We've Never Tackled The Greatest Drumming Movies of All Time?

hsosdrum

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All Night Long. The main character is a Jazz drummer up to no good in an effort to start his own band.
I was going to mention this one. It's an update of Shakespeare's Othello, with Patrick McGoohan playing the Iago character. Lots of cameos by '50s jazz musicians (Mingus, Brubeck and others) and good music throughout. Definitely worth seeking out.
 

hsosdrum

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Barret Deems in High Society. He even gets name-checked by Der Bingle at 2:20

This song and the "What a Swell Party" duet between Bing and Frank are the only good things in this otherwise awful remake of the classic "The Philadelphia Story".
 

Tornado

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I like Whiplash too. As long as you realize that the band director character is way over the top. No director is that much of a jerk, but I guess it makes the movie more intense.
I always hated that criticism. Of course band directors aren't normally, or even rarely, like that. They don't make movies about mundane every day life, lol. But a sociopathic guy rises to the top of "x" organization and is the antagonist of the story? Well, that's the oldest story of them all!
 

mydadisjr

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I couldn't get thru WHIPLASH. The band director guy (J K Simmons) was totally unbelievable (IMHO). I kept seeing the guy as the ALLSTATE dude. He just never seemed like a real band director, more like just another actor playing at being an overly angry band director.

I have been in a few college jazz bands and none of it rang true.

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MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM was very cool tho... the great Shelley Manne is in that one and worked with Frank.

from Wikipedia:

As jazz quickly assumed a major role in the musical background of films, so did Manne assume a major role as a drummer and percussionist on those soundtracks. A notable early example was 1955's The Man with the Golden Arm; Manne not only played drums throughout but functioned as a personal assistant to director Otto Preminger and tutored star Frank Sinatra. The Decca soundtrack LP credits him prominently for the "Drumming Sequences".
 

Pat A Flafla

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As a concert guy, I loved Belushi as the pissed off timpanist in The Man With One Red Shoe.
 

dcrigger

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I like Whiplash too. As long as you realize that the band director character is way over the top. No director is that much of a jerk, but I guess it makes the movie more intense.
Of course, it's over the top. But really not as much as so folks suggest. I had a concert band director that was in that league - dictatorial, abusive, belittling, unreasonable... the man was hugely talented, but he a tyrannical A**. And my degree advisor as well.

So like all movies do - Fletcher was distilled down and presented in full - easy for any one recognize - nasty glory. The real versions exist - ruining lives, souring young people from continuing their pursuits.

And don't get me wrong - I can be a real fan of upper level educators raising the bar and being to some degree hard cases. As the real world of music can get far far more demanding and basically unfair than that.

Anyway in my experience Fletcher was just a caricature of what the real deal seem like to someone like Andrew - who himself was a caricature of how neurotic young players can be in their desire to succeed.

But IMO - it is the closest we have ever gotten in the way of a movie about the internal struggles of actually being a musician. Not about reconciling it with having a girl friend, not about struggling with drugs, or booze, or crime, or any of the other things most of the other movies on that list is about.... A musician struggling with those things, rather than a musician struggling with being a player.

Of course, it was inaccurate - but do we all think that being a detective is like CSI? Or being a lawyer is like Law and Order? I'm sure in both those case, it sort of is - but it also is incredible unrealistic.

We just all know being a player - so the inaccuracies just leap out. But compared to most everything else?? I think the film maker really tried.

Personally Whiplash is #1 in my book just for the big family dinner scene alone - how many players have sat at that table surrounded by people that love them and maybe even support them throughly and yet at the same time know that they don't understand what it's like, why we do it... they simply don't.... and never really will... get it.

Loved it.

And saw it with an audience of normal folks that clearly walked away with an insight into what it means to be a musician that they never had before (I over heard a couple of conversations and actually talked to a few people on the way out)

I was so disappointed by the music community at large that couldn't get past their pettiness and own self importance to see how valuable this film was for the public to see.

Oh well...
 

cruddola

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So glad to see that Drumline (2002) is not on the list. I'm sure the normies loved it, but to me it was hot garbage.

