Unbelievable !- Paiste PST7 vs. Paiste 2002

drumsforme

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2007
Messages
252
Reaction score
45
Location
South Florida
Stopped off to see a friend's band after my gig this Friday, and after playing my gig with my usual Paiste Red Label 2002 cymbals- medium crashes...I got to hear and then sit in for two tunes with my buddy's Paiste PST7 cymbals- Heavy series, and I know threads have been published here before about these but the similarities between the two are just hard to believe. The 16 & 18 Heavy PST7 crashes sounded almost exactly like the medium 2002 crashes. I went outside and got my 18" 2002 during break and put it next to the equivalent PS7 18" crash and I couldn't believe my ears....and I have been gigging for close to 40 years.
. Any thoughts on this?
 

tris66

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2014
Messages
398
Reaction score
35
Location
3rd world
Yeah, they sound only slightly less refined to my ears. Killer pies for the price.
 

Tama CW

DFO Veteran
Joined
Mar 4, 2018
Messages
1,512
Reaction score
718
Location
SE Connecticut
Probably best cymbal bang for the buck in used Paiste's. A 16-18-20 + hat set recently sold on Ebay for under $200. Bonzoleum had a video on the pro's of the PST7 crashes....especially the 18" thin PST7. That one sounds incredibly like an 18" sound formula or signature. But when you really focus, you can hear the additional shimmer and overtones of the higher end cymbals. They just ring forever. The PST7's go away quicker. My ideal set of PST 7's would be thin 18" and thin 20" for both ride/crash duties. The PST7's are great intermediate cymbals....and far ahead of the more tinny PST3's and 5's.....just great for crashes.

If you go the Paiste web site, there are sound files to compare all their lines up against each other. Very informative.
 

NYFrank

Very well Known Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2008
Messages
1,040
Reaction score
78
Location
Northeast U.S.
I have some PST5's - not crashes, but a ride and hats. I think both are very good, and amazing for the money.
Everything I have hard on the 7's leads me to believe they are a great deal. My only nit negative is I'm not a fan of the red ink. Wish they wouldn't have done that.

It's great having a value option in cymbals that is legit.
 

RyanR

Underaged Curmudgeon
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
Messages
4,955
Reaction score
205
Location
Athens, OH
Agreed! Some of the cheaper Paistes pair great with 2002's. I was actually after a certain sound, and was surprised to find it in one of the cheaper Paiste lines.

-Ryan
 

Stonefunky

Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Location
RI
Another fan of PST5, PST7, PSTxs here... And I do have lots of premium bronze. Paiste has always done a great job with their cheap bronze cymbals, and with consistency in general. If you hear a Paiste that you like, and go buy that model, you will like it. Not always so with the other guys. IMHO, the PST stuff does rock VERY well, and often right at the level of much, much more expensive stuff... so why pay a premium? I dont play a lot of hard rock, so not looking to have a huge investment in cymbals for the genre. But I have a set that sounds as good as anything and I think they look good in a modern way. (Ive had a recent, similarly positive experience with Sabian SR2, plan on posting a short review)
 

1up2dn

DFO Veteran
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
Messages
2,328
Reaction score
108
Location
rockies
i've been on a dark/trashy cymbal love fest for years now....but i recently collected a set of new pst 7's...20 light ride/19 med/18 med/14 medium hats (new beat weights)...man i love these things...
 

MrDrums2112

"Normal" Drummer
Joined
Apr 23, 2012
Messages
4,393
Reaction score
448
Location
Tolland, CT
The PST7 14" Light hats are some of the nicest I have ever heard or played in any brand or line. They sound great, and they feel great under the stick. The 2002 hats play a bit stiffer, IMO. I'm not sure my ears could tell much difference between the PST7s and 2002s in a blind test.
 

tillerva

Forum Guru...yeh right :p
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
4,793
Reaction score
142
Wow, about $120 new for an 18". That's crazy.
 

1up2dn

DFO Veteran
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
Messages
2,328
Reaction score
108
Location
rockies
tillerva said:
Wow, about $120 new for an 18". That's crazy.
you can get these for less than that...$125 for a 20...$117 for a 19...$108 for an 18...$140 for the hats...new
 

bubo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2014
Messages
100
Reaction score
38
Location
GER
Been discussing the PST-7 in another thread on this board quite a while ago.
Yes they are great cymbals regarding the price!

I just use regular crashes from 17" to 19" and a 20" Light Ride as a crash.
What i found is that they sound very similar compared to 2oo2 at louder volumes when you have a strong attack,
but lack of complexity a lower volumes.

You can´t work them PST-7s out dynamically like a 2oo2, -hard to explain since i am not native english speaking, let me try anyway:

Say if you want a soft "ssshhhhhhhh" that stays over the tune for some bars with out too much of an "bbbshh-like" attack,
the 2oo2 do much much better, wider frequency range thus seem to be louder and stay longer.

