Values of NOS snares, and drums

rsq911

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Hi everyone!
This thread started because I have a brand new (nos), 1994 Ludwig black beauty piccolo, engraved, limited edition with number plate, in the plastic bag, in the case, in a plastic bag, in the original cardboard box.
How much value is added to a drum if it is brand new, unplayed, and vintage? Is this like any other collectible in the original box/wrapper? Or should I open a bottle of wine, take it out of the box, and play it?
 

Radio King

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My inclination would be to enjoy it. Store the original heads and wires, replace them with modern, and enjoy the drum. If you decide to sell later on, put back the original heads/wires, sell as "mint, with original unplayed heads". Shouldn't devalue much at all to a buyer, so long as it's unscathed.
 

NobleCooleyNut

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Being that it is a piccolo automatically reduces the amount of potential customers. This is no alight on the drum, just a fact that less people are in the market for a piccolo black beauty than the other sizes .

RadioKing gave you some very sage advice .
 

JazzDrumGuy

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RK has some great advice. BUT, is the box still sealed? Also, do you wanna play it now or do you wanna sell it? As for a piccolo BB, I scored a horribly beaten one for an incredible price - very damaged and literally a parts snare but I was able to make it work. I put some die casts on it and it is a fantastic drum.....very underrated, and rare....
 

Tama CW

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There is no single formula to determine this as there are so many factors in play: Brand, Model, collectibility, age, condition, packaging, initial issue price (MSRP), how many survive in "new" or "nearly new" condition, etc.

Your best bet is to find a near duplicate listing or one that has sold in near mint condition. See how close to original issue price other similar examples have brought and adjust accordingly. Sometimes anniversary models don't catch on.....and other times they do.
If a large percentage of the original issue ended up being "saved" in the wrappers, that excess supply keeps the price down. If the original issue price was extremely high, it may not even get bring 75-100% of that price.

I would imagine most buyers would want to inspect such a drum very closely for "flaws" whether factory or post-factory. So the original bags might have to opened. If the drum came in a special "anniversary" box then it would be important to have that
packaging be mint. If it just got delivered in a plain old "Ludwig" box....not so critical.
 
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LRod1707

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For those who got one cheap, you're lucky! The LB553B is rare! So I think currently it would command a high pricei since it's NOS whether the box is sealed or not. Right now on Reverb they've got two and they are both used. One is over $1200 and the other is almost $1K. It's just a matter of finding the right buyer. I don't think because its a 3" it would matter, some people really like piccolo's!
 
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dtk

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Unlike say a Matchbox or Hotwheels or even a Barbie...in a sealed box...you can't see the drum in its cardboard box...I'm not sure you can sell it well 'unseen'...so I'm not sure the sealed box is an asset...I'm thinking liability.
 

el_37

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I would leave it alone- some collectors really go nuts over NOS stuff and the instant that plastic bag is opened- they lose all interest.

Or you will satisfy that one person who missed out buying a new one in 1994, and wants the satisfaction of cracking that bag open.

In my experience (across all of my various hobbies) NOS almost always has a premium over regular used- even if the packaging is a little rough or has been partially opened.
 

Tama CW

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The one problem with "NOS" is that people have varying definitions of that term. For vintage drums it would include "shelf" wear or handling as it was moved from place to place.
"New" and "New Old Stock" are not the same thing. I've had "NOS" items sent to me that had enough wear and tear from "sitting around" that I wouldn't have even called them "Mint" or "Excellent."
 

el_37

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The one problem with "NOS" is that people have varying definitions of that term. For vintage drums it would include "shelf" wear or handling as it was moved from place to place.
"New" and "New Old Stock" are not the same thing. I've had "NOS" items sent to me that had enough wear and tear from "sitting around" that I wouldn't have even called them "Mint" or "Excellent."
A few of us had an argument on here a while back about that- I think the 2 of us were in agreement. NOS just meant it never sold beyond the wholesale level- it is not a condition or a cosmetic grade.

But there is a real following among collectors of almost anything that was originally offered for sale at the retail level for NOS items. Original packaging is so rare for many items (only maniacs saved packaging in the pre collectible era- now it seems like quite a few people preserve packaging), that NOS items still in their box/packaging are prized regardless of the condition of the packing material.
 

rsq911

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Thank you for the replies!
I believe the term "NOS" does get throw around a lot, and with "technically" different vantage points. As some of you pointed out, if something was never sold, "technically" it is nos, even if it was sitting in Guitar Center's drum room being tested.

This drum is brand new in the box, but, I have opened the box and photographed the drum in the bag. I do not plan on selling it because it was something I purchased while recovering from a car accident. I wanted a "unique" black beauty and felt the numbered engraved piccolo would fit the bill. Plus, I did not have a metal one to go with my classic maple one.

As el_37 pointed out, the "new in the packaging" of today has reached "cult" status. Look at the Star Wars "anything."

I have one of Bun E.'s 100th Anniversary snares, and I saved the box, but I have played it. And I will say that I have saved a couple of other boxes for my Ludwig snares that are unique and rare, because all the info is on the box labels, and maybe that will make a difference to whomever gets it next. But for me, it seems like the "current collectible" thing to do lol!
 

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davezedlee

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i imagine if you tried to sell it later, you'd have an easier time moving it as a drum in "immaculate condition" versus all the crap from people trying to degrade what it means to be "new"

if you work in retail... you know
 


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