Vintage Slingerland Restoration? Or Fuggetaboutit?

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The cleaning with Dawn and paint stripping with care is first. Pealing lamination of shells can be handled with the correct glue. If the shells have good integrity, light play with the right heads would certainly perk dad up. Cymbal patina yes, dirt and stains no. (I used 1/2 lemon followed by a 50% vinegar solution wash on mine and then let a true patina return with good effect.) I also endorse oiling those thirsty shells when the heads are off...I've used both Pledge Lemon Oil and a high grade beeswax furniture treatment later. Those shells would be mahogany. I spent time and a little money on restoring my '63 Slingerland Modern Jazz kit and play the daylights out of it. My professional friends love that vintage sound. It's a labor of love and you will get there once you begin the journey.
 

emada

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Backstory: This drum kit has a special meaning to me. They were Dad’s drums, and he stopped playing them before he went in the Navy. They were in Grandma’s attic for a long time. We would visit her, or else I’d get dropped off there, and one day I wandered up to the attic and found these drums. I got permission to play them, so that’s what I did every time we visited her.
I was about 7 years old, and this was my first experience with a
musical instrument. I have great memories of going up there and pounding away on those drums.

When my Grandma moved to an apartment in the early 1980s, Dad asked me if I wanted the drums. I didn’t even hesitate. They have stayed with me somehow, through all of the attics or closets of places I have lived.
View attachment 405990

Why did I wait this long? I don’t know if I have an answer for that. I had good intentions about ten years ago, and I made some inquiries, but that kind of faded out.
I had a nostalgic Kent kit...nothing fancy, but the first kit my parents could afford and bought for me. I kept the snare, cleaned it up, and have it hanging on the wall in my drum space. You could pick a piece that represents what you like about the kit, and keep that in a place of honor. That bass head is amazeballs...
 

way to old

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Backstory: This drum kit has a special meaning to me. They were Dad’s drums, and he stopped playing them before he went in the Navy. They were in Grandma’s attic for a long time. We would visit her, or else I’d get dropped off there, and one day I wandered up to the attic and found these drums. I got permission to play them, so that’s what I did every time we visited her.
I was about 7 years old, and this was my first experience with a
musical instrument. I have great memories of going up there and pounding away on those drums.

When my Grandma moved to an apartment in the early 1980s, Dad asked me if I wanted the drums. I didn’t even hesitate. They have stayed with me somehow, through all of the attics or closets of places I have lived.
View attachment 405990

Why did I wait this long? I don’t know if I have an answer for that. I had good intentions about ten years ago, and I made some inquiries, but that kind of faded out.
Cool drums. Take the GOOD advice that some members have given and just do a good clean up - no harsh cleaner, sandpaper, steel wool, etc. that would damage what appears to be nickle plated hardware. Patina costs you nothing and IF you decide to sell them at some point, that is what a lot of collectors are looking for and could add to their value. As long as the shells are true and the bearing edges are in good shape, there's no reason that these drums could not be brought back to life. If you have to replace anything, keep the original parts. They don't make these anymore and some collectors are always looking for original pieces.
 

Philly James

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Update:

I soaked the tom hardware in Dawn for 24 hours. I didn’t see much progress, so I soaked them again for 4 days.

This is how they look:

FB19CDC5-A5BD-43A6-B088-2DA67634B0D6.jpeg




Do they need more soaking? The lugs almost seem to be more tarnished, or am I not being patient?

Here’s the before soaking pic:

C2C7E2A4-9F67-4097-AC41-61D79E30E4D7.jpeg
 
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JDZ

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I'm afraid you are at the "elbow grease" stage for the lugs and rods. Dawn works much better on Chrome than Nickel. Cape Cod polishing cloths will finish them up.

Dave
 

Philly James

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I'm afraid you are at the "elbow grease" stage for the lugs and rods. Dawn works much better on Chrome than Nickel. Cape Cod polishing cloths will finish them up.

Dave
Cape Cod cloths? Available at hardware store?
 

K.O.

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Any of those will do the trick. Whichever you can find easiest should work fine. I use 100% white cotton flannel to polish drum stuff with. Cloth with polyester content has harder fibers that can produce microscopic scratches in drum wrap or paint. Polyester is probably okay for polishing hardware but why risk it (and never ever use any grade of steel wool). I usually just buy a half yard or so of white flannel at Walmart and tear off small pieces as I need them. My local hardware store carries Simichrome, which is a German made metal polish.
 
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Tama CW

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Dawn is good on rust and grunge, especially on chrome and bare steel. Nickel is tougher to clean. I have found that soaking nickel for days can tend to make it look worse as some of the old rust and dirt in the "brown" water tries to go back on the parts. In many cases I just leave the nickel lugs as they are....polishing to the cows come home might be good for a top notch restoration....but for a player's presentable kit, I like to leave them natural and aged. For bare steel like your clamps and bass drum legs, I use a muriatic acid soak (5-60 minutes). And then lightly brush with a Dawn soaked brillo pad to give a more uniform, steel gray appearance. If it leaves some faint lines, so be it. I don't see them though. Dirty, blotchy, or rusty steel parts aren't pretty to look at. Muriatic is tough on nickel.....will turn it black. Don't do that.
 
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Philly James

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The rookie restorationist is waiting for products to arrive.:icon_e_biggrin:
 

Philly James

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Important question: Should I start a part two thread, since this one has reached almost 100 posts, or should I maintain the continuity, and stick with the long thread?
 

Philly James

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Update:

Sorry about the delay, but my workload increased at my job.

I bought the Cape Cod Cloths, Mother’s Mag, and Simichrome as suggested.

They all seem to work pretty well.

90693579-17F0-42B6-862A-EDB042FE4C4C.jpeg


I don’t even have to say which is before and which is after.

I think I might try a soft toothbrush and one of the pastes, to clean the hard-to-get-to spots. Any thoughts?
 


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