Anyway took them PST-7 to lots of gigs and never got lost no matter what size of venue or how far the (3) guitarrists went...
Another point is that i never broke any of mine PST-7 till now, while the Signatures i played before did not last too long....
 
Last edited:

drumsforme

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2007
Messages
252
Reaction score
45
Location
South Florida
I agree with you as far as complexity, The 2002 yes but I believe the PST7 is a B8 sheet bronze and the 2002 is a cast B8 Bronze. I think that may make the 2002 better cymbal. PST7- pretty amazing sheet bronze cymbal.

My main cymbals are Paiste 2002=20 Red,20Black ,18,18 Med,16,16,Med, 14, 12, 10. 14' Hats
 

1up2dn

DFO Veteran
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
Messages
2,328
Reaction score
108
Location
rockies
2002 and Pst7 are both sheet bronze of the same B8....main differences are profile and hammering...the lathing technique looks to be the same...the hammering being the key cost and sound difference...

that said these Pst7 sound great and are quite thin even in the medium weights (my 18 is 1428g)...for me the thin weights in these cymbals are too thin and at greater risk of denting/bending in this B8 alloy
 

slinginit

Shake, bump, and shake again...
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
2,507
Reaction score
50
Location
Arlington, VA
If I may get technical, all cymbals are cast bronze. Some cymbals are made from individually-cast ingots while others are made from a cast sheet of bronze. Casting refers to a metallurgic process of alloying the elements. Individual casts, then rolled flat, and shaped/cut into discs prior to shaping, tempering, hammering and lathing. In the case of Paiste, bronze is cast then rolled into sheets from which individual discs are cut, shaped tempered, hammered, and lathed. Ultimately, the process is the same; it just depends upon when the individual instruments are separated from the herd.
 

ThomFloor

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2017
Messages
468
Reaction score
172
slinginit said:
If I may get technical, all cymbals are cast bronze. Some cymbals are made from individually-cast ingots while others are made from a cast sheet of bronze. Casting refers to a metallurgic process of alloying the elements. Individual casts, then rolled flat, and shaped/cut into discs prior to shaping, tempering, hammering and lathing. In the case of Paiste, bronze is cast then rolled into sheets from which individual discs are cut, shaped tempered, hammered, and lathed. Ultimately, the process is the same; it just depends upon when the individual instruments are separated from the herd.
Technical is good. In detail though not all Paistes are rolled sheets. For B20 cymbals (Twenty, Twenty Custom, Masters, 602) they get ingots from Turkey.
 

zenstat

Senior Cymbal Nerd
Joined
Feb 5, 2012
Messages
4,169
Reaction score
1,030
Location
Auckland New Zealand
ThomFloor said:
If I may get technical, all cymbals are cast bronze. Some cymbals are made from individually-cast ingots while others are made from a cast sheet of bronze. Casting refers to a metallurgic process of alloying the elements. Individual casts, then rolled flat, and shaped/cut into discs prior to shaping, tempering, hammering and lathing. In the case of Paiste, bronze is cast then rolled into sheets from which individual discs are cut, shaped tempered, hammered, and lathed. Ultimately, the process is the same; it just depends upon when the individual instruments are separated from the herd.
Technical is good. In detail though not all Paistes are rolled sheets. For B20 cymbals (Twenty, Twenty Custom, Masters, 602) they get ingots from Turkey.
The 602 material was originally supplied by SwissMetals (closed down some years ago), and for the reissue 602s it comes from a German producer. The 602 material is not from Turkey. As far as I know all Paistes are rolled sheets, just as all Zildjian and Sabian and Meinl are. And all the myriad of modern Turkish brands. Some Chinese cymbals may still just be hammered out to a flat shape without rolling, although rolling seems to have been brought in to factories there. The only cymbals which don't involve a sheet being rolled out are UFiP which are cast in the shape of a cymbal. They just get hammering and lathing but no rolling since they come out of the mold already curved with a bell in place.

And yes, just to underscore what has been said before the sonic properties of the finished cymbal owe more to how it is shaped, hammered, and lathed than to the alloy. Johan VDS (RIP) did an excellent job of demonstrating just what sonic quality could be had from B8 as well as B15 and B20. Here is an extreme Johan from a 2002

http://users.telenet.be/cymbzdrumz/PAISTE_2002_extreme_modification/

and a bunch of examples from B8 and B15 as well as B20

http://www.malleus.byethost13.com/3_BEFORE_AND_AFTER_MODIFICATION/?i=1

Recently a few of us have been blown away by a cymbal in Brass usually associated with beginner cymbals.


The difference is what you do with the alloy after it is cast. And Mr Yamamoto does some very nice things, although his cymbals may not appeal to everybody if you don't like cymbals with the thin Old Stamp K Zildjian trashy vibe. Hopefully you will still agree this doesn't sound like your usual beginner Brass cymbal.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Latest posts



Top