Two Toms or One Tom Up

Kln_BC

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I started with 2 up 2 down, then 1 up 2 down, then 1 up 1 down. It was cool, different, ride was in a way better spot and it felt like a lot less gear. I really missed those toms though and I'll go back to 2 up 2 down when I get my new kit.
 

Fat Drummer

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I like having a nice size shell bank and letting the music dictate what I need to bring. Most jobs only need 1 or 2 toms, maybe 2 cymbals and I'm golden.... but if the music calls for a 6, or 7 or 15 piece kit then play what's needed!

I enjoy it all and find it frustrating when someone wants to impose their personal preference on my equipment decisions! I'm MAD AS HE..uh... what? Oh sorry... just a flash back to my anger management classes.... you know the ones the Judge ordered me to take after punching that guy in the throat!!
 
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pwc1141

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With one exception of a very portable Take Go-Kit, I have always had 4 piece kits regardless of genre played. It seemed traditional to me, I guess, and using more than one ride and one crash cymbal a 4 piece suited me fine. Jazz has less run down or up the toms fill moments and while I understand drummers who like more toms it was never for me.
 

CSR

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You might want to master one up/one down before you feel the need to add more voices. More isn’t necessarily better, it’s just heavier and takes up more real estate. From the audience, most listeners won’t be able to differentiate two toms from seventeen.
 

SwivoNut

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One up puts the ride cymbal AND cowbell in a more favorable position. Our big band plays a fair amount of Latin tunes where I need my mambo bell in close proximity to my snare drum. On bossa novas, for example, I play left cross stick rim clicks on the snare. On the bridge I move the butt of the stick just few degrees north to play on the lip of the mambo bell, then back to the snare. I've devised all kinds of contraptions trying to get the cowbell in a favorable position on a five-piece set but none have worked to my satisfaction. That cowbell in that position is so essential to the music we play and to my style of playing that it's worth it to not have that extra tom where my ride cymbal and cowbell reside.
 

MrDrums2112

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Since 2012 it’s been a 4 pc. kit for me and I love every minute of it. It’s all personal preference of course, and for me I don’t think creativity has suffered at all by having less drums and cymbals in front of me.
 

backtodrum

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I have a a kit that is 8,10,12,14,16 toms and I haven't set it all up in years. I have become lazy in my old age and generally play 1 up 1 down. To further the down size syndrome I prefer to play my bop kit with an 18" bass drum for most gigs, with it miced up through 18" subs it has plenty of bottom end oomph to feel deep in you chest, so I prefer the portability and ease of load in with that kit as well. As I've aged I have become much less concerned with the whole hey look at me I'm the drummer stuff... I love the look of a huge kit but the music I play simply doesn't require it anymore much less the load out at 1:00 in the morning... But to each their own, that's what makes drums so interesting to me is everyone's ideas and approach to them.
 

Bandit

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I have a a kit that is 8,10,12,14,16 toms and I haven't set it all up in years. I have become lazy in my old age and generally play 1 up 1 down. To further the down size syndrome I prefer to play my bop kit with an 18" bass drum for most gigs, with it miced up through 18" subs it has plenty of bottom end oomph to feel deep in you chest, so I prefer the portability and ease of load in with that kit as well. As I've aged I have become much less concerned with the whole hey look at me I'm the drummer stuff... I love the look of a huge kit but the music I play simply doesn't require it anymore much less the load out at 1:00 in the morning... But to each their own, that's what makes drums so interesting to me is everyone's ideas and approach to them.
Good reply. I won’t do any less than 3 up 1 down.
 

dcrigger

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Started on a 4 piece - but after making the transition to 2 up, I never really went back. I can, of course, play one up, but two up always feels like home base for me.

As far as the ride goes, I find I barely bring the ride close at all when playing one up. First off, I've come to hate playing them flat - so even with a four piece my ride is up and tilted. Again, that's just feels like home base for me.

But that's just me. Overall I don't think there is any right or wrong to this.
 

paul

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I turned 72 last month (I'm still getting used to being over 70). My working big band/rock setup is 12/13/15/16/22 plus snare. If it's a small group I go with 10/12/14/15/20 and snare. I really like playing jazz with multiple toms. I don't care what the "usual" is. I showed a kid a picture of the jazz kit I used at the time, a 9 piece Yamaha, and he asked, "How do you play jazz on so many drums?" Moron.
 

Drm1979

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Jazz drummers don't have the luxury of time to go-
digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-digga-Crash
Too funny
 


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