhat similar. All carbon fiber drums (except for the concert tom, which is fiberglass): 20 & 22 kicks; 14 & 16 floors; 8 concert tom; 10 & 12 standard racks; 10,12,14 short stacks - all toms take 10.5mm L- rod mounting post. Plus 8,10,12 DW piccolo toms & 13 Pearl flat timbale, all with mounts that also accept 10.5mm L-rod. 5x14 Blacro snare.
The outlier is my hybrid project: a Tama Metro Jam kit (16 kick, 10 rack, 13 floor & 12 snare) that I'm planning to outfit with triggers to fire a 2box brain.
 

Bri6366

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If I had either a DW or Gretsch USA Custom Shell bank, I'd get a beater kit for the gigs I didn't want to bring an expensive set on and call it a day. Having both the DW and Gretsch would be amazing.

But I still like the idea of a smaller Gretsch jazz kit with the 18" or 20", a mainstream modern 10/12/14/16/22 (DW, Pearl, Yamaha, etc., they are all great) and an obnoxiously loud rock kit with a kick that rattles the walls.
 
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I did what the OP describes, but I stumbled upon the idea very early on. When I was younger I fell in love with the (original) Yamaha Tour Customs, and I (of course) loved my Gretsch "jazz" drums too. They were (to my ears) quite opposite sounding drums: (Lacquered, Japanese power sizes with sharp edges and thin triple flange vs. Wrapped, American Made, standard depths, with rounder edges, and thick die casts.) I loved the way that BOTH sets sounded. I couldn't make a decision as to which set I liked "more." But I really didn't have to make that decision.

I had already bought a pretty big set of the Tours originally because a drum teacher-mentor advised me to so I had set-up options, and I had the little Gretsch's. So I just decided to casually look for used orphan Yamaha Cobalt Blue Tour Custom and Black Nitron's Gretsch's to create more options for each set for my career. No big deal.

Eventually I wound up having Yamaha Tour Customs Cobalt Blue drums in all sizes toms 8-18 and bd's from 18-24. Recently I have even duplicated some sizes and had the deeper duplicate toms cut down to standard depths for more "options." At the same time I (eventually) also found used Gretsch Black Nitron (jasper shelled drums only) in all sizes as well. I have these drums in all the same sizes but all in standard depth toms 8-18 and bd's 18-24.

I also decided to it all of the drums with RIMS and Yamaha tom mounts to severely cut down on my hardware needs, and because nothing beats the Yamaha tom hardware. It really doesn't take THAT much space to have all these drums, and only a few sets of hardware that work for all of the drums. The hardware decision was a good one. I can't imagine having to have different hardware for the two sets. The potential for hardware mixups on a gig could be awful.

This equipment choice is one that I strongly suggest for a PROFESSIONAL musician-drummer, once you find a set of drums that you REALLY like. The flexibility in size, sound, set-up, and being able to leave drums at locations that you play-work-rehearse or record often is also a nice option to have. Is this necessary? NO. Is it convenient? YES.

It also allowed me to become very knowledgeable about my drums (sound) and what they will and won't do, and what they do best. As I have said before, the Gretsch's all have the edges done, the lugs packed, mufflers removed, and faulty hardware replaced. The Gretsch's have been tweaked SERIOUSLY. I never any gear surprises on the gig. NEVER. And every aspect of the Yamaha's is super consistent.

I am glad I did this when I did before the drum industry started to over-engineer and over-think everything, and before prices began taking off. I never heard the "shell bank" term until much later. To me I was just spending money that I had to spend (or give it to Uncle Sam each year,) and creating professional options for myself.

Now I don't even think about new drum sets. I have the best of both worlds. A great sounding "modern" set (although the Tour Customs were made in the 80's,) and a great sounding "vintage" set (Gretsch's.) DONE.

MSG
 

JDA

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What a second wait a second What's 2 shell banks..