Ask an actual fighter pilot what they think of the movie Top Gun, and you'll get the same reaction. They'll laugh at you.

New fighter pilot recruits at the Top Gun school are told not to even mention the movie, ever...or they'll get hazed. That's how cringeworthy it is to them, lol.

As someone who was in drumline and follows DCI, this movie was embarrassing.

Ask a Navy/Marine Flight-deck ape and he'll give a better answer than any fighter pilot!
 

underratedcowbell

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And this topic just became 100000x better! Cooler than cool posters. I wish I could get my hands on a good quality pic of of some of that posters. I would go down to my local printing company and make some prints to hang on the walls!
 

Vistalite Black

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I used to be a lifeguard and Baywatch was cringe worthy.
Crystal clear water on the west coast combined with folks in shorts swimming in 55 degree water used to make be shake my head in disbelief.
A lack of realism isn't what made "Baywatch" bad.
I couldn't get thru WHIPLASH. The band director guy (J K Simmons) was totally unbelievable (IMHO). I kept seeing the guy as the ALLSTATE dude. He just never seemed like a real band director, more like just another actor playing at being an overly angry band director.

I have been in a few college jazz bands and none of it rang true.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM was very cool tho... the great Shelley Manne is in that one and worked with Frank.

from Wikipedia:

As jazz quickly assumed a major role in the musical background of films, so did Manne assume a major role as a drummer and percussionist on those soundtracks. A notable early example was 1955's The Man with the Golden Arm; Manne not only played drums throughout but functioned as a personal assistant to director Otto Preminger and tutored star Frank Sinatra. The Decca soundtrack LP credits him prominently for the "Drumming Sequences".
The “unbelievable” band guy won an Oscar for his performance.

To me, it rang true there would be a band director who combined the old school tactics of football coach Woody Hayes with the verbal cruelty of Buddy Rich.
 

wflkurt

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Of course, it's over the top. But really not as much as so folks suggest. I had a concert band director that was in that league - dictatorial, abusive, belittling, unreasonable... the man was hugely talented, but he a tyrannical A**. And my degree advisor as well.

So like all movies do - Fletcher was distilled down and presented in full - easy for any one recognize - nasty glory. The real versions exist - ruining lives, souring young people from continuing their pursuits.

And don't get me wrong - I can be a real fan of upper level educators raising the bar and being to some degree hard cases. As the real world of music can get far far more demanding and basically unfair than that.

Anyway in my experience Fletcher was just a caricature of what the real deal seem like to someone like Andrew - who himself was a caricature of how neurotic young players can be in their desire to succeed.

But IMO - it is the closest we have ever gotten in the way of a movie about the internal struggles of actually being a musician. Not about reconciling it with having a girl friend, not about struggling with drugs, or booze, or crime, or any of the other things most of the other movies on that list is about.... A musician struggling with those things, rather than a musician struggling with being a player.

Of course, it was inaccurate - but do we all think that being a detective is like CSI? Or being a lawyer is like Law and Order? I'm sure in both those case, it sort of is - but it also is incredible unrealistic.

We just all know being a player - so the inaccuracies just leap out. But compared to most everything else?? I think the film maker really tried.

Personally Whiplash is #1 in my book just for the big family dinner scene alone - how many players have sat at that table surrounded by people that love them and maybe even support them throughly and yet at the same time know that they don't understand what it's like, why we do it... they simply don't.... and never really will... get it.

Loved it.

And saw it with an audience of normal folks that clearly walked away with an insight into what it means to be a musician that they never had before (I over heard a couple of conversations and actually talked to a few people on the way out)

I was so disappointed by the music community at large that couldn't get past their pettiness and own self importance to see how valuable this film was for the public to see.

Oh well...

I loved it too. There are plenty of things wrong with the movie and I could go on and on bit I love it. From a film makers perspective, it was filmed a little like a horror movie and I think that added some depth. I think I am able to just enjoy it for what it is and I find it enjoyable to watch. I don't know too many current movies that reference Jo Jones and Buddy Rich.
 

Pat A Flafla

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Technically the Jimmy Stewart version of The Man Who Knew Too Much counts. The entire plot revolves around a cymbal crash.
 


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