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Was it Morello that said….

wflkurt

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I remember when I first started drum set lessons I played traditional grip at first because I thought my teacher would expect me to. He asked me why I was using traditional grip on the drum set when I wanted to primarily learn rock drums. I mentioned I feel more comfortable with matched grip. He encouraged me to play however is most comfortable. He was a big Frank Beard / ZZ Top fan which in hindsight made him the perfect teacher for me. Frank Beard has a great feeling groove with some solid technique and so did my instructor.

Traditional grip was necessary when the marching snare drums were tilted at a 45 degree angle. From my perspective it really doesn't make any logical sense to play traditional grip on a drum set. I love the playing of many drummers who do though. It makes no difference to me how a player gets his sound. I respect that we're all the same in our uniqueness.


I agree with this. I love the look of traditional grip and love the jazz history behind it but no matter how i try, my matched grip is SO much better. I have no problem whatsoever playing low volume rudiments or jazz comping on the the left hand using matched. I will say that swishing the brushes for jazz feels more comfortable using traditional but even at that, I can still play rudiments better with brushes using the matched grip. There really is no point to play traditional at this point but I do find myself doing it at gigs on occasion, especially if it is a song I have played a billion times.
 

10 Lug

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Traditional with sticks and brushes, matched with rods.
 

JohnnyVibesAZ

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There are a lot of 'switch-hitters' out there. Steve Smith is the first one, who comes to mind. I think most of them started out being taught the traditional grip (or military grip, as we used to call it). I mostly use the traditional, today, unless I have to slam through the amplifiers.
 

multijd

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Smith plays more than just two grips. Many do. The beginning of Clayton Cameron’s book illustrates a slew of them. Grip is not important except in the beginning. Once you learn the instrument you can strike it innumerable ways. It all depends on sound and fluidity. What are you trying to achieve?
 

Tornado

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I can't hear the difference. So I guess it doesn't matter much to me what anyone else can hear.
 


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