Vintage Drum Hardware or Modern Drum Hardware

Vintage Drum Hardware or Modern Drum Hardware

  • Modern Drum Hardware 1985 through present

    Votes: 37 86.0%
  • Vintage Drum Hardware 1915 though 1985

    Votes: 6 14.0%

  • Total voters
    43

kzac

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Owned all types of hardware over my 5 decades of playing drums.
I must admit that the one thing that kept improving over the years is drum hardware.

So what was 1960s hardware really like?

1- The cymbal stands were all straight stands, all with direct contact wing nuts and most with cymbal tilters. The threads would strip out (often) That said, most of the stands had very thin cymbal rods and a three flat fingers at the base, it was not uncommon to knock these cymbal stands over, especially for those who had large cymbals. Worse was when you had two mounted (rack) toms, it was near impossible to find a good cymbal position, with straight stands. Cymbal stands on the bass drum... These stands made a lot of harmonic vibration noise when you played your bass or mounted toms.

2- Snare stands had the same base as cymbal stands. They posseted a flat plate with a triangle folding set of arms (some hooked some L shaped) to hold the snare. Two of the arms swung into position at 5 and 7 O'clock while the remaining arm remained at 12 O'Clock and slid into position to grasp the drum. Usually the 12 O'clock arm would slide out of place providing a wobbly snare drum while you were playing. We solved this problem by taping the 12 O'clock arm into place....

3- High hat stands were cheaply made employing a single spring unusually held onto a rod with a single metal plate that was threaded the pedal pulled down on the metal plate which had no bearing surface to ride against usually only a felt washer. The continual pulling at the plate would cause the threads to strip and the stand to fail.... High hat stands were prone to walking away as well. So basically you spent a lot of time chasing your drums.

4- Bass drum spurs... None of them worked ... non of them ... they all allowed the bass drum to creep away from the drum kit, Most of us would tie a string to two of the bass drum lugs and thread it behind our drum throne, in order to keep the bass drum from creeping....

5- Tom mounts... Some were decent and worked for the most part. If you had the old single mount which adapted to a slide on the bass drum, then it often came loose and the metal would spring, then you would be adding cardboard or tape or other stuff in between the metal parts to take up the clearance so the tom arm would tighten up again... The dual tom mounts (especially Ludwig) worked fairly well but they were very limited to drum position and there was that Dang tom wrench you had to keep up with, I must have had 4 or 5 of those things floating around in my stuff.

6- Drum thrones. The majority had a thin oval seat with a spine support that bent toward the rear and two smaller legs which flipped outward from the spine to form a triangle. Height was adjusted using a bold and wing nut to fit into the holes on the spine shaft.. Uncomfortable? You bet. Worse if you had a tendency like me to lean back on the stool, the front feet would unlock and the stool would become unstable...

7- Bass drum pedals, There were not as robust as today, but my speed king pedal was my best piece of hardware until I got my atlas stands, which made a world of difference hardware wise...

Compare that era to what we use today.. Its a world of difference.
 
Last edited:

sternerp

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I have a 1968 Ludwig Hollywood kit that came with all of the original hardware and throne. It looks really cool, but the stands are flimsy, and are more prone to damage than modern hardware. I tried retro-looking flat based stands on my Gretsch New Classic, but found that tripod stands are easier to position over the top of other stands. Many post-Covid gigs are held outdoors on a lawn or just dirt. On uneven surfaces, flat based stands wobble too much.
 

Drumbumcrumb

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I like the best of both worlds - modern stuff with a vintage vibe. All of the class and style with none of the rust and squeaks. I really like lightweight, modern flat base stands that are just like their vintage counterparts but have perfectly working wingnuts, memory locks, and tilters. I love vintage inspired center lugs and roundover edges a la Club Date, and the vintage style spurs and such. I dig the beertap strainer and vintage build of Way drums, the thin shells with rerings, and I love that the edges are cut to precise modern specs and heads fit beautifully! So, I love the vintage sound and look and elegant simplicity - but I don’t want to deal with out-of-round drums and peeling wraps and pitted hoops. I want my cake AND eat it too!
 

FitDrummer

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Owned all types of hardware over my 5 decades of playing drums.
I must admit that the one thing that kept improving over the years is drum hardware.

