Vintage Drum Hardware or Modern Drum Hardware

Vintage Drum Hardware or Modern Drum Hardware

  • Modern Drum Hardware 1985 through present

    Votes: 37 86.0%
  • Vintage Drum Hardware 1915 though 1985

    Votes: 6 14.0%

  • Total voters
    43

Deafmoon

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I use all Ludwig 1400 vintage flat base cymbal stands & 'spur-lock' hi-hat stands because they are light & last forever if you treat them right. I don't even own any modern double-braced stuff any more. It's all too heavy. I do use a modern snare stand and bass pedals these days though.
Yep the flat base cymbal stands Ludwig made were very sturdy. I never had the HiHat though, I played the Rogers HiHat Supreme stand with a Ludwig Speed King and later a Rogers Swivomatic after that. When I went to Tama in the early 80’s, I remember that every thing was just getting more and more massive. And the quality was hit or miss. The only pedal that ever gave me a serious problem was the Tama King Beat. Cracked in half!
 

The Top Hat

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I think if you’re not going to play it, leave it original if it’s all there. My feelings are that the really early, pre-1950’s hardware is not reliable, it’s often squeaky and flimsy. If the hardware isn’t all there, do what your heart desires. You build your drum(s) for yourself to enjoy and admire. If other people like it, it’s a bonus. I don’t build them to impress anyone else. Be yourself, everyone else is taken.
 

hsosdrum

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I do have and like a Rogers 1st gen bass drum pedal. Has anyone ever made a better one?
I once had a pair of Swiv-o-Matic pedals and they're better than anything else I've ever tried except for the DW9000s I'm currently using.

The only pieces of vintage (pre-1980s) hardware that I would even remotely consider using today would be:

1) The W&A Buck Rogers snare drum stand

Buck Rogers Stand.jpg


2) The W&A hi-hat, known as the "Perfection" (Rogers), "Miracle" (Ludwig), "Artist" (Slingerland), etc.

W_A HiHat.jpg


3) The W&A rail consolette tom holder

RailConsolette2.jpg


IMHO the rest is all junk: poorly designed, flimsy, prone to breakage (even when brand-new) and just plain didn't do the jobs they were supposed to do. ESPECIALLY the bass drum spurs.
 
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Deafmoon

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I think if you’re not going to play it, leave it original if it’s all there. My feelings are that the really early, pre-1950’s hardware is not reliable, it’s often squeaky and flimsy. If the hardware isn’t all there, do what your heart desires. You build your drum(s) for yourself to enjoy and admire. If other people like it, it’s a bonus. I don’t build them to impress anyone else. Be yourself, everyone else is taken.
Well said!
 

The Top Hat

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Here is an example of my saved 1930-32 Ludwig Peacock Pearl. It will be completely finished tomorrow. Now a Frankenset with some DW hardware and chrome lugs. The wrap is all original, most of the original hardware was missing, so now it’s back and fully functional. More pics later.
 

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cinemadrummer2001

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I definitely agree that most modern hardware has no personality. I use 1970’s Pearl cymbal stands and I love them. They are lightweight AND sturdy, and they have their own identity and look as well.
If it had to be one or the other, I'd play all vintage hardware with no hesitation. I'm almost doing that now anyway, other than 4 x DW Ultralight cymbal stands. And I'm thinking I'll go back to my vintage flat base cymbal stands - a mixture of Ludwig and Walberg & Auge.

I've said this before in these threads; modern hardware for the most part might be a little more functional or offer extra features, but in most cases is over engineered. Not to mention way too heavy. I've seen hi hat clutches that should come with an instructional manual.

And since 99% of today's hardware comes out of the same factory in China, there is zero personality or individuality between brands. How many drum companies use the same bass drum spurs? How many companies have almost identical looking cymbal stands? Vintage hardware looks so much better and has way more personality, in my opinion. And for the most part, each brand was unique. Even though W&A was making hardware for many companies back in the day, they were able to differentiate themselves.