You cutting corners somewhere... done right you only need 1 ' )
 
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drummer5359

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I did what the OP describes, but I stumbled upon the idea very early on. When I was younger I fell in love with the (original) Yamaha Tour Customs, and I (of course) loved my Gretsch "jazz" drums too. They were (to my ears) quite opposite sounding drums: (Lacquered, Japanese power sizes with sharp edges and thin triple flange vs. Wrapped, American Made, standard depths, with rounder edges, and thick die casts.) I loved the way that BOTH sets sounded. I couldn't make a decision as to which set I liked "more." But I really didn't have to make that decision.

I had already bought a pretty big set of the Tours originally because a drum teacher-mentor advised me to so I had set-up options, and I had the little Gretsch's. So I just decided to casually look for used orphan Yamaha Cobalt Blue Tour Custom and Black Nitron's Gretsch's to create more options for each set for my career. No big deal.

Eventually I wound up having Yamaha Tour Customs Cobalt Blue drums in all sizes toms 8-18 and bd's from 18-24. Recently I have even duplicated some sizes and had the deeper duplicate toms cut down to standard depths for more "options." At the same time I (eventually) also found used Gretsch Black Nitron (jasper shelled drums only) in all sizes as well. I have these drums in all the same sizes but all in standard depth toms 8-18 and bd's 18-24.

I also decided to it all of the drums with RIMS and Yamaha tom mounts to severely cut down on my hardware needs, and because nothing beats the Yamaha tom hardware. It really doesn't take THAT much space to have all these drums, and only a few sets of hardware that work for all of the drums. The hardware decision was a good one. I can't imagine having to have different hardware for the two sets. The potential for hardware mixups on a gig could be awful.

This equipment choice is one that I strongly suggest for a PROFESSIONAL musician-drummer, once you find a set of drums that you REALLY like. The flexibility in size, sound, set-up, and being able to leave drums at locations that you play-work-rehearse or record often is also a nice option to have. Is this necessary? NO. Is it convenient? YES.

It also allowed me to become very knowledgeable about my drums (sound) and what they will and won't do, and what they do best. As I have said before, the Gretsch's all have the edges done, the lugs packed, mufflers removed, and faulty hardware replaced. The Gretsch's have been tweaked SERIOUSLY. I never any gear surprises on the gig. NEVER. And every aspect of the Yamaha's is super consistent.

I am glad I did this when I did before the drum industry started to over-engineer and over-think everything, and before prices began taking off. I never heard the "shell bank" term until much later. To me I was just spending money that I had to spend (or give it to Uncle Sam each year,) and creating professional options for myself.

Now I don't even think about new drum sets. I have the best of both worlds. A great sounding "modern" set (although the Tour Customs were made in the 80's,) and a great sounding "vintage" set (Gretsch's.) DONE.

MSG
Good, deal! I wish that I'd thought of it, been able to afford it, and done it years ago. Good for you!

There is an old saying, "Great minds think alike, and so do ours..."
 

jskdrums

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You have 2 wonderful kits! Makes me wonder what are the other 6 that you will be letting go?

YMMV but for me the DW & Gretsch both represent unique sounding kits but both lean towards modern sounds. For me when I think of Vintage I think of 60's or earlier Ludwig, Rogers, Sonor, etc.
 

drummer5359

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You have 2 wonderful kits! Makes me wonder what are the other 6 that you will be letting go?

YMMV but for me the DW & Gretsch both represent unique sounding kits but both lean towards modern sounds. For me when I think of Vintage I think of 60's or earlier Ludwig, Rogers, Sonor, etc.
The other kits...

- A 1975 Slingerland black chrome finish kit. (Slingerland called the finish "Blakrome".) 12", 13", 16", 18", with a 22" virgin bass. I've owned this set since 1992, up until I bought the DWs in 2008 these Slingerlands were my primary kit. I bought a set of Humes & Berg Enduro cases for them in the 90s, but they already had some scars on them. It's a great sounding kit, still looks good from the stage when I play them out.