So what was 1960s hardware really like?

1- The cymbal stands were all straight stands, all with direct contact wing nuts and most with cymbal tilters. The threads would strip out (often) That said, most of the stands had very thin cymbal rods and a three flat fingers at the base, it was not uncommon to knock these cymbal stands over, especially for those who had large cymbals. Worse was when you had two mounted (rack) toms, it was near impossible to find a good cymbal position, with straight stands. Cymbal stands on the bass drum... These stands made a lot of harmonic vibration noise when you played your bass or mounted toms.

2- Snare stands had the same base as cymbal stands. They posseted a flat plate with a triangle folding set of arms (some hooked some L shaped) to hold the snare. Two of the arms swung into position at 5 and 7 O'clock while the remaining arm remained at 12 O'Clock and slid into position to grasp the drum. Usually the 12 O'clock arm would slide out of place providing a wobbly snare drum while you were playing. We solved this problem by taping the 12 O'clock arm into place....

3- High hat stands were cheaply made employing a single spring unusually held onto a rod with a single metal plate that was threaded the pedal pulled down on the metal plate which had no bearing surface to ride against usually only a felt washer. The continual pulling at the plate would cause the threads to strip and the stand to fail.... High hat stands were prone to walking away as well. So basically you spent a lot of time chasing your drums.

4- Bass drum spurs... None of them worked ... non of them ... they all allowed the bass drum to creep away from the drum kit, Most of us would tie a string to two of the bass drum lugs and thread it behind our drum throne, in order to keep the bass drum from creeping....

5- Tom mounts... Some were decent and worked for the most part. If you had the old single mount which adapted to a slide on the bass drum, then it often came loose and the metal would spring, then you would be adding cardboard or tape or other stuff in between the metal parts to take up the clearance so the tom arm would tighten up again... The dual tom mounts (especially Ludwig) worked fairly well but they were very limited to drum position and there was that Dang tom wrench you had to keep up with, I must have had 4 or 5 of those things floating around in my stuff.

6- Drum thrones. The majority had a thin oval seat with a spine support that bent toward the rear and two smaller legs which flipped outward from the spine to form a triangle. Height was adjusted using a bold and wing nut to fit into the holes on the spine shaft.. Uncomfortable? You bet. Worse if you had a tendency like me to lean back on the stool, the front feet would unlock and the stool would become unstable...

7- Bass drum pedals, There were not as robust as today, but my speed king pedal was my best piece of hardware until I got my atlas stands, which made a world of difference hardware wise...

Compare that era to what we use today.. Its a world of difference.
I do wish though, manufactures would make a light weight base (legs) for thrones. Maybe something like the Yamaha crosstown feel, but of course extra sturdy. I love my Roc N Soc, but it’s heavy.
 

Iristone

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7- Bass drum pedals, There were not as robust as today, but my speed king pedal was my best piece of hardware until I got my atlas stands, which made a world of difference hardware wise...
Totally agree, the Speed King is the only piece of old hardware I'd regularly use. I've bought a reissue just in case, though.
 

Slingwig26

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Modern takes on vintage. I really like the Yamaha crosstown hardware. I also like the Ludwig Atlas mount or the newer Inde mounts. Also, the heavy metal crowd with the monster cage rack systems. They didn’t have that back when, or did they?
Oh ya know what would be neat, bring back a lightweight modern version of the old tyme floor tom stand. The one the drum sits on that looks collapsible. It would be light, easy to set up and pack.
 

Slingwig26

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I do wish though, manufactures would make a light weight base (legs) for thrones. Maybe something like the Yamaha crosstown feel, but of course extra sturdy. I love my Roc N Soc, but it’s heavy.
Try a On Stage small keyboard bench. I’ve been using those for over 12 years. They fold up and strap to the top of my rolling nylon hardware bag with my 3x5 gig rug folded under it. (If you don’t mind sitting low)
 

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FitDrummer

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Try a On Stage small keyboard bench. I’ve been using those for over 12 years. They fold up and strap to the top of my rolling nylon hardware bag with my 3x5 gig rug folded under it. (If you don’t mind sitting low)
Thanks! I'll check that out.
 


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