Nothing kills the "vibe" of a vintage kit more than a bunch of modern double braced cymbal and hi hat stands.
F0864273-9686-4D58-BCA3-337888C83A21.jpeg
 
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A.TomicMorganic

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I use all Ludwig 1400 vintage flat base cymbal stands & 'spur-lock' hi-hat stands because they are light & last forever if you treat them right. I don't even own any modern double-braced stuff any more. It's all too heavy. I do use a modern snare stand and bass pedals these days though.
Me too. Along with a flat based snare stand. Durable, functional and lightweight. Took them out on thousands of gigs. Very few problems. Modern pedal.
 

BennyK

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Rogers Swivo and Premier Lokfast are the best examples of vintage hardware for me . I still use 60's Ludwig snare stands and I have a couple of their flat based cymbal stands too .

Sonor teardrop era " Made in West Germany " is on par with Rogers, but with European sizing .
 

Iristone

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I like modern lightweight designs. The few premodern hardwares I've owned all suffered from wear and tear, if not downright under-engineering.
 

Ludwigboy

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I
Rogers Swivo and Premier Lokfast are the best examples of vintage hardware for me . I still use 60's Ludwig snare stands and I have a couple of their flat based cymbal stands too .

Sonor teardrop era " Made in West Germany " is on par with Rogers, but with European sizing .
For my gigging kit, I also use the Rogers Swivo hardware on my vintage 60's Ludwig and use vintage Ludwig swivel foot cymbal stands and hi hat stand plus Speed King but use modern Gilbraltar 1 post accessory mount for my modern LP cowbell and Rhythm Tech tambourine.

I have found those Ludwig swivel foot models durable for gigging maybe once a week and the Rogers hardware is durable and dependable. Also hi hats are 70's Zildjian New Beats and crash is a modern 19" Zildjian thin crash and a modern 18" Zildjian Avedis .

On my other 60's Ludwig kits, it is all vintage stuff: Ludwig flat based cymbal stands, flat base hi hat stand, cowbell/woodblock mount, Speed King, W&A bass drum anchor and vintage late 50's-60's Zildjian crash/ride and hi hats
 

multijd

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I use a lot of vintage hardware (and drums, and marimba, and timpani, and vibes, and percussion Lol) but have supplemented with some of the modern build lightweight stuff from dw and tama (Ive always liked their stands). A lot of modern hardware is too heavy for me. I don’t need that weight and if the older stuff is still functional (including my super setomatic, calato pedals, floating action, rogers and ludwig hihats) then I’m still using it.
 

drummer64

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If it had to be one or the other, I'd play all vintage hardware with no hesitation. I'm almost doing that now anyway, other than 4 x DW Ultralight cymbal stands. And I'm thinking I'll go back to my vintage flat base cymbal stands - a mixture of Ludwig and Walberg & Auge.

I've said this before in these threads; modern hardware for the most part might be a little more functional or offer extra features, but in most cases is over engineered. Not to mention way too heavy. I've seen hi hat clutches that should come with an instructional manual.

And since 99% of today's hardware comes out of the same factory in China, there is zero personality or individuality between brands. How many drum companies use the same bass drum spurs? How many companies have almost identical looking cymbal stands? Vintage hardware looks so much better and has way more personality, in my opinion. And for the most part, each brand was unique. Even though W&A was making hardware for many companies back in the day, they were able to differentiate themselves.

Nothing kills the "vibe" of a vintage kit more than a bunch of modern double braced cymbal and hi hat stands.
I couldn't agree with you more!!! I've owned about 15 vintage sets - ages from 1948 through 1974 (Rogers, Ludwig, Premier, Gretsch, Slingerland) and I currently own 7 vintage sets. I have been playing since 1965 - I have NEVER had any problem with cymbal stands, hi-hats, tom mounts, BD spurs, etc etc. I think the newer tom holders and too massive and ugly (not to mention the black and ugly lug gaskets....what's the purpose?)......and my BIGGEST PET-PEEVE is a ride tom not mounted on the bass drum, but instead, mounted on a snare drum stand - especially if it's on a vintage set - with the original tom mounting system either removed (Ahhhhh!!!) or just not used. I can't believe the new Rogers drums ($$$$) - don't even come with a Swiv-O-Matic tom holder on the bass drum.
 