- A 1966 Slingerland champagne sparkle finish Gene Krupa Model 1n kit. 13", 16", with a 20" bass with a rail mount. (I removed the rail mount and have it safely stored away.) I use a snare stand for the high tom.) My very first "good" kit was a clean set of 1965 champagne sparkle Slingerlands that I bought from the original owner. In the 80s I sold that kit when I was going through difficult financial times. This kit is in super clean condition. Once I have everything in place for the two shell banks this will be the last kit to go. In fact, if I have the room this will be the one kit that I'd hang onto. (I already had one of these get away, and I know that I'd never find one as clean.)

- A walnut finish 1981 Gretsch "Drop-G" kit. 12", 13", 16", 18" with a 22" bass. I bought this kit in 2008, shortly before I got my DWs. In the time that I owned it Stanton Moore used it once for a Master class at a local drum School. Hannah Ford (Hannah Welton) also used it for a clinic. A talented young local drummer used it on his first album, I lent it to him several times and finally sold it to him four years ago. He has a new baby and both his and his wife's cars needed some mechanical work done. I recently bought them back from him until he can afford to buy them back from me. (I didn't even pick them up.) In any case, they are a special kit to me. Although I owned a Gretsch kit years ago, this is the kit that made me a true Gretsch believer. (Up until two weeks ago I had an early 70s Slingerland sparkling blue pearl kit with a 24" bass drum. I sold that kit in order to afford to buy this Gretsch kit back. I already miss the thump of that 24" bass. That is some of the reason for me coming up with the idea of putting together two shell banks.)

- A midnight blue pearl finish 1972 Gretsch stop sign badge kit. 12", 13", 16" and a 20" bass drum. I bought this kit a few years ago from it's second owner. He got it for his 15th birthday in 1978. He quit playing in the mid-80s when he got married and started a family. He packed the kit up and it sat un-played in an attic for thirty years. The wrap on the bass drum was separated from the shell, warped, and baked hard over time. Lou Ross at Pittsburgh Drum Exchange removed the warped piece of wrap at the bottom of the shell and replaced it with a fresh piece of midnight blue pearl wrap. he did a great, clean repair. He replaced missing inlays on the bass drum hoops at the same time. I have the trap case, all of the original hardware, and vinyl bags for the drums embossed with the Gretsch logo. Although it is imperfect, it is a cool little kit.

- A 1960s champagne sparkle finish Gretsch stop sign badge Progressive Jazz kit. 12", 14", with a 20" bass drum and matching snare. (I also have a Max Roach snare in the matching finish.) I sold several kits a few years back in order to buy this. It truly is a great kit, deserving of it's status in the world of drumming. I ordered the 20" bass drum to match my new USA Custom kit as the first part of my expansion toward a shell pack partly to be able to replicate this kit in small rooms.

- A 1970s walnut finish Gretsch stop sign badge kit. 12", 16", and a 22" bass drum. I bought this kit this past April because I missed my drop G walnut kit.
 
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jskdrums

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You have some amazing kits drumer5359! It would be hard for me to let them go. I thin the herd by leaving kits in various cities where I gig. This makes me feel like less of a drum hoarder ;-)
 

drummer5359

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I thought that I'd update this thread about my shell bank quest.

I currently have a Gretsch USA Custom 14" x 5" snare, 13" x 9" tom and 20" x 14" bass drum on order.

These will join the 10" x 7", 12" x 8", 14" x 14", 16" x 16", 22" x 14" kit that I received in June.

Next up I'm ordering an 18" x 14" bass drum and 14" x 6.5 snare. I'm still up in the air as to whether I need a 24" x 14" Gretsch bass drum, but I likely will end up ordering one.

To complete the DW Collector's Series shell bank I only need 20" x 16" and 24" x 18" bass drums.

So far I have my congas and two kits on consignment at a local drum shop. As gear sells I'll continue ordering until I'm done.
 
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