Useful tool for woodshedding dynamics

mtarrani

DFO Star
Joined
Sep 24, 2006
Messages
10,209
Reaction score
3,001
Location
Deltona, FL
I usually have an SPL dB meter one meter (or yard if you don't want to quibble about a few centimeters) from my thrown. A normal room with nothing much happening is the 40.5 display. The trick is to keep the meter at under 100 at that distance while wood shedding for dynamics (various tempos with the same SPL dB results.) Here is the meter that I am using. There may be better ones out there, but for my purposes it works well (including when I am rehearsing with my band):


Here is my placement of the meter (the red arrow is pointing to it in the photo):

Brooklyn9c.jpg
 

JimmySticks

DFO Master
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2019
Messages
3,036
Reaction score
3,816
Location
Queens NY
I like the idea!

I seem to start out at a nice soft dynamic, but I know I start creeping up as I play on. ( I get excited!) This could really help! Thanks
 

swarfrat

tympanus laqueus XV
Joined
Dec 15, 2014
Messages
6,853
Reaction score
1,968
I found this with a real snare and electronic bass drum. Keep the volume super low on the electronics and work on the snare. You could probably accomplish something similar playing along to music at super low volume.
 

paul

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
3,077
Reaction score
1,222
Location
Lewisville, TX
When working on patterns I play them as softly as possible. If I can play it soft, playing loud is easy.

I remember my high school band director, who gave me private lessons, making me perform "Connecticut Halftime" with each phrase first pianissimo and then fortissimo. And he was adamant about softness. Later on, when I joined my big band the leader insisted that the whole band be able to play at whisper level while maintaining the energy level. Both lessons have stood me in good stead.
 

mtarrani

DFO Star
Joined
Sep 24, 2006
Messages
10,209
Reaction score
3,001
Location
Deltona, FL
When working on patterns I play them as softly as possible. If I can play it soft, playing loud is easy.

I remember my high school band director, who gave me private lessons, making me perform "Connecticut Halftime" with each phrase first pianissimo and then fortissimo. And he was adamant about softness. Later on, when I joined my big band the leader insisted that the whole band be able to play at whisper level while maintaining the energy level. Both lessons have stood me in good stead.
We are very close in age. Your education is consistent with what I picked up (I never had lessons back in the day, but dynamics were essential even in a garage band.) It sounds like you had some invaluable lessons from teachers who knew what they were doing ... and, bravo!, you took it to heart.
 


Top