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Vintage Zildjian Cymbal Finishes

IJR

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Is anyone knowledgable about the history of zildjian finishes in the 50s and 60s?

I see some that look brilliant and some that are more dull.

I am curious of how they came from the factory during different time periods.

I think I see more small stamps be dull, but some have shine (due to buffing)?

Do people have preference of the brilliant vs dull?

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Ludwigboy

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Is anyone knowledgable about the history of zildjian finishes in the 50s and 60s?

I see some that look brilliant and some that are more dull.

I am curious of how they came from the factory during different time periods.

I think I see more small stamps be dull, but some have shine (due to buffing)?

Do people have preference of the brilliant vs dull?

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I wonder if DFO member Zenstat (Steve) can lend a hand here? He is very knowledgeable in many things Zildjian!
 

mattr

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It’s the same phenomena you have with Turkish K’s, the older ones have the shine where as the later ones were duller. The adoption of tungsten carbide cutting tools in the 60s leaves a duller finish. The tool steels and such that were used before were blunted very quickly, and created a burnishing effect. It’s not to say they might have not have used steel wool or such to brighten up the appearance, but they didn’t have the multi step buffing/polishing methods that are used today to get that coppery shine.
 

Tama CW

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The only thing I can add is that I've read that some of the trans stamp 50's cymbals were buffed.....only on top I believe. Could have read that in something Zenstat posted. Not sure.
You do find some trans stamps with that bright and "slippery" or "oily" looking top surface.....if that's what factory buffing did. In the 1970's Zildjian's Constantinople & Cie line was specifically made
brilliant and hammered differently from the A's of that same period. That's about all I can add about brilliant vintage Z's.

It's also possible a later owner could be good at polishing cymbals and did something similar. Don't know if there's factory Zildjian literature noting that you can request a buffed or reflective-like finish on a 50's or earlier cymbal.
I have a 21" trans stamp type from the original owner....and it has that buffed look on the top. Doesn't look polished to me. Over-polished cymbals have that certain "messed with" and "unnatural look" imo.

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zenstat

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Mentioned on my timeline.

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There is an overlooked footnote in Pinksterboer which says

Zildjian applied buffing before World War II. The old Chinese cymbals (bo), pictured in Chapter 1, were also buffed.

I've found the same range of variation as Tama CW mentions with some buffed just on the top. I've got one T4 like that. And yes this isn't the same as what came along in 1971.

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which was available on both the A Zildjian series and the A Zildjian & Cie Constantinople series.
 


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