Undecided between these two kits, please help me decide

Cauldronics

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I had the Tama Superstar Classic. It was a big disappointment and the worst Tama kit I've played. The Yamaha is higher quality and better sounding. There's no contest between them.
 

HoorayGuy

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It's a head scratcher, like when did China start making decent stuff?
I made the mistake of mentioning something about crap China makes to an Asian. Oops. However, he set me straight, he said, "we can make high quality stuff as well, it's just, we have to make whatever we are told to make. You want junk, you get junk."
 

Cauldronics

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I should point out what I found to be the pros/cons of each kit.

Tama: floor toms needed some iron in their diet. Had no guts or projection, and a flat tone. Rack toms were nice but didn't have much sustain (which can be good). Bass drum was decent from behind the kit, but not very loud or projecting.

Yamaha: Kind of the opposite of the Tama. Everything balanced, full, and the sound carries out into the room. No weak spots in the tone or projection.
 

felis

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I had a couple of the Yamaha bop sets. They sounded great, but I couldn't stand seeing the 6 lugs per side on the bass drum.
It bothered me enough that I sold them. Shallow - I know. :p

So Tama wins on the 8 lugs per side bass drum. But IMO, it loses on the spurs.
I also like the Yamaha YESS mount.

So...not much help from me, I guess. :dontknow:
 

mtarrani

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I looked at the PDP Concept kit as well as the DW Frequent Flyer when they were offering that kit in bop sizes. Two "features" that guarantee I would NEVER purchase either (or the growing number of other brands that have them) are cut outs on the BD hoop and integrated risers. I personally will not use a riser on any bass drum 16" and larger, and HATE the cut out batter side hoops.
 

Hypercaffium

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Ox Han

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Thanks.
Which genere of music do you play?
I'm a noob, so forgive me if I say something stupid, but I guess the name "bop/bebop/jazz" is used just to describe any "vintage" looking kit with just one rack tom and a smaller kick drum, right? I think you can play pretty much any genre of music with those.
no - bop usually refers to the sizes and it's implementation mostly in jazz, which is 18 kick w/ 12 rack and 14 floor. Swapping out the kick for a 20 is also referred to as a "bop" kit by some companies, downbeat by Ludwig, and described as "versatile" by most manufacturers. 22/13/16 is the "rock" kit, but you can do rock with a 20/12/14 too. YMMV
 

Ox Han

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I looked at the PDP Concept kit as well as the DW Frequent Flyer when they were offering that kit in bop sizes. Two "features" that guarantee I would NEVER purchase either (or the growing number of other brands that have them) are cut outs on the BD hoop and integrated risers. I personally will not use a riser on any bass drum 16" and larger, and HATE the cut out batter side hoops.
What's a cut out batter side hoop?
 

varatrodder

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varatrodder

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I don't mind a riser on small bass drums. I would rather use a riser than adjust the feel of my pedal.

The notch on the DW kits is small enough that you could just swap the hoop to the reso side if you don't use the riser. Honestly, no one in the audience will care if there is a little notch on the hoop.
 

mtarrani

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I don't mind a riser on small bass drums. I would rather use a riser than adjust the feel of my pedal.

The notch on the DW kits is small enough that you could just swap the hoop to the reso side if you don't use the riser. Honestly, no one in the audience will care if there is a little notch on the hoop.
I will care. If they made that as an option, fine. Plus, not using the riser does not make it go away. It's still there, even if I remove it, holes are there, and it's extra work I should not have to endure. I came close to purchasing one of their Frequent Flyer kits until I spotted that. Not for me. Oh, and the stupid perforated head on the BD reso side (of the FF kit) was another reason.
 

thejohnlec

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I’ve never played this particular Tama line so I can't give any comparison. I own a Yamaha SC in 10”, 12”, 16”, and 22”. It has a matching snare but I rarely use it. Our band plays a very wide variety of styles and the Yamahas handle them all without breaking a sweat. Warm and punchy, easy to tune, and solid build quality.
 


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