Unusual or unexpected rhythm sections that just groove so well

Dan Felix

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Hi All

I happened across Alice Cooper's 1991 "Hey Stoopid" album recently. Songwriting and production aside, I just want to commend on the bass and drum relationship. Godamn superb!

The rhythm section just grooves so incrediblY well. Not surprising really. Mickey Curry on drums and Hugh McDonald on bass. I don't know if these guys had played together before, or since, but they're superb. The pocket sits just right and drives hard.

This album may not be everyone's cup of tea but the feel is great. Hell, it's not usually my cup of tea this music but it is so good I keep going back for more.

Disclaimer bias - I think Mickey Curry is one of the really great session groove players.

Every now and then album credits reveal some magical and maybe even unique combos. What others can you suggest?

Dan
 

Mongrel

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Not sure how unusual or unexpected it is...but the first thing that came to mind for a relatively unknown groove was Steve Miller Band Shu Ba Da Du Ma Ma Ma off of "The Joker" released 1973...

Gerald Johnson (bass) John King (drums) just smoke this tune. Tight, funky, no tricks or games on the production, drums right up front in the mix. Tune just flows. Check out the hi hat work and the bass solo.

Listen here:
 
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Merlin5

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Mongrel said:
Not sure how unusual or unexpected it is...but the first thing that came to mind for a relatively unknown groove was Steve Miller Band Shu Ba Da Du Ma Ma Ma off of "The Joker" released 1973...

Gerald Johnson (bass) John King (drums) just smoke this tune. Tight, funky, no tricks or games on the production, drums right up front in the mix. Tune just flows. Check out the hi hat work and the bass solo.

Listen here:
Not heard that before. Completely agree with you, that's a great groove and some tasty bass playing.


Groove on Clapton's Cocaine is superb. I guess not in the category of unusual or unexpected though, (I just re-read the thread title). Very simple 1 & 3 kick, 2 & 4 snare and some economical tasty fills. I thought the drummer might have been Jamie Oldaker but apparently it's Ralph Pimentel whose name I vaguely recall. The ride bell on the solos is gorgeous.


And this song from 1974 by a british hard rock band called Trapeze. Pocketplayer who posts here linked me to this a while ago, and it's got a nifty groove.

 
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Treviso1

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Merlin5 said:
Not sure how unusual or unexpected it is...but the first thing that came to mind for a relatively unknown groove was Steve Miller Band Shu Ba Da Du Ma Ma Ma off of "The Joker" released 1973...

Gerald Johnson (bass) John King (drums) just smoke this tune. Tight, funky, no tricks or games on the production, drums right up front in the mix. Tune just flows. Check out the hi hat work and the bass solo.

Listen here:
Not heard that before. Completely agree with you, that's a great groove and some tasty bass playing.


Groove on Clapton's Cocaine is superb. I guess not in the category of unusual or unexpected though, (I just re-read the thread title). Very simple 1 & 3 kick, 2 & 4 snare and some economical tasty fills. I thought the drummer might have been Jamie Oldaker but apparently it's Ralph Pimentel whose name I vaguely recall. The ride bell on the solos is gorgeous.


And this song from 1974 by a british hard rock band called Trapeze. Pocketplayer who posts here linked me to this a while ago, and it's got a nifty groove.

I totally agree with the groove on the original Eric Clapton version of "Cocaine"...that groove has always blown my mind. It's just other worldly great. I always thought that it was Jamie Oldaker... I really can't find much about Ralph Pimentel... I'm not convinced on this story, honestly. It sounds like Oldaker's groove.
 
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Merlin5

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Treviso, you inspired me do a search again and it turns out it was indeed Jamie Oldaker! I had previously looked up 'Cocaine' on discogs.com which is where I normally go to find album credits, and now I realise I was looking at another song called Cocaine, from some 1988 album called Old Lady Drivers and I just assumed it was one of Clapton's albums. Cocaine was released in '77 on the Slowhand album. :)
 

Treviso1

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Merlin5 said:
Treviso, you inspired me do a search again and it turns out it was indeed Jamie Oldaker! I had previously looked up 'Cocaine' on discogs.com which is where I normally go to find album credits, and now I realise I was looking at another song called Cocaine, from some 1988 album called Old Lady Drivers and I just assumed it was one of Clapton's albums. Cocaine was released in '77 on the Slowhand album. :)
:)
 

ThomFloor

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Jamie Oldaker had wicked one-handed 16th notes on HH. Same with Purdie, Gadson and Porcaro of course. I think they all grooved with anybody.
 

BennyK

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Tony Williams - Jack Bruce

Buddy Miles - John McGlaughlin (sp)

Connie Kay - Van Morrison- Bill Church

 

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