BlueFlame

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Johnny D perfectly describes the romance (and functionality) of vintage hardware. I don’t own a set of drums newer than 1985, and most are much older that that, so I dig vintage. That said? If I could marry my Yamaha Crosstown hardware I would. If it could eat human food I’d feed it ravioli and cake every day. I’m working on adapting Shakespeare’s sonnets to mention it. “So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, Crosstown alone shall my hardware be”. So, yeah.
 

Algis Jaras

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I know it seems like a no-brainer, but there are still lots of folks who relish the lugs, stands and pedals pre 1985 and may be able to give some insight as to their virtues. I personally, am glad to leave behind some of the stuff I used in the 60's and 70's, but there's something for everyone. What are your thoughts? And if this isn't for you...please just move on to another thread, thanks!
 

Algis Jaras

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In the end... it's kind of like cars. if you need a fresh new no problems kit, get yourself a new or slightly used kit. Which I have and love. However... I recently ran into an old 1980's Slingerland kit in someone's basement. I have never refurbished drums before. But I could not resist. I have gotten a lot of great tips and help on how to do it. Drum Forum people are the best! Now I have been obsessed. Just seeing this old chrome transform to gorgeous shiny pieces of art by simply soaking in dawn dishwashing liquid and a toothbrush. So satisfying! It's kind of like restoring a 57 Chevy you found in someone's yard and you restored it back to its glory years. Once in a lifetime of kind stuff. Has no effect on your drumming... I don't think. By knowing this kit inside and out may help me find some new sounds. Inspire me to develop a more personal sound. Have not gone that far yet. I like to think it may happen. Regardless, I find this very satisfying. But you need to be in the mood and have the time. Here are a few snaps of the 1980's stick saver rims drying in the sun... hold one up and hit them w a stick and they ring like a bell. Hey, maybe that's a drumming idea?
 

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FitDrummer

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I kept my 80’s Pearl kick pedal, same model when I played in 8th grade jazz band! I just recently upgraded cymbal and hh stands, so everything is much easier/lighter.

Cymbal stands: DW UL
Hi Hat stand: Yamaha Crosstown
Snare stand: Tama Stagestar
Kick pedal: 80’s Pearl
 

kdgrissom

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What still works like new after 50-60 years? The functional stands that were wholly made with steel (if properly cared for). Once plastic and rubber and pot-metal entered the mix, breakage occurred.
I will say however that the drum thrones of today are far better than the picket-fences that were offered by drum companies of the past.
 

karlcrafton

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I've been using the DW 6000 flat base boom & straight stands for almost 15 years now, and I really have no reason to go any heavier. Even with the medium weight stands DW and other brands have.
Even though I use cymbals that are larger (20-24) I haven't had any stability issues at all either.

Also, Tama's Classic flat base stands are FANTASTIC, every single stand is brilliant.
Super sturdy, and light.
 

Corbin L Douthitt

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I know it seems like a no-brainer, but there are still lots of folks who relish the lugs, stands and pedals pre 1985 and may be able to give some insight as to their virtues. I personally, am glad to leave behind some of the stuff I used in the 60's and 70's, but there's something for everyone. What are your thoughts? And if this isn't for you...please just move on to another thread, thanks!
in the beginning was expensive lightweight stuff-(early 1900's) that all there was. When that was not sufficient, drummers made their own stuff to meet their needs. Then about 1950- Rock N Roll happened.. drum kits flew out the doors- CHEAP kits, CHEAP hardware, CHEAP cymbals- "budget stuff". When that failed on the gig, drummers demanded better stuff. Then came concerts- HUGE venues- set up- break down--set up break down- poor designs appeared quickly and the heavy duty stuff was made- TAMA, DW- etc.. Then came old age-- light weight is easier to haul when you don't have a roadie..If your hardware bag needs wheels or two people- it weighs too much or you carry too much!!
 


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