Vintage Vibraphone motors

Brydone

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Hi, I've recently purchased a Premier 700 Vibraphone and I'm not sure if the motor works or not because there is no power cable. The motor its self if a Gerrard D15 Induction Motor and as far as I know its in good condition. I would like to know if anyone has any experience with old vibraphone motors. I'll post some photos to get a better idea. The Yellow arrow is pointing to where I think the power cable is supposed to connect. I opened it up and there was a little + sign and no wire connected.
 

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Speedy Keen

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Depending on the size of town you live in , there may be a shop that services electric motors. Where I live
there is one and my employer sends things there for service from time to time. Just an idea.
 

thin shell

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If you loosen that screw and take off that cover and post some pictures of whats inside to confirm the following.

There are two ways to wire it depending on what voltage you have.

Depending on how it is configured you may have to change the two bridging bars. They should be held in place by nuts on each terminal.

120 volts you should have two brass bars as shown in the diagram on the cover. You connect the wires where I have shown.

vibraphone wiring 120v.png


If it is wired for 220v then both bars should be stacked as shown below. The wires connect to the same spot as shown.

vibraphone wiring 220v.png


If it configured for one but need the other then you will need to move the bridging bars for the proper voltage.

It would be best to have ring terminals to attach your power cord. A grounded three prong plug would be a good idea although it probably originally only had a two prong plug. The ground wire would get connected to the metal frame of the vibraphone
 
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Brydone

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If you loosen that screw and take off that cover and post some pictures of whats inside to confirm the following.

There are two ways to wire it depending on what voltage you have.

Depending on how it is configured you may have to change the two bridging bars. They should be held in place by nuts on each terminal.

120 volts you should have two brass bars as shown in the diagram on the cover. You connect the wires where I have shown.

View attachment 452678

If it is wired for 220v then both bars should be stacked as shown below. The wires connect to the same spot as shown.

View attachment 452679

If it configured for one but need the other then you will need to move the bridging bars for the proper voltage.

It would be best to have ring terminals to attach your power cord. A grounded three prong plug would be a good idea although it probably originally only had a two prong plug. The ground wire would get connected to the metal frame of the vibraphone


Thanks for the help. Here are some new photos of the inside.
 

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thin shell

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Thanks for posting those. The diagram on the cover was a little misleading so this is how it should be wired. I have updated my earlier pictures.

vibraphone wiring 120v updated.png


vibraphone wiring 220v updated.png


It looks like there are two bridging bars stacked on the top two studs. If you need 220 leave that as is. If you need 120 remove them and place them as I have shown in the first picture.

The power connects to the two studs on the bottom. Connect your power cord here. There is not switch wired in at this point so the motor should turn on when you plug it in.

What is the story on the clear insulated wire coming from the bottom stud and going into the hole? Does it go to a switch or something else? It looks like it is two conductor lamp cord. I would remove it before connecting the power cord for now.
 

Brydone

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Thanks again. I'm not sure whether it needs to be 120v or 220v. Is there a way I could figure that out, or is it even important?

The insulated wire coming connecting to the bottom stud connects to the on/off switch.

For a power cord should I be looking at something like this?
 

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thin shell

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What country do you live in? That will tell us what the voltage is where you live?
 
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tillerva

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I have a vibraphone that had a very old motor but was noisy. Took it to a motor repair place and that didn’t work out.i ended up buying a new motor that is variable speed which is a lot of fun.
 

thin shell

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You can also show me a picture of a power outlet on your wall to determine the voltage. And it definitely does matter.
 

Brydone

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I have a vibraphone that had a very old motor but was noisy. Took it to a motor repair place and that didn’t work out.i ended up buying a new motor that is variable speed which is a lot of fun.

Yeah, I may have to do this, but I'd like to give the repair a try. I think the motor is ok.
 

thin shell

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OK thanks. That's the same outlet we use in the states so it is 120v. Your motor is currently wired for 220v so you will need to change the brass bars to match this picture. Don't worry about trying to hook the switch in at this time. You just want to see if the motor works.

If you don't feel comfortable doing this then I would highly recommend getting someone who understands electricity to do this for you. What is your understanding on electricity? Have you ever replaced a power cord on an appliance or a lamp?

vibraphone wiring 120v updated.png
 

Brydone

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Yeah, I have virtually no experience. There is a place in town that does instrument repair. It might be worth calling in and seeing what they can do for me. I'm also happy to give the DIY method a shot. Unfortunately there isn't even a power cable connected to the motor so I'd have to invest in that first.
